Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Location



MULTIMEDIA: Location Topics

Finding Future X in Cape Town

Ebola: The 2014 Outbreak Explained

Meet BRCK, Internet access built for Africa

African Technology and the Future

Konza Technology City

The Rise of an African Tiger Economy

‪Hello Africa - Mobile Phone Culture in Africa‬

Cellphones to Africa

‪Cindy: The Promise of Africa’s Future‬

‪The Making of an African Activist‬

Taps and Toilets

Africa Futures Project

Occupy South Africa

Paul Collier on why sub-Saharan Africa is falling behind

Brazil and Sub-Saharan Africa: Partnering for Growth




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Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List









Location Topics




Child Witchcraft Accusations in Ivory Coast

by Leo Igwe

Ivory Coast is one of the countries in Africa where belief is witchcraft is widespread. A Gallup Poll found in 2010 that up to 95 percent of the populations believed in “sorciellerie” – the French word for witchcraft. This means that witchcraft is more or less a ‘national religion’. Almost everyone in the country thinks as a matter of fact, not fantasy that witchcraft is real in its conception and consequences, that people can harm others using mystical means.

Full Story...



“H+ Clinic” is 55% Funded - Transhumanitarian Project in western Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

“Transhumanitarians” are contributing hundreds of dollars via a GoFundMe campaign to establish a “H+ Clinic” in an isolated Ruwenzori mountain village of western Uganda.

Full Story...



Transhumanists Helping the Ugandan Mountain Community of Kyarumba

by R. Dennis Hansen

The small community of Kyarumba, Uganda, is located in the southern end of Rwenzori Mountains (aka Mountains of the Moon).  It straddles a wild river that is prone to flooding.  The community recently got electricity.

Full Story...



Media and Critical Reporting of Traditional Medicine Claims in Africa

by Leo Igwe

African traditional medicine is widely perceived as a form of voodoo medicine, as a survival of some stone age pre-modern illiterate formation that still functions and fulfills medical purposes for Africans. This is, at least, how many anthropologists have viewed the subject. They have argued that African traditional medicine is unlike ‘western medicine’, and then go on to establish how witchcraft and magic is embedded in this ‘unique’ medical practice. African medicine men and women are portrayed as witch doctors - as if the traditional-medical profession is about treating and curing witchcraft.

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Atheism in Zambia - skeptical, rational thought in a very superstitious country

by Leo Igwe

Like other countries in Africa, Zambia is a very religious nation and has the dubious of distinction of being officially declared a Christian nation by President Federick Chiluba in 1996. One need not look far to see where Chiluba got the political will to establish this Christian nation. Eighty seven percent of the population is Christian and only twelve percent profess other faiths. The number of non-believers is too low to measure. Apparently, Zambia is 100 percent religious and theistic.

Full Story...



Computer Training Center installed in Masaka, Uganda - technoprogress in Africa

by R. Dennis Hansen

In January (2015), my son-in-law and grandson installed a small computer-training facility in a LDS Chapel in Masaka, Uganda.  The LDS chapel was chosen for several reasons:

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Installing Swing Sets in the Gulu Area, Uganda

by R. Dennis Hansen

A few years ago, Gulu was the center of an ugly uprising that left northern Uganda in dire straights.  Since the defeat of the rebel group–the Lord’s Resistance Army–the area is in recovery, but is still poor.

Our objectives in being in the Gulu area were threefold:

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African Development: Is Kicking Out Christianity and Islam the Answer?

by Leo Igwe

I state right away that I do not think “Kicking Christianity and Islam out of Africa” is the Answer. Why do I believe this will not lead to development in Africa?

Full Story...



Albino Killings and Humanism in Malawi

by Leo Igwe

Four persons suspected of murdering an ‘albino’ have reportedly been arrested in Malawi. They allegedly abducted an ‘albino’ man from his village, killed him, removed his body parts and buried them in a riverbed. These horrific murders which have been taking place mainly in Tanzania seem to be spreading to this Southern African country, and it is important to rally Malawians against this horrendous practice before it is too late.

Full Story...



Ritual Killing and Skepticism in Zambia

by Leo Igwe

Zambia has just recorded its ‘first case’ of albino killing. Suspected ritualists butchered a 37 year old albino woman in the eastern district of Lundazi. They cut off her right hand and extracted the teeth from her mouth. In Zambia, ritual murder is on the rise.

Full Story...



Albino Killings, Witchcraft, And Political Elections In Tanzania

by Leo Igwe

If you are one of those who think there is no connection between politics and the savage practice of albino killing in Tanzania, then you need to read the recent statement from the Deputy Minister for Home Affairs, Pereira Silima. Silima made it clear to politicians in the country that if they stopped patronizing the ‘witch doctors’ then this East African country might see an end to the shameful and horrific murders of albinos.

The people in Tanzania need to discard the belief that drives them to attack kidnap and kill people living with albinism.

Full Story...



Pre-owned “American Girl Dolls” are Recycled to Support Girls Education in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

An innovative project that recycles the popular American Girl Dolls is raising funds to help Uganda girls stay in school.

“World Girl Dolls” is capitalizing on the immense popularity and resale value of American Girl Dolls. The project, organized by Zenobia Lloyd (11-years-old) works like this:

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What a Concept: Alleviating Poverty by Giving Money to the Poor

by Douglas Cruickshank

After I’d been living in rural Africa for a few months, I remarked to an American friend, “Based on careful analysis, I’ve discovered why people here are so poor: They don’t have any money.”

Poor people don’t have money. When they get money they become less poor. Sounds staggeringly obvious, but you’d be surprised how convoluted, dysfunctional and tangled up in bureaucracy that equation becomes once governments and the big foreign aid organizations—the Do-Gooder Industrial Complex—get involved.

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What Happened When Liberia Tested a Pilot Program of Cash Transfers to the Extreme Poor in Bomi?

by Scott Santens

Further evidence of the potential of basic income

I’m always on the lookout for more scientific evidence of what happens when people are provided cash incomes unconditionally. Recently I found something new, a pilot program tested in Bomi and Maryland Counties in Liberia that started in 2009 and ended in late 2014.

Implemented by the Liberian Ministry of Gender and Development with support from UNICEF and funded by the EU and Japan, it was called the “Social Cash Transfer Programme (SCT)” and was aimed at the “ultra-poor” - the poorest of the poor.

Full Story...



Three Transhumanist Organizations Fund “Science & Literacy Centre” in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

The Mormon Transhumanist Association (MTA) members of the Christian Transhumanist Association,  and Alcor Life Extension Foundation  have teamed up to establish a “Science & Literacy Centre” in Kyarumba, a small village in western Uganda. The project has attained 100% of its funding via generous individuals who donated money primarily at the GoFundMe campaign site.

Full Story...



From Children of ‘Witches’ to ‘Child Witches’ in Ghana

by Leo Igwe

Children are among those who populate the witch camps in the Northern Ghana. These children are not at the sanctuary because they were accused of witchcraft. They are at these shelters because their mothers or grand mothers were accused. But from my observations, many of these children end up suffering as a result the label of witchcraft applied to their mothers or grand mothers. The belief in child witches exist among the Dagomba and other ethnic communities in the Northern region. But it takes a different dimension.

Full Story...



BiZoHa (in Uganda): the World’s First Atheist Orphanage

by Hank Pellissier

Is every orphanage in the world operated by a religious organization?

Nope. Not any more.

BiZoHa Orphanage was launched by four members of the Brighter Brains Institute - a think-and-do tank located in San Francisco’s East Bay. BiZoHa is situated in Muhokya, in Kasese province, near the Rwenzori mountains of western Uganda, close to the Congo border.

BiZoHa is the world’s first atheist orphanage.

Full Story...



Understanding Witchcraft and Witch Sanctuaries in Northern Ghana

by Leo Igwe

Witch sanctuaries, described by local NGOs as ‘witch camps’, form part of the infrastructure of witchcraft in Northern Ghana. These sanctuaries are shrines, though one of sanctuaries in Gushiegu is not attached to any shrine. Tindana are the heads of the sanctuaries. The Dagbani term, Tindana, literally means - the one who owns the land. They are responsible for consulting the Tindang, the community spirit or god whenever there is a problem like drought or epidemic, war, plague, accusations of death or illness witchcraft, etc

Full Story...



Hank Pellissier returns to IEET as Fundraiser & Interim Managing Director

We are pleased to announce that IEET Affiliate Scholar Hank Pellissier is returning to the staff as IEET Interim Managing Director and Fundraiser. Hank was Managing Director from 2011-2012. The 2012-2015 Managing Director, Kris Notaro, who continued Hank’s work and helped recruit more than a hundred additional IEET writers, will begin directing the Rights of the Person Program, focusing on issues of consciousness and personhood.

Full Story...



‘Let’s Kick Islam & Christianity out of Africa’ - interview with Nigerian activist Jd Otit

by Hank Pellissier

I am interested in “secularizing” Africa because I believe this would benefit the continent intellectually, socially, and economically. To help advance this goal I support Kasese Humanist Primary School, and I co-launched BiZoHa - the world’s first atheist orphanage.

Full Story...



Africa Needs NO Religion, for Peace and Development

by Masereka Solomon

Education is important to every individual on this planet. In pre-colonial Uganda, education was mainly informal. Missionaries and colonialists introduced the formal education system, but the missionaries wanted Africans to believe in the message of Jesus.

Today, Jesus and Muhammed have almost equal shares in Africa.

As religion dies in the western countries, it is busy in Africa, along with poverty and human rights abuses.

Full Story...



A Fleet of Jets: A Critical Look at the Business of African Pentecostalism

by Leo Igwe

Anybody who thinks that the wave of christianity based witch hunting and pentecostalism sweeping across Africa and migrant communities is due to some unique strand of piety and religiosity of Africans should think again. The rise of African pentecostalism has a lot to do with the 'business acumen' of the region's 'pastorpreneurs' who are exploiting the situation in the region. 



Is the Ethiopian Village of Awra Amba Really a Utopia?

by R. Dennis Hansen

My Ethiopian guide had mentioned a possible visit to the village of Awra Amba.  I had never heard of the place, so I looked it up on the Internet.  When I learned that it was a “utopian” community in northern Ethiopia, I decided I to pay a visit.  I had previously traveled to a similar “utopian” enterprise–Gaviotas–in Colombia in 2010.



Nigerians will soon have to worry about implanted pacemaker security

by Utibe Effiong

When Reuters announced the successful deployment of the first Internet-enabled pacemaker in the United States, it was a dream come true for many. The news came late in the summer of 2009, three weeks after Carol Kasyjanski became the first American recipient of a wireless pacemaker that allowed her doctor to monitor her health from afar. Since then there has been a proliferation of Internet-connected personal medical devices, or iPMDs, which now include insulin pumps, glucometers, blood pressure cuffs, pulse oximeters, walking canes, and of course, the ubiquitous fitness wearables.



Top 10 Emerging Tech: an African Perspective. Genetic Engineering, Additive Manufacturing, AI

by Utibe Effiong

What do emerging technologies mean for a developing economy like Nigeria?  This is the second article in a series where I focus on the World Economic Forum’s list of the most promising emerging technologies for the year 2015. Here, I examine the implications of technological breakthroughs such as precise genetic engineering, additive manufacturing, and artificial intelligence, in developing economies such as Nigeria.



More Swing Sets for Africa

by R. Dennis Hansen

On a recent trip (Jan/Feb 2015) to Uganda and Ethiopia, we installed 3 new swing sets, finished a wooden one that partially completed, and made a few repairs to several existing swings.  I love installing swing sets around the world.  It’s fun overcoming the logistical problems, and it’s great to see the kids having a fun time swinging back and forth.



Fighting malaria is going to take more than just nets

by Utibe Effiong

In January, the New York Times highlighted how insecticide treated nets meant to protect people from mosquitoes and malaria are now being used to haul fish in Africa. Among those using these nets to catch fish, hunger today is a bigger risk than malaria tomorrow.



The Media was Right… Bad Luck Causes Most Cancers in Nigeria!

by Utibe Effiong

The recent study in the journal Science, which suggested that most cancers are due to bad luck rather than lifestyle or environmental factors, generated massive media ripples. To summarize, authors Tomasetti and Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins University say the “majority [of cancers] are due to “bad luck,” that is, random mutations arising during DNA replication in normal, noncancerous stem cells”.



Boko Haram and the Politics of Fighting Jihadists in Nigeria

by Leo Igwe

As world leaders gathered at the French capital to march in solidarity with France following a brutal attack on its citizens by terrorists, something far more atrocious and horrifying in scale and severity unfolded in north-east Nigeria. Boko Haram militants massacred over 2000 persons, mainly women, children and elderly people.



South Sudanese Refugees Flood into Northwestern Uganda

by R. Dennis Hansen

This year (2014) alone, it is estimated that over 150,000 South Sudanese refugees will flood south into northwestern Uganda (the area around Arua).  This is the result of the fierce tribal and ethnic warfare going on in South Sudan.  Analyses of arrival profiles show that women and children continue to represent the vast majority of the new arrivals.

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