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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view




whats new at ieet

Transhumanism Needs to Establish a Meaning to Life

The Lima Accord on Climate Change – A New Hope for Health?

Anti-Koch: The Fight For Green Energy is a Fight for the 99 Percent

Fairness on the Public Airwaves

10 Reasons Popular Versions of Christian Heaven Would be Hell

Time to Start Looking At ‘Cyborg’ As a Gender Identity


ieet books

How “God” Works: A Logical Inquiry on Faith
Author
Marshall Brain

Virtually Human: The Promise—-and the Peril—-of Digital Immortality
Martine Rothblatt

A Taxonomy and Metaphysics of Mind-Uploading
Keith Wiley

A History of Life-Extensionism in the Twentieth Century
Ilia Stambler


comments

CygnusX1 on 'Transhumanism Needs to Establish a Meaning to Life' (Jan 31, 2015)

CygnusX1 on 'Can We Avoid a Surveillance State Dystopia?' (Jan 30, 2015)

instamatic on 'If There Are Gods, They Are Evil' (Jan 29, 2015)

Lincoln Cannon on 'The End of Religion Misrecognized' (Jan 29, 2015)

Pastor_Alex on 'If There Are Gods, They Are Evil' (Jan 29, 2015)

kddubb on 'The End of Religion Misrecognized' (Jan 29, 2015)

CygnusX1 on 'Cosmic Evolution and the Meaning of Life' (Jan 29, 2015)







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JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life

Hottest Articles of the Last Month


Bad luck and cancer – did the media get it wrong?
Jan 3, 2015
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The End of Religion: Technology and the Future
Jan 24, 2015
(14921) Hits
(5) Comments

#2 Editor’s Choice Award: 2040’s America will be like 1840’s Britain, with robots?
Jan 9, 2015
(6477) Hits
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#3 Editor’s Choice Award: Why and How Should We Build a Basic Income for Every Citizen?
Jan 5, 2015
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RSS feedETHICAL TECHNOLOGY

Richard Eskow

Yes, Obama “Won Twice” – as a Progressive. Deal With It, Everybody.

by Richard Eskow

Today’s American right is burdened with a highly specialized and hyper-amplified sense of outrage. That outrage was triggered during this week’s State of the Union speech, especially by the president’s off-the-cuff response to a group of Republicans who sarcastically applauded the line, “I have no more campaigns to run.”

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Exploring the Learning Experience Through Cognitive Science

WISE Channel

Important developments in cognitive science are casting new light on the complexity of the human brain. Applied to education, they can bring valuable and sometimes unexpected insights into the learning process, helping us challenge the impact of current curricula and pedagogies. So what can cognitive science teach us about fostering creativity and critical thinking and improving the learning experience?

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Science, Politics & Climate Change

Adam Ford

Whatever you believe about climate change and global warming, you need to educate yourself on the science behind it. In the debate about climate change, science should be at the center.

Also see this open letter to Tony Abbot that Peter Doherty was a contributor to: https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2014/2…

ABC's Big Ideas with Peter Doherty on Climate Change and Science: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/sto…



Peter Charles Doherty AC (born 15 October 1940) is an Australian veterinary surgeon and researcher in the field of medicine. He received the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1995, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly with Rolf M. Zinkernagel in 1996 and was named Australian of the Year in 1997. In the Australia Day Honours of 1997, he was named a Companion of the Order of Australia for his work with Zinkernagel. Zinkernagel was named an honorary Companion. He is also a National Trust Australian Living Treasure. He had a younger brother named Ian and had two parents named Linda and Eric. He skipped a grade in school and entered the University of Queensland when he was 17.



Doherty's research focuses on the immune system and his Nobel work described how the body's immune cells protect against viruses. He and Rolf Zinkernagel, the co-recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, discovered how T cells recognise their target antigens in combination with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins.



Viruses infect host cells and reproduce inside them. Killer T-cells destroy those infected cells so that the viruses cannot reproduce. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that, in order for killer T cells to recognise infected cells, they had to recognise two molecules on the surface of the cell – not only the virus antigen, but also a molecule of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This recognition was done by a T-cell receptor on the surface of the T cell. The MHC was previously identified as being responsible for the rejection of incompatible tissues during transplantation. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that the MHC was responsible for the body fighting meningitis viruses too.





Subscribe to this Channel: http://youtube.com/subscription_cente…



Science, Technology & the Future: http://scifuture.org

 

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Valerie Tarico

Religion’s Dirty Dozen—12 Really Bad Religious Ideas That Have Made the World Worse

by Valerie Tarico

Some of humanity’s technological innovations are things we would have been better off without: the medieval rack, the atomic bomb and powdered lead potions come to mind. Religions tend to invent ideas or concepts rather than technologies, but like every other creative human enterprise, they produce some really bad ones along with the good.

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“Surviving the 21st Century” (1hr 30min)

The Chomsky Videos

Noam Chomsky was born on December 7, 1928 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His undergraduate and graduate years were spent at the University of Pennsylvania where he received his PhD in linguistics in 1955. During the years 1951 to 1955, Chomsky was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard University Society of Fellows. While a Junior Fellow he completed his doctoral dissertation entitled, “Transformational Analysis.” The major theoretical viewpoints of the dissertation appeared in the monograph Syntactic Structure, which was published in 1957. This formed part of a more extensive work, The Logical Structure of Linguistic Theory, circulated in mimeograph in 1955 and published in 1975.

Chomsky joined the staff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1955 and in 1961 was appointed full professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (now the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.) From 1966 to 1976 he held the Ferrari P. Ward Professorship of Modern Languages and Linguistics. In 1976 he was appointed Institute Professor.

During the years 1958 to 1959 Chomsky was in residence at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, NJ. In the spring of 1969 he delivered the John Locke Lectures at Oxford; in January 1970 he delivered the Bertrand Russell Memorial Lecture at Cambridge University; in 1972, the Nehru Memorial Lecture in New Delhi, and in 1977, the Huizinga Lecture in Leiden, among many others.

Professor Chomsky has received honorary degrees from University of London, University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, Swarthmore College, Delhi University, Bard College, University of Massachusetts, University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University, Amherst College, Cambridge University, University of Buenos Aires, McGill University, Universitat Rovira I Virgili, Tarragona, Columbia University, University of Connecticut, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, University of Western Ontario, University of Toronto, Harvard University, University of Calcutta, and Universidad Nacional De Colombia. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Science. In addition, he is a member of other professional and learned societies in the United States and abroad, and is a recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the Helmholtz Medal, the Dorothy Eldridge Peacemaker Award, the Ben Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science, and others.

Chomsky has written and lectured widely on linguistics, philosophy, intellectual history, contemporary issues, international affairs and U.S. foreign policy. His works include: Aspects of the Theory of Syntax; Cartesian Linguistics; Sound Pattern of English (with Morris Halle); Language and Mind; American Power and the New Mandarins; At War with Asia; For Reasons of State; Peace in the Middle East?; Reflections on Language; The Political Economy of Human Rights, Vol. I and II (with E.S. Herman); Rules and Representations; Lectures on Government and Binding; Towards a New Cold War; Radical Priorities; Fateful Triangle; Knowledge of Language; Turning the Tide; Pirates and Emperors; On Power and Ideology; Language and Problems of Knowledge; The Culture of Terrorism; Manufacturing Consent (with E.S. Herman); Necessary Illusions; Deterring Democracy; Year 501; Rethinking Camelot: JFK, the Vietnam War and US Political Culture; Letters from Lexington; World Orders, Old and New; The Minimalist Program; Powers and Prospects; The Common Good; Profit Over People; The New Military Humanism; New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind; Rogue States; A New Generation Draws the Line; 9-11; and Understanding Power. http://www.chomsky.info/bios/2002——.htm

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Phil Torres

Problems with Defining an Existential Risk

by Phil Torres

What is an existential risk? The general concept has been around for decades, but the term was coined by Nick Bostrom in his seminal 2002 paper, here. Like so many empirical concepts – from organism to gene to law of nature, all of which are still debated by philosophically-minded scientists and scientifically-minded philosophers – the notion of an existential risk turns out to be more difficult to define than one might at first think.

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Existential Risk: Future of Humanity Institute | University of Oxford

FHIOxford

Because of accelerating technological progress, humankind may be rapidly approaching a critical phase in its career. In addition to well-known threats such as nuclear holocaust, the prospects of radically transforming technologies like nanotech systems and machine intelligence present us with unprecedented opportunities and risks. Our future, and whether we will have a future at all, may well be determined by how we deal with these challenges. In the case of radically transforming technologies, a better understanding of the transition dynamics from a human to a “posthuman” society is needed.

Of particular importance is to know where the pitfalls are: the ways in which things could go terminally wrong. While we have had long exposure to various personal, local, and endurable global hazards, this paper analyzes a recently emerging category: that of existential risks. These are threats that could cause our extinction or destroy the potential of Earth-originating intelligent life. Some of these threats are relatively well known while others, including some of the gravest, have gone almost unrecognized. Existential risks have a cluster of features that make ordinary risk management ineffective. A final section of this paper discusses several ethical and policy implications. A clearer understanding of the threat picture will enable us to formulate better strategies. - http://www.nickbostrom.com/existential/risks.html

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The 19-Year-Old Luminary Building A Cheaper, Better Prosthetic Limb

uproxx.com

You probably haven’t heard much about 19-year-old Easton LaChappelle, though he’s already done enough to land a job at NASA. Simply put, LaChappelle is changing the world for the better.

There’s been a fundamental shift in how we see technology. Science and engineering are no longer just industries. Technology is something we’re passionate about, whether we’re arguing over the iPhone or eagerly anticipating the next technology that will change everything. Just like every song has a story, the technology we most care about has a deeply personal journey behind it, from Steve Jobs’ decades-long obsession with changing how we use computers to Sergey Brin and Larry Page turning a fascination with the mathematics that underlie how we use the Internet into Google. Just like we care as much about the singer as we do the song, we care about the engineer behind the world-changing idea.

 

In Luminaries, the first original series from Uproxx, we find some of the most fascinating people in science and technology, and tell you not just what they’re making and how it’s revolutionary, but the creative process and the inspiration behind it. For example, Easton’s prosthetic arm came about because he met a little girl using a limb that cost $80,000. That struck him as far too much… uproxx.com

3D Printing in Animatronics: Easton LaChappelle at TEDxMileHigh

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The Rise of the Cyber Athletes: The professional Players Electronics Gaming 2015 BBC Debate Gaming

youtube

OJ Borg explores the growth of electronic sports, the professional players who take part, and the debate on whether gaming could be considered as a true sport. The Rise of the Cyber Athletes The professional Players Electronics Gaming 2015 BBC Debate Gaming BBC Shows The Rise of the Cyber Athletes The professional Players Electronics Gaming 2015 BBC Documentary OJ Borg explores the growth of electronic sports, the professional players who take part, and the debate on whether gaming could be considered as a true sport. Featuring interviews with Michael O’Dell manager of Team Dignitas - one of the world’s largest pro gaming teams. And Jann Mardenborough, who’s gone from Playstation champion in his bedroom to Red Bull’s driver development programme on the track.

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John G. Messerly

Appleman’s: The Labyrinth: God, Darwin, and the Meaning of Life (Part 2)

by John G. Messerly

Cosmic evolution gave birth to our sun and planet; chemical evolution brought forth atoms, molecules and cells; biological evolution led to us.  The process ran itself, there was no intelligent designer. But consciousness emerged, we are here, and within limits we are free. And yet we will die.

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Norman Solomon

Why the CIA Is So Eager to Demolish Whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling

by Norman Solomon

Midway through the trial of former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling, one comment stands out. “A criminal case,” defense attorney Edward MacMahon told the jury at the outset, “is not a place where the CIA goes to get its reputation back.” But that’s where the CIA went with this trial in its first week — sending to the witness stand a procession of officials who attested to the agency’s virtues and fervently decried anyone who might provide a journalist with classified information.

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Rick Searle

There are two paths to superlongevity: only one of them is good

by Rick Searle

Looked at in the longer historical perspective we have already achieved something our ancestors would consider superlongevity. In the UK life expectancy at birth averaged around 37 in 1700. It is roughly 81 today. The extent to which this is a reflection of decreased child mortality versus an increase in the survival rate of the elderly I’ll get to a little later, but for now, just try to get your head around the fact that we have managed to nearly double the life expectancy of human beings in a little over two centuries.

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John G. Messerly

Review of Appleman’s: The Labyrinth: God, Darwin, and the Meaning of Life (Part 1)

by John G. Messerly

Philip D. Appleman (1926 –  ) is an American poet, a Darwin scholar, and Professor Emeritus of English at Indiana University. He has recently published a new book: The Labyrinth: God, Darwin, and the Meaning of Life. It is a short book, only about 60 pages, but it is carefully and conscientiously crafted, so I will quote extensively from its beautiful prose.

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Richard Eskow

Today’s Visionary: A Guide to MLK’s 21st Century Insights

by Richard Eskow

Here it was again. This holiday weekend we saw a lot of media coverage of Martin Luther King, Jr. But we heard very little about who he really was – a brave and visionary leader whose vision is as relevant today as ever. Dr. King’s life and legacy stand as a challenge to an entrenched society of privilege and injustice. Here are nine quotes that reflect that legacy.

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Melanie Swan

Blockchain Thinking: Transition to Digital Societies of Multispecies Intelligence

by Melanie Swan

The future world could be one of multi-species intelligence. The possibility space could include “classic” humans, enhanced humans, digital mindfile uploads, and many forms of artificial intelligence: deep learning neural nets, machine learning algorithms, blockchain-based DACs (distributed autonomous organizations), and whole-brain software emulations.

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Valerie Tarico

How Religion Can Let Loose Humanity’s Most Violent Impulses

by Valerie Tarico

Religion is just one part of the lethal cocktail, but it is a powerful intoxicant. The year 2015 has opened to slaughter in the name of gods.  In Paris, two Islamist brothers executed Charlie Hebdo cartoonists “in defense of the Prophet,” while an associate killed shoppers in a kosher grocery.  In Nigeria, Islamist members of Boko Haram massacred a town to cries of Allahu Akbar—Allah is the greatest!  Simultaneously, the United Nations released a report detailing the “ethnic cleansing” of Muslims in the Central African Republic by Christian militias, sometimes reciting Bible verses.

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What is Technoprogressivism? Part II (A follow up)

Adam Ford

This show is a follow up after the Techoprogressive Declaration was released and discussed at the Transvision conference in France.

Technoprogressive Declaration - Transvision 2014


Posted: Nov 22, 2014
 

Here at the Transvision 2014 in Paris we just concluded a meeting of the technoprogressive caucus to draft a statement of common principles. The meeting consisted of the members of Technoprog!: AFT, Amon Twyman representing Zero State/Institute for Social Futurism, David Wood from the London Futurists, and me (J. Hughes) from IEET. The result is below. We are inviting individual and organizational co-signators. Please let me know if you would like to add your or your organization’s name.  We would like to collect co-signators between now and the end of the year, so you don’t have to decide immediately.

Technoprogressive Declaration

The world is unacceptably unequal and dangerous. Emerging technologies could make things dramatically better or worse.  Unfortunately too few people yet understand the dimensions of both the threats and rewards that humanity faces. It is time for technoprogressives, transhumanists and futurists to step up our political engagement and attempt to influence the course of events.

Our core commitment is that both technological progress and democracy are required for the ongoing emancipation of humanity from its constraints. Partisans of the promises of the Enlightenment, we have many cousins in other movements for freedom and social justice.  We must build solidarity with these movements, even as we intervene to point to the radical possibilities of technologies that they often ignore. With our fellow futurists and transhumanists we must intervene to insist that technologies are well-regulated and made universally accessible in strong and just societies. Technology could exacerbate inequality and catastrophic risks in the coming decades, or especially if democratized and well-regulated, ensure longer, healthy and more enabled lives for growing numbers of people, and a stronger and more secure civilization.

Beginning with our shared commitment to individual self-determination we can build solidarity with

- Organizations defending workers and the unemployed, as technology transforms work and the economy
- The movement for reproductive rights, around access to contraception, abortion, assisted reproduction and genomic choice
- The movement for drug law reform around the defense of cognitive liberty
- The disability rights movement around access to assistive and curative technologies
- Sexual and gender minorities around the right to bodily self-determination
- Digital rights movements around new freedoms and means of expression and organization

We call for dramatically expanded governmental research into anti-aging therapies, and universal access to those therapies as they are developed in order to make much longer and healthier lives accessible to everybody.  We believe that there is no distinction between “therapies” and “enhancement.”  The regulation of drugs and devices needs reform to speed their approval.

As artificial intelligence, robotics and other technologies increasingly destroy more jobs than they create, and senior citizens live longer, we must join in calling for a radical reform of the economic system. All persons should be liberated from the necessity of the toil of work. Every human being should be guaranteed an income, healthcare, and life-long access to education.

We must join in working for the expansion of rights to all persons, human or not.

We must join with movements working to reduce existential risks, educating them about emerging threats they don’t yet take seriously, and proposing ways that emerging technologies can help reduce those risks. Transnational cooperation can meet the man-made and natural threats that we face.

It is time for technoprogressives to step forward and work together for a brighter future.

Signators (in formation- contact director@ieet.org to add your name/organization):

Organizational:

Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association
De:Trans (German Transhumanist Association)
Zero State/Institute for Social Futurism
Terasem Movement
Alianza Futurista (Spain)
Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
Transhumanist [H+] Research & Media Center

Individual:

Australia
Adam Ford, President, Science Technology & the Future, Board member, Humanity+
Russell Blackford, Ph.D., LL.B., philosopher and author, University of Newcastle, NSW

Belgium
Didier Cournelle, Vice-Pres., Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association; co-chair, HEALES

Canada
George Dvorsky, IEET Board Chair, journalist

Estonia
David Latapie, Treasurer, Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association

France
Marc Roux, Spokesperson, Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association
Olivier Nerot, Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association
Cyril Gazengel, Technoprog-French Transhumanist Association

Germany
Günter Bachelier, Ph.D., Computer Artist
Daniel Wuttke, Chair, De:Trans (German Transhumanist Association)

Hungary
Giulio Prisco, IEET Board, Italian Transhumanist Association

India
Avinash Singh, founder, India Future Society

Israel
Ilia Stambler, PhD., Chair, Israeli Longevity Alliance

Italy
Giancarlo Stile Ph.D., Coordinator, Italian Transhumanist Network
Stefano Vaj, Secretary, Italian Transhumanist Association
Riccardo Campa Ph.D., Chair, Italian Transhumanist Association & Sociology, Jagiellonian University
David De Biasi, Co-founder of Italian Transhumanist Network
Bruno Formicola, Member, Italian Transhumanist Network

Serbia
Milan Ćirković Ph.D., Physics, University of Novi Sad

Spain
Sergio Tarrero, President, Alianza Futurista
Javier Ruiz Alvarez, Alianza Futurista

UK
David Wood D.Sc., chair London Futurists, Board member, Humanity+
Steve Fuller Ph.D., Prof. Sociology, University of Warwick, England
Naomi Curtis, Cardiff, United Kingdom
Alexander Karran Ph.D., Liverpool John Moores University
Amon Twyman Ph.D., organizer Zero State/Institute for Social Futurism
Olga Pavlovska, London Futurist
Julian Snape Cert Ed., Norfolk & London Futurist’

USA
Natasha Vita-More Ph.D., Chair, Humanity+, Fellow, IEET
Martine Rothblatt Ph.D., J.D., founder, Terasem Movement
PJ Manney, author and futurist
Hank Pellissier, Brighter Brains Institute
John Smart, President, Acceleration Studies Foundation
Paul Eckstein, Philosophy, Columbia College
John G Messerly Ph.D, philosopher
Susan Schneider Ph.D., Philosophy, University of Connecticut
Philippe van Nedervelde, Director of International Development, 2045 Initiative
Ken Goffman aka R.U. Sirius, Author/Editor/Publisher
B.J. Murphy, Editor, Serious Wonder
Stuart Mason Dambrot, Synthesist, Futurist, Board member, Humanity+
Linda M. Glenn, J.D. LL.M., Cal State U Monterey Bay, Alden March Bioethics Institute, Board, Humanity+
Bryce Alexander Lynch, Member, Zero State
Kent Gemre
J. Hughes Ph.D., Executive Director, Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
Kris Notaro, Managing Director, Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
Michael LaTorra, IEET Board, English, New Mexico State University
Mark Walker Ph.D., IEET Board, Philosophy, New Mexico State University
Jonathan Lyons M.F.A., IEET Affiliate Scholar
Franco Cortese, IEET Affiliate Scholar
Nathan A. Sonnenfeld; Human Factors researcher, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Alex Hamilton, Government Fishbowl
Mark Larkento, Member, Zero State
Jon Perry, Review the Future podcast
Ted Kupper, Review the Future podcast
Frazer Kirkman, Memetic engineer and Founder of United Visions
Rob Boyle, Posthuman Studios

Additional readings:

Overview of Biopolitics

TransVision 2014 - “What is Technoprogressive Thought? Origins, Principles, Agendas” James Hughes (Nov 22, 2014)

“Values and objectives of the French techno-progressivism” Marc Roux (2013)

David Wood Explains Technoprogressivism (2013)

“Towards a Transhumanist Techno-progressive Divorce” Rick Searle (Aug 20, 2013)

“Live Long and Prosper: A Program of Technoprogressive Social Democracy” Dale Carrico (July 31, 2005)

“TechnoProgressive Biopolitics and Human Enhancement,” J. Hughes, Progress in Bioethics, ed. Jonathan Moreno and Sam Berger, 2010, MIT Press, pp. 163-188

“Technoprogressives and Transhumanists: What’s the difference?” Mike Treder (Jun 25, 2009)

“Who are the Technoprogressives?” J. Hughes (Jul 14, 2013)

“Transhumanism, Technoprogressivism and Singularitarianism: What are the Differences?” J. Hughes (Jul 28, 2013)

 

 

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John Danaher

Neuroenhancement and the Extended Mind Hypothesis

by John Danaher

Consider your smartphone for a moment. It provides you with access to a cornucopia of information. Some of it is general, stored on publicly accessible internet sites, and capable of being called up to resolve any pub debate one might be having (how many U.S. presidents have been assassinated? or how many times have Brazil won the World Cup?). Some of it is more personal, and includes a comprehensive databank of all emails and text message conversations you have had, your calendar appointments, the number of steps you have taken on any given day, books read, films watched, calories consumed and so forth.

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John G. Messerly

Transhumanism and Religion

by John G. Messerly

Transhumanism is: The intellectual and cultural movement that affirms the possibility and desirability of fundamentally improving the human condition through applied reason, especially by developing and making widely available technologies to eliminate aging and to greatly enhance human intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities … transhumanism is a way of thinking about the future that is based on the premise that the human species in its current form does not represent the end of our development but rather a comparatively early phase.1

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Humanities and the Science of Learning: Revealing the essence of human thought (1hr)

CITE

Professor Laura Ann Petitto, a Cognitive Neuroscientist, is the Co-Principal Investigator, and Science Director, of the National Science Foundation’s Science of Learning Center, “Visual Language and Visual Learning, VL2” at Gallaudet University. She is also a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Gallaudet, an affiliated Professor in the Department of Psychology at Georgetown University, and the Scientific Director of her own Brain and Language Laboratory for Neuroimaging. She is known for her role in the creation of the new discipline, Educational Neuroscience, and is one of the Co-Founders of the PhD in Educational Neuroscience at Gallaudet University. She is known for her scientific discoveries concerning language and its neural representation in the human brain, how young children acquire language, the shared signed and spoken language processing sites and systems in the human brain, the bilingual brain, and the reading brain.

Petitto received her Masters and Doctoral degrees from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, Department of Human Development and Psychology (Language and Cognition Track) in 1981 and 1984 (Ed.M. and Ed.D. respectfully). Petitto has won continuous Federal and/or Foundation funding for the past 30 years. She is the recipient of over 35 international prizes and awards for her scientific achievements and discoveries, including the 1998 Guggenheim Award for her “unusually distinguished achievements in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment” (Neurosciences category). In 2009, Petitto was appointed a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

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Understanding the self through self bias (46min)

CITE

“I am a cognitive neuropsychologist with research interests covering: the diagnosis and management of cognitive problems after brain injury, visual attention, perception, language and the control of action, social cognition. I have published over 500 papers in international journals and 16 books. I have been awarded the Spearman Medal, the Prize for Cognitive Psychology (twice), and the President’s Award of the British Psychological Society, the Donald Broadbent Prize from the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, a Humboldt Fellowship, the Leibniz Professorship and Special Professorship of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. I am a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences, the Royal Society of Medicine, the Academy of Social Sciences and the British Academy. I have edited the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Visual Cognition (founding Editor) and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. I am currently Watts professor of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford.”

“Current main research inserted:

The control of attention in perception and action, particularly in relation to cues to action in the environment and to social associations. My research uses multiple techniques including: neuropsychogical and experimental studies, structural and functional brain imaging (fMRI, EEG), trans-cranial magnetic and direct current brain stimulation and computational modelling.” - www.psy.ox.ac.uk

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Analogy, Causality, and Discovery in Science: The engines of human thought (1hr 20min)

CITE

Kevin Niall Dunbar is Professor of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland College Park. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the National University of Ireland (Dublin) and his PhD from the University of Toronto. Professor Dunbar is renowned for his research on the ways that scientists think, reason, and interact while they are making discoveries and inventing new technologies. Over the past twenty-five years he has focused on the heuristics that scientists use to construct theories, design experiments, invent new technologies, and make scientific discoveries as well as the development of scientific thinking skills in in children. Specifically, he focuses on reasoning strategies such as analogy, causality and their application in adults, children and scientists. Professor Dunbar uses three converging methodologies to explore scientific thinking. First, he conducts naturalistic observations of scientists in their labs, students in undergraduate laboratory classes, and visitors to science museums (usually families). Second, he conducts experiments with students generating theories, conducting experiments, and interpreting data.

Third, he conducts neuroimaging research on students as they learn about Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Specific topics of his research have been the roles of unexpected results in fostering discovery and invention, Gender in the scientific laboratory, and the roles of analogy and causal thinking in discovery and invention. He has published in the fields of Educational Neuroscience, Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, and Education. In addition to publications in academic forums, his work on discovery has been featured in WIRED magazine, Time ideas, and the Washington Post, to mention a few. He regularly speaks in North America and Europe on the topics of creativity,the effects of learning science on the brain, and how to improve scientific thought in schools, universities, and industry.

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Insights from The Science of Learning & Educational Neuroscience (1hr 10min)

CITE

Kevin Niall Dunbar is Professor of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland College Park. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the National University of Ireland (Dublin) and his PhD from the University of Toronto. Professor Dunbar is renowned for his research on the ways that scientists think, reason, and interact while they are making discoveries and inventing new technologies. Over the past twenty-five years he has focused on the heuristics that scientists use to construct theories, design experiments, invent new technologies, and make scientific discoveries as well as the development of scientific thinking skills in in children. Specifically, he focuses on reasoning strategies such as analogy, causality and their application in adults, children and scientists. Professor Dunbar uses three converging methodologies to explore scientific thinking. First, he conducts naturalistic observations of scientists in their labs, students in undergraduate laboratory classes, and visitors to science museums (usually families). Second, he conducts experiments with students generating theories, conducting experiments, and interpreting data.

Third, he conducts neuroimaging research on students as they learn about Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Specific topics of his research have been the roles of unexpected results in fostering discovery and invention, Gender in the scientific laboratory, and the roles of analogy and causal thinking in discovery and invention. He has published in the fields of Educational Neuroscience, Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, and Education. In addition to publications in academic forums, his work on discovery has been featured in WIRED magazine, Time ideas, and the Washington Post, to mention a few. He regularly speaks in North America and Europe on the topics of creativity,the effects of learning science on the brain, and how to improve scientific thought in schools, universities, and industry.

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Tery Spataro

You Are the Master of Your Universe!

by Tery Spataro

If you attended CES 2015, you probably found it was stuffed with the excitement of connected devices, homes, cars, robots and even drones! While record numbers of attendees embarked on CES 2015, I observed every few seconds Twitter buzzing with enthusiasm and wonder for automating routines and tasks will improve our lives. This year’s conference let us in on what is and what will be our future, – at least our future for the next few years. My observations cause me to conclude:

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John Danaher

#1 Editor’s Choice Award: Rule by Algorithm? Big Data and the Threat of Algocracy

by John Danaher

An increasing number of people are worried about the way in which our data is being mined by governments and corporations. One of these people is Evgeny Morozov. In an article that appeared in the MIT Technology Review back in October 2013, he argued that this trend poses a serious threat to democracy, one that should be resisted through political activism and “sabotage”. As it happens, I have written about similar threats to democracy myself in the past, so I was interested to see how Morozov defended his view.

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Andrew Maynard

World Economic Forum highlights risks of emerging technologies

by Andrew Maynard

The challenges of governing emerging technologies are highlighted by the World Economic Forum in the 2015 edition of its Global Risks Report. Focusing in particular on synthetic biology, gene drives and artificial intelligence, the report warns that these and other emerging technologies present hard-to-foresee risks, and that oversight mechanisms need to more effectively balance likely benefits and commercial demands with a deeper consideration of ethical questions and medium to long-term risks.

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Leo Igwe

Boko Haram and the Politics of Fighting Jihadists in Nigeria

by Leo Igwe

As world leaders gathered at the French capital to march in solidarity with France following a brutal attack on its citizens by terrorists, something far more atrocious and horrifying in scale and severity unfolded in north-east Nigeria. Boko Haram militants massacred over 2000 persons, mainly women, children and elderly people.

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John G. Messerly

Can Life Have Meaning Without Gods?

by John G. Messerly

John Cottingham was born in London in 1943 and received his PhD from Oxford University. He is presently Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Reading and an Honorary Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford. He is a proponent today of the view that life is meaningless without a god.

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AFL-CIO Raising Wages Summit

AFL -CIO

Elizabeth Ann Warren[2] (née Herring; born June 22, 1949[3]) is an American academic and politician who is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. She was previously a Harvard Law School professor specializing in bankruptcy law. Warren is an active consumer protection advocate whose work led to the conception and establishment of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. She has written a number of academic and popular works, and is a frequent subject of media interviews regarding the American economy and personal finance.

Following the 2008 financial crisis, Warren served as chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel created to oversee the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). She later served as Assistant to the President and Special Advisor to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under President Barack Obama. During the late 2000s, she was recognized by publications such as the National Law Journal and the Time 100 as an increasingly influential public policy figure.

In September 2011, Warren announced her candidacy for the U.S. Senate, challenging Republican incumbent Scott Brown. She won the general election on November 6, 2012, becoming the first female Senator from Massachusetts. She was assigned to the Senate Special Committee on Aging; the Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee; and the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.

Warren has been described as a leading figure in the Democratic Party and among American progressives,[4][5] and has frequently been mentioned by political pundits as a potential 2016 presidential candidate despite Warren’s repeated statements that she is not running for president.[6][7] - Wikipedia

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Marcelo Rinesi

And Call it Justice (Science Fiction)

by Marcelo Rinesi

In a Texas left empty by global warming, the last outlaw and the last lawman face each other over a crime that might be too big for justice.

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