Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Location



MULTIMEDIA: Location Topics

An AfroFuturist in Oakland

Finding Future X in Cape Town

Ebola: The 2014 Outbreak Explained

Meet BRCK, Internet access built for Africa

African Technology and the Future

Konza Technology City

The Rise of an African Tiger Economy

‪Hello Africa - Mobile Phone Culture in Africa‬

Cellphones to Africa

‪Cindy: The Promise of Africa’s Future‬

‪The Making of an African Activist‬

Taps and Toilets

Africa Futures Project

Occupy South Africa

Paul Collier on why sub-Saharan Africa is falling behind




Subscribe to IEET Lists

Daily News Feed

Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List









Location Topics




Report on Nigeria ICT Festival 2015

by Agbolade Omowole

Mascot Information and Technology Solutions held the maiden edition of Nigeria ICT Fest on December 4, 2015 at Magrellos fast food, Festac Town, Lagos, and December 5, 2015 at Radisson Blu Anchorage hotel at No. 1A, Ozumba Mbadiwe Avenue, Victoria Island, Lagos, to bridge the technology gap between Nigeria and the developed world.

Full Story...



#26: Atheism in Zambia - skeptical, rational thought in a very superstitious country

by Leo Igwe

According to IEET readers, what were the most stimulating stories of 2015? This month we’re answering that question by posting a countdown of the top 30 articles published this year on our blog (out of more than 1,000), based on how many total hits each one received.

The following piece was first published here on June 23, 2015, and is the #26 most viewed of the year.

Full Story...



China’s Huge Investment in Africa — Where is this Alliance Headed?

by Michael Lee

China recently pledged $60 billion “of assistance and loans for Africa to help with the development of the continent.”  This adds to a previous investment of $200 billion over the last forty years.  China’s leaders regularly visit African nations where they are lavishly praised and it is evident that the two regions are destined for an intertwined future.

Full Story...



Approaching Zero: How West Africa is Crushing the Ebola Epidemic

by George Dvorsky

The West African Ebola outbreak is finally starting to approach manageable levels, after nearly 18 excruciating months and over 11,000 lost lives. Here’s what the current situation on the ground looks like and how the battle against Ebola finally might be won.

This is the largest and longest Ebola outbreak in human history. At its peak, there were 950 confirmed cases each week, prompting fears of a global pandemic. Officials have reported 28,421 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Of these, some 11,300 people have died — a fatality rate of 40%. A total of 881 healthcare workers have been infected; of those, 513 died.

Full Story...



The Future of SubSaharan Africa - interview with Michael Lee

by Michael Lee

Michael Lee is a futurist who founded the World Future Society’s Southern African Chapter and the Institute of Futurology. He’s also an IEET contributing writer.  His point-of-view is an essential contribution to IEET’s African Futures Project.

Full Story...



Big Red Earth Rises: a Novel NGO for Sustainable Development in Madagascar

by Dustin Eirdosh

In 2012 I formed a collaboration between IEET, the EvoS Consortium, and Madagascar’s southwestern University of Toliara - to form the highly experimental Positive Education Action-Research (PEAR) Laboratory.  Under this umbrella, I worked with students in education sciences and agricultural sciences to explore everything from the big history of the cosmos, to the moral and political psychology of agricultural biotechnology.

Full Story...



Reverse Missionaries: Are African Churches Exporting Homophobia to the West?

by Leo Igwe

In recent years, the issue of gay rights in Africa has generated intense debate and discussions. Some countries have tried to tighten the laws against homosexuality and prohibit same sex marriage. They claim homosexuality is an evil, corrupt and immoral lifestyle which western societies are trying to impose on African nations.

Full Story...



Against Sainthood for Benedict Daswa: Why Replace Sangoma Witchcraft with Catholic Witchcraft?

by Leo Igwe

I am against the ongoing efforts and campaign by the Catholic Church to make the late South African schoolteacher, Benedict Daswa, a saint. While I acknowledge the heroic struggle waged by Daswa against witchcraft based violence and exploitation of his Venda people, a struggle that eventually led to his brutal murder; while I understand the need to celebrate and commemorate his life, legacy and achievement, this initiative to make him an object of ‘worship’ or reverence by the catholic establishment is a self-serving scheme and is literally an insult on the memory of this critical and courageous mind.

Full Story...



Heart of Humanism Award and Witch-hunts in Africa

by Leo Igwe

Thank you Foundation Beyond Belief for selecting me as the recipient of the Heart of Humanism Award for 2015. I believe I have just received the best award the world has to offer. 

Superstition confuses the mind. It distorts reality, hardens the conscience and poisons the heart. Irrational belief drains the well of human compassion causing suffering, death, darkness and destruction. As Voltaire once noted, “Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities”.

Full Story...



The Misogyny Behind Witchcraft Accusations

by Leo Igwe

In the North of Ghana, among the Dagomba, the name for a witch is Sonya, and a wizard is Bukpaha. But in local discourse there is often no reference to Bukpaha. Sonya is commonly used to refer to a person, male or female (though largely female), who engages in malevolent magic.

Another Dagomba term for Sonya is Pakurugu, which means an old woman, or as the English speaking Dagomba say, an ‘old lady’. Among the Dagomba, the notion of witchcraft has a female face. Men are more often perceived as ‘doctors’ with the cure for witchcraft.

Full Story...



6 Astounding Ways Africa Is Paving the Way for the Future of Technology

by Jack Smith IV

Every week, the American tech sector uses the most advanced mobile technologies in the world to create some new meaningless distraction. Tinder for dogs, Airbnb for boats, Yo — all sorts of luxury convenience tools created to manufacture and solve problems that don’t exist and extract some in-app purchases along the way.

Full Story...



The Politics Of Gay Marriage In Nigeria

by Leo Igwe

President Muhammad Buhari has stated during his recent visit to the US that his government would not consider decriminalizing gay marriage in Nigeria. Well, that did not come to me as a surprise because President Buhari is a hardline conservative muslim whom I think would be unwilling to support any legislative or policy change that is not compatible with sharia law.

Full Story...



Humanism And Anti-Intellectualism In Nigeria

by Leo Igwe

A lot has been said about militant Islam and extreme Christian, traditional religious practices in Nigeria. There has been much focus on violent attacks by the jihadist group, Boko Haram, on the abuses perpetrated by sharia policing agencies and the nefarious activities of homophobic pentecostal churches and witch hunting pastors in the country. Unfortunately not much attention has been paid to the efforts of humanists, atheists, skeptics and agnostics in the country to address these problems. Not many Nigerians know about the campaigns by humanists against witch hunting, blasphemy law and harmful traditional practices. In fact not many Nigerians know that humanists and humanist groups exist in the country.

Full Story...



Africa’s Population Explosion: 5.6 Billion Forecast by 2100 - is this Catastrophic?

by Hank Pellissier

A recent United Nations study predicts Africa’s population will more than quadruple in the next 85 years, rising from today’s 1.2 billion to 5.6 billion.

Africans, if the present trend continues, will comprise 50% of the global population of 11 billion, by 2100.

The study, released by the UN Population Division director, John R. Wilmoth, in Seattle, suggests that Nigeria’s population will leap from today’s 182 million to 752 million people.

Full Story...



Biafra Survives: the Igbo people, 45 years after the Civil War

by Hank Pellissier

The Biafra Civil War from 1967-1970 resulted when the small West African region – primarily populated by the Igbo tribe – attempted to secede from Nigeria, a former British colony.  An estimated 1-2 million people were killed in the conflict; 40% were Igbo children who died of starvation and malnutrition. The Igbo thought the global community would support them, but they gained little assistance, whereas Nigeria was massively armed by the British and Russians. Biafra was invaded and the Igbo were eventually subdued.

How are the Igbo doing today?  Have they survived economically? Are they participating in Nigerian political affairs?  Have enmities been forgiven?

Full Story...



“H+ Clinic” is 100% Funded - Transhumanitarian Project in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

“Transhumanitarians” have contributed hundreds of dollars via a GoFundMe campaign to establish a “H+ Clinic” in an isolated Ruwenzori mountain village of western Uganda.

Full Story...



Child Witchcraft Accusations in Ivory Coast

by Leo Igwe

Ivory Coast is one of the countries in Africa where belief is witchcraft is widespread. A Gallup Poll found in 2010 that up to 95 percent of the populations believed in “sorciellerie” – the French word for witchcraft. This means that witchcraft is more or less a ‘national religion’. Almost everyone in the country thinks as a matter of fact, not fantasy that witchcraft is real in its conception and consequences, that people can harm others using mystical means.

Full Story...



Transhumanists Helping the Ugandan Mountain Community of Kyarumba

by R. Dennis Hansen

The small community of Kyarumba, Uganda, is located in the southern end of Rwenzori Mountains (aka Mountains of the Moon).  It straddles a wild river that is prone to flooding.  The community recently got electricity.

Full Story...



Media and Critical Reporting of Traditional Medicine Claims in Africa

by Leo Igwe

African traditional medicine is widely perceived as a form of voodoo medicine, as a survival of some stone age pre-modern illiterate formation that still functions and fulfills medical purposes for Africans. This is, at least, how many anthropologists have viewed the subject. They have argued that African traditional medicine is unlike ‘western medicine’, and then go on to establish how witchcraft and magic is embedded in this ‘unique’ medical practice. African medicine men and women are portrayed as witch doctors - as if the traditional-medical profession is about treating and curing witchcraft.

Full Story...



Atheism in Zambia - skeptical, rational thought in a very superstitious country

by Leo Igwe

Like other countries in Africa, Zambia is a very religious nation and has the dubious of distinction of being officially declared a Christian nation by President Federick Chiluba in 1996. One need not look far to see where Chiluba got the political will to establish this Christian nation. Eighty seven percent of the population is Christian and only twelve percent profess other faiths. The number of non-believers is too low to measure. Apparently, Zambia is 100 percent religious and theistic.

Full Story...



Computer Training Center installed in Masaka, Uganda - technoprogress in Africa

by R. Dennis Hansen

In January (2015), my son-in-law and grandson installed a small computer-training facility in a LDS Chapel in Masaka, Uganda.  The LDS chapel was chosen for several reasons:

Full Story...



Installing Swing Sets in the Gulu Area, Uganda

by R. Dennis Hansen

A few years ago, Gulu was the center of an ugly uprising that left northern Uganda in dire straights.  Since the defeat of the rebel group–the Lord’s Resistance Army–the area is in recovery, but is still poor.

Our objectives in being in the Gulu area were threefold:

Full Story...



African Development: Is Kicking Out Christianity and Islam the Answer?

by Leo Igwe

I state right away that I do not think “Kicking Christianity and Islam out of Africa” is the Answer. Why do I believe this will not lead to development in Africa?

Full Story...



Albino Killings and Humanism in Malawi

by Leo Igwe

Four persons suspected of murdering an ‘albino’ have reportedly been arrested in Malawi. They allegedly abducted an ‘albino’ man from his village, killed him, removed his body parts and buried them in a riverbed. These horrific murders which have been taking place mainly in Tanzania seem to be spreading to this Southern African country, and it is important to rally Malawians against this horrendous practice before it is too late.

Full Story...



Ritual Killing and Skepticism in Zambia

by Leo Igwe

Zambia has just recorded its ‘first case’ of albino killing. Suspected ritualists butchered a 37 year old albino woman in the eastern district of Lundazi. They cut off her right hand and extracted the teeth from her mouth. In Zambia, ritual murder is on the rise.

Full Story...



Albino Killings, Witchcraft, And Political Elections In Tanzania

by Leo Igwe

If you are one of those who think there is no connection between politics and the savage practice of albino killing in Tanzania, then you need to read the recent statement from the Deputy Minister for Home Affairs, Pereira Silima. Silima made it clear to politicians in the country that if they stopped patronizing the ‘witch doctors’ then this East African country might see an end to the shameful and horrific murders of albinos.

The people in Tanzania need to discard the belief that drives them to attack kidnap and kill people living with albinism.

Full Story...



Pre-owned “American Girl Dolls” are Recycled to Support Girls Education in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

An innovative project that recycles the popular American Girl Dolls is raising funds to help Uganda girls stay in school.

“World Girl Dolls” is capitalizing on the immense popularity and resale value of American Girl Dolls. The project, organized by Zenobia Lloyd (11-years-old) works like this:

Full Story...



What a Concept: Alleviating Poverty by Giving Money to the Poor

by Douglas Cruickshank

After I’d been living in rural Africa for a few months, I remarked to an American friend, “Based on careful analysis, I’ve discovered why people here are so poor: They don’t have any money.”

Poor people don’t have money. When they get money they become less poor. Sounds staggeringly obvious, but you’d be surprised how convoluted, dysfunctional and tangled up in bureaucracy that equation becomes once governments and the big foreign aid organizations—the Do-Gooder Industrial Complex—get involved.

Full Story...



What Happened When Liberia Tested a Pilot Program of Cash Transfers to the Extreme Poor in Bomi?

by Scott Santens

Further evidence of the potential of basic income

I’m always on the lookout for more scientific evidence of what happens when people are provided cash incomes unconditionally. Recently I found something new, a pilot program tested in Bomi and Maryland Counties in Liberia that started in 2009 and ended in late 2014.

Implemented by the Liberian Ministry of Gender and Development with support from UNICEF and funded by the EU and Japan, it was called the “Social Cash Transfer Programme (SCT)” and was aimed at the “ultra-poor” - the poorest of the poor.

Full Story...



Three Transhumanist Organizations Fund “Science & Literacy Centre” in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

The Mormon Transhumanist Association (MTA) members of the Christian Transhumanist Association,  and Alcor Life Extension Foundation  have teamed up to establish a “Science & Literacy Centre” in Kyarumba, a small village in western Uganda. The project has attained 100% of its funding via generous individuals who donated money primarily at the GoFundMe campaign site.

Full Story...

Page 1 of 6 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

HOME | ABOUT | FELLOWS | STAFF | EVENTS | SUPPORT  | CONTACT US
SECURING THE FUTURE | LONGER HEALTHIER LIFE | RIGHTS OF THE PERSON | ENVISIONING THE FUTURE
CYBORG BUDDHA PROJECT | AFRICAN FUTURES PROJECT | JOURNAL OF EVOLUTION AND TECHNOLOGY

RSSIEET Blog | email list | newsletter |
The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States.

East Coast Contact: Executive Director, Dr. James J. Hughes,
56 Daleville School Rd., Willington CT 06279 USA 
Email: director @ ieet.org     phone: 860-428-1837

West Coast Contact: Managing Director, Hank Pellissier
425 Moraga Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611
Email: hank @ ieet.org