Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies


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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Overview of technopolitics


whats new at ieet

Trump Picks Establishment Banker For Treasury Secretary

Trump’s Pick for Health Secretary Is Total Nightmare Fuel

First Republican “Hamilton Elector” Breaks Ranks Against Trump

Cybathlon 2016 : entre sport, handicap et transhumanisme

U.S. To Forgive $108 Billion In Student Debt

The informal sector Singularity


ieet books

TECHNOPROG, le transhumanisme au service du progrès social
Author
Marc Roux and Didier Coeurnelle

Philosophical Ethics: Theory and Practice
John G Messerly

eHuman Deception
Nicole Sallak Anderson

Keywords for Environmental Studies
eds. Joni Adamson, William A. Gleason, David N. Pellow





JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life


RSS feedETHICAL TECHNOLOGY


Sad News: Ben Hyink

Ben Hyink was a passionate transhumanist and secular activist, and an intern and intern coordinator with the IEET. He helped organize and lead the Humanity+ Student Network (H+SN) and the Chicago chapter of Humanity+, co-wrote the “Humanity+ Student Leadership Guide,”, and was the recipient of the 2007 JBS Haldane award for outstanding Transhumanist Student of the year. Having struggled with depression he ended his life last week.

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Marios Kyriazis

The Myth of the Longevity Elixir

by Marios Kyriazis

The search for a single elixir or combination of elixirs, which can allow substantial longevity, is false.

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Brave New Nano: Flexible phones & graphene gadgets in RT’s

RT News

What exactly is ‘nano’? It’s become a buzzword, spawning many gimmicky products over the recent years, but what role will the real nano technology play in our lives? From smart metro tickets to futuristic flexible electronics, RT’s Technology Update’s got the future covered.

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Our Thoughts With IEET Readers Affected by Hurricane Sandy

As of this morning millions of people in the Northeast of the United States are still without power, and many are stranded in homes damaged by flooding with transportation blocked by fallen trees. We hope you are all safe and restored as soon as possible.

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Can We Control the Weather?

Michio Kaku

Will we be able to control the weather within 100 years?

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Giulio Prisco

How to make Cosmism appealing and popular

by Giulio Prisco

Cosmism, in its modern version formulated by Ben Goertzel in his wonderful book A Cosmist Manifesto, is my personal philosophy. Two very interesting recent discussions on the KurzweilAI Forums, “Why New Agers will never accept Terasem” and “Cosmism, Terasem etc. – what is the missing ingredient?,” have interesting thoughts on how to make it more appealing and popular.

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Message to the Future

Bertrand Russell

Interviewer: What would you think it’s worth telling future generations about the life you’ve lived and the lessons you’ve learned from it?

Russell: “I should like to say two things, one intellectual and one moral. The intellectual thing I should want to say is this: When you are studying any matter, or considering any philosophy, ask yourself only what are the facts and what is the truth that the facts bear out. Never let yourself be diverted either by what you wish to believe, or by what you think would have beneficent social effects if it were believed. But look only, and solely, at what are the facts. That is the intellectual thing that I should wish to say.

The moral thing I should wish to say… I should say love is wise, hatred is foolish. In this world which is getting more closely and closely interconnected we have to learn to tolerate each other, we have to learn to put up with the fact that some people say things that we don’t like. We can only live together in that way and if we are to live together and not die together we must learn a kind of charity and a kind of tolerance which is absolutely vital to the continuation of human life on this planet.”

From Wikipedia:

“Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, and social critic. At various points in his life he considered himself a liberal, a socialist, and a pacifist, but he also admitted that he had never been any of these in any profound sense. He was born in Monmouthshire, into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in Britain.

Russell led the British “revolt against idealism” in the early 20th century. He is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege and his protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein. He is widely held to be one of the 20th century’s premier logicians. He co-authored, with A. N. Whitehead, Principia Mathematica, an attempt to ground mathematics on logic. His philosophical essay “On Denoting” has been considered a “paradigm of philosophy.” His work has had a considerable influence on logic, mathematics, set theory, linguistics, computer science (see type theory and type system), and philosophy, especially philosophy of language, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Russell was a prominent anti-war activist; he championed anti-imperialism and went to prison for his pacifism during World War I. Later, he campaigned against Adolf Hitler, then criticised Stalinist totalitarianism, attacked the United States of America’s involvement in the Vietnam War, and was an outspoken proponent of nuclear disarmament. In 1950 Russell was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, “in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought.”

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A Tour of the Cell

Paul Andersen

Paul Andersen takes you on a tour of the cell. He starts by explaining the difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. He also explains why cells are small but not infinitely small. He also explains how the organelles work together in a similar fashion.

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Marcelo Rinesi

When Hope is Unethical

by Marcelo Rinesi

With the best of intentions, climate scientists might be doing an ethical disservice to the world.

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The complicated life of a disk galaxy

NASA

This cosmological simulation follows the development of a single disk galaxy over about 13.5 billion years, from shortly after the Big Bang to the present time.

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David Brin

Existence, Uplift, and Science News

by David Brin

David Brin here, coming back for one of my infrequent guest blogs. Amid the election, I’ll alternate political posts (also to be found at http://davidbrin.blogspot.com/) with others about science, fiction and the future.  And so, for relief, let’s have a miscellany of cool techie stuff!

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UCSF Memory and Aging

Dr. Bruce Miller

What can we do about dementia? What is the basic foundations of understanding it scientifically?

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David Brin

Do the U.S. 2012 elections reflect the Fermi Paradox? The empty Galaxy?

by David Brin

The Fermi Paradox is the question of why we seem to be alone in our neck of the universe. Why don’t we observe any blatant signs of intelligent life in the cosmos, including the great works that our own descendants may begin to build, if we give them a good start in the right direction?

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Jonathan Lin

“Caught In The Web” - Netizen Flames in Chinese Cinema

by Jonathan Lin

One review of renowned Chinese director Chen Kaige’s most recent film Caught In The Web (2012) called it “a contemporary social drama about online witchhunts.”

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Marcelo Rinesi

Pro Specie Mori

by Marcelo Rinesi

There’s a direct argument to be made for a corps of volunteer human guinea pigs.

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David Brin

A Conversation About Political Maturity: Is it Possible?

by David Brin

I want to share with you an excerpt from a conversation I recently had with a woman I very much respect. Lenore Ealy is one of America’s premier theoreticians on the nature and prospects for enlightened philanthropy. 

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Konza Technology City

New African World

Konza Technology City is a project planned to create an African Silicon Valley in Nairobi,Kenya. Dubbed the Silicon Savannah the vision for the city includes a strong emphasis on Information Technology and Information Technology Enabled Services (ITES); and a wide range of commercial and support activities.

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Russell Blackford

Atheism, Philosophy and Morality (interview by Rational Hub)

by Russell Blackford

IEET Fellow Russell Blackford, an Australian philosopher and critic, is queried on the relationship between religion and science, “moral error theory” and multiple other topics.

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Lee-Roy Chetty

Africa’s 2040 Employment Problem

by Lee-Roy Chetty

Over the last decade, six of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies were in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, there are troubling indicators that this exponential growth has not resulted in robust growth of “good” jobs.

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Dick Pelletier

82 Years of Technology Advances; but best yet to come

by Dick Pelletier

Eighty two years is a mere blink in history’s eye, but since October 26, 1930 when I first arrived on this planet, I’ve watched many changes take place; some that seemed amazing at the time.

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Worldchanging, Open the Future

BIL Talks

The crux of the talk is an elaboration on a “second uncanny valley” idea Jamais Cascio wrote about.

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Valerie Tarico

Does Romney’s Religious Devotion Make Him More or Less Trustworthy?

by Valerie Tarico

Does religion make people more trustworthy? Most religious people like to think so.

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Arthur Caplan

Ethicist: Fixing genes using cloning technique is worth the ethical risk

by Arthur Caplan

A team of scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center and the Oregon Health & Science University are reporting a remarkable advance in the treatment of inherited genetic disease in the journal Nature.

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Marcelo Rinesi

From Illegal Data to Illegal Thoughts

by Marcelo Rinesi

An aggregation of irrelevant data is far from irrelevant; some forms of privacy don’t depend on it being illegal to know certain things, but on it being illegal to correlate — that is, to think orderly about — them.

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New Nanotechnology Makes Fabric Stab Proof

Allseen TV

The new advancement in lightweight body armor is the result of research that Army and University of Delaware scientists began more than a decade ago. ARL Inside explores the development and testing of shear thickening fluid, a nanotechnology invention that, when applied to fabric like Kevlar, for example, prevents pointed weapons like spikes or ice picks from penetrating between its yarns, and generally helps to hold yarns and fibers in place during attacks from pointed weapons or projectiles. Someday, researchers say, this liquid could be used to treat Soldier uniforms, particularly sleeves and pants, which are not protected by ballistic vests, and have to stay flexible.

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David Brin

Has 21st Century Science Fiction Gone Cowardly? Or Worse… Nostalgic?

by David Brin

Jonathan McCalmont is a critic of popular culture and science fiction whom I’ll be watching. Not because I especially liked or agreed with his lengthy and rather incoherent screed: “Cowardice, Laziness and Irony: How Science Fiction Lost the Future.”

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Lee-Roy Chetty

Investment Flows Back into Africa

by Lee-Roy Chetty

Over the past 10 years, foreign direct investment (FDI) has helped boost sustainable economic growth in many African countries.

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Valkyrie McGill

The RTU (Remote Telepresence Unit) Is Born

by Valkyrie McGill

Considering the sheer number of times I get told I’m insane by people who refuse to believe the possibilities I discuss for the various technologies I write about, it’s hard to resist the occasional “I told you so.”

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Kris Notaro

Existentialism and Existential Threats: a Fascinating Merging of Human Thought

by Kris Notaro

What happens when you mix Sartre’s Existentialism with Existential Risks? Human responsibility and being true to oneself (not lying to oneself) becomes a center point for experts, “leaders”, intellectuals, and all of rational humanity.

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CHARLI Robot Gangnam Style

RoMeLa

The CHARLI series humanoid robot is developed as a research platform to study bipedal walking and autonomous behaviors for humanoid robots. It is designed to be ultra light weight (under 15 kgs) for safety and low cost. As the next generation of the CHARLI series humanoid robots, CHARLI-2 improves stability and speed in walking, intelligence and autonomy, and soccer playing skills. CHARLI-L2 is also designed to participate in the autonomous robot soccer competition, RoboCup, in the Adult size league.
CHARLI-2 implements an impressive active stabilization strategy based on sensory feedback (filtered IMU angles, gyro rate readings and proprioception information based on joint encoders.) Stabilizing torques at the ankle joints are applied based on this information, and successful ly rejects external disturbances. CHARLI-2 is honored “2011 Best Invention of the Year” by Time magazine, won the Louis Vuitton Best Humanoid Award (a.k.a. Louis Vuitton Cup) at RoboCup 2011, and won First Place in AdultSize league for autonomous soccer at both RoboCup 2011 and RoboCup 2012 among many awards.

And now…
CHARLI does Gangnam Style…

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