Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Basic Income



MULTIMEDIA: Basic Income Topics

Changing Utopia - or what Guy Standing learned from the Lady of the Future

Robert Reich on Basic Income

What Is Universal Basic Income and Why Support It?

How To Make A Living When Robots Take Our Jobs

How To Make A Living When Robots Take Our Jobs

Why we should give everyone a basic income

Automate Now? Robots, Jobs and Universal Basic Income A Public Debate

Switzerland: Basic Income ‘Robot’ causes a commotion in Davos

One Happy Story - The Citizen’s Basic Income

Religious Transhumanism

Technological Unemployment and the Future

How About a MAXIMUM Wage?

Technological Unemployment and Basic Income

Creative Destruction

The Future of Work and Death (Trailer)




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Basic Income Topics




La lente évaporation du travail

by Cyril Gazengel

Entre fantasme et réalité

Depuis le début de l’ère industrielle, l’idée du remplacement de l’homme par la machine dans le milieu du travail a fait du chemin, au point de paraître crédible aujourd’hui. En effet, les percées en intelligence artificielle lèvent une inquiétude : et si l’humain devenait obsolète.



Technoprogressivism Under Trump

by J. Hughes

This is from an interview I gave yesterday to a French journalist. Thought you might be interested.

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Worst case scenario – 2035 and no basic income.

by Khannea Suntzu

There is now an almost constant stream of articles saying what was politically incorrect to state out loud just 5-8 years ago – Technological Unemployment is certain, it is imminent and ‘something like a basic income’ will be necessary. I have said so much on this societal issue in the last ten years that it quite often feels like an obligatory rehash of the arguments in favor of a basic income. The best and most authoritative arguments are still being voiced by Martin Ford and I suggest everyone to check his level-headed and well researched presentations on the topic. In my understanding Martin blows arguments against out of the water.



Guaranteed Mirage Income?

by Jonathan Kolber

Abstract:

According to Oxford, B of A Merrill Lynch, and other researchers, technological job displacement will increase dramatically in the next decade. Awareness of the threat this poses to societal stability is rapidly rising. Along with this awareness, there is increased discussion of guaranteed income (in various flavors) as a solution. This article explores the myriad challenges associated with permanently implementing any such program on a national basis.



Capitalism Mandates a Basic Income Guarantee

by Mark Walker

A Basic Income Guarantee (BIG) is a monthly stipend sufficient to provide the necessities of life. While there is disagreement even amongst friends of BIG as to how much is sufficient, we will work with a figure of $833 a month, $10,000 a year. BIG has been in the news in the last few years with a Swiss referendum on the matter and a pilot program in the works for Finland. Arguments from the left for BIG tend to appeal to social justice considerations. One line suggests that in a wealthy country like the U.S., no one should go hungry or be homeless, and BIG is an efficient means to ensure this minimal standard of care.



Your Jobs vs Your Dignity

by James Felton Keith

What we don’t know can hurt us. In the past year, it seems that 15 years of economic erosion has taken its toll on the wisdom of our 20th century experience. Nostalgic sentiments from an analogue age have seeped into the modern political discourse. Not because, they’ll work, but because people can understand them.

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Using P2P value maps and universal darwinism for a crypto basic income system

by Johan Nygren

Back in the early 2000s, Ryan Fugger invented something that will come to change the future of economics. He invented Ripple, a P2P credit clearing system. Some argue that P2P credit is unstable and prone to inflation, and I second that, and I believe Ripple should be combined with some form of stable index. Perhaps something like solarcoin.org — what could be more stable than the energy of a photon?



Youtube as Motivator - what people can do with their basic incomes

by Scott Santens

As I’ve blogged about previously, being a cord cutter I watch YouTube instead of TV, and it’s because of this I think I don’t see people in the same way many do, where there’s a mistaken belief people do nothing unless paid to do something. To the contrary, it’s clear on YouTube that people love doing all kinds of things when they have the ability to do them. Therefore, YouTube to me is a window into a post-basic income world full of intrinsic motivation, where video after video is made for the love of making and sharing videos with those who enjoy watching them.

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Basic Income Guarantee — my three hesitations

by Hank Pellissier

I support the generous intention of Basic Income Guarantee: the notion of “sharing the wealth”, rescuing people from impoverishment, granting a cushion to help people pursue their dreams.

I am on board with all that but I have three hesitations. Quibbles that trouble me…

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A Way to Pay for Global Citizen’s Income: Project Update and Report

by Margaret Morris

Concerning a way to pay for an Unconditional Basic Income that grows instead of fails or remains just enough to relieve severe poverty:

A Basic Income project was announced at Transhumanity.net on November 24, 2014.(1) The approach described involves a practical way of enlarging the space economy so as to create ongoing revenue for eliminating global poverty.

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The Disproportionate Effects of a Universal Basic Income

by Scott Santens

Can UBI function as reparations?

One very interesting but not so easy to understand element of universal basic income is how it disproportionately helps traditionally marginalized groups more than anyone else.

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Basic Income Guarantee will allow us to move up the Maslow Pyramid - interview with Gerd Leonhard

by Hank Pellissier

Gerd Leonhard is an acclaimed European futurist; his popular videos are featured at IEET and he is a regular IEET contributing writer. In this interview I explore his opinions and forecasts on Basic Income Guarantee.

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Basic Income is certain, but ‘they’ will wait as long as they can to implement it.

by Khannea Suntzu

Looking at the barrage of news on technological unemployment, we may get lucky and avoid the predictable denialism phase altogether. A lot of time gets wasted on denying things that are inescapable. We may get lucky, as in “we might avoid a massively disfunctional dystopian future full of mass-poverty and the consequences thereof“.

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The Goods of Work (other than Money) in a Postwork Future

by John Danaher
Let’s distinguish between two senses of the word ‘work’:

Work 1: The performance of some skill in return for, or in the ultimate hope of receiving, an extrinsic economic reward.

Work2: Activities performed by human beings, individually and in groups, for both intrinsic and extrinsic reasons, not necessarily for economic reward.

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Transhuman Debate in SF East Bay, co-sponsored by IEET

IEET is co-sponsoring a “Transhuman Debate” event in Oakland, California, on February 6, 2016, at Humanist Hall.

The debate will feature two “Oxford Style” Transhumanist Team Debates on these topics:

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“Inequality: What can be done? “ - interview with Sir Anthony Barnes Atkinson

by Hank Pellissier

Sir Anthony Barnes (“Tony”) Atkinson is a British economist who has worked on inequality and poverty issues for over four decades. He is a Fellow of the British Academy,  Fellow of the Econometric Society, Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was knighted in 2000. He academically mentored and has collaborated with Thomas Piketty (author of Capital in the Twenty-First Century) and his recent book Inequality: What can be done? was published in 2015.

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Basic Income’s Tragedy

by Khannea Suntzu

I am one of those people who “believe” (for lack of a better term) in the future. I am sure advancing technologies are mostly a good thing. Progress makes existence for humans better, and beyond that technological advances allow us to change undesirable aspects of the human state (and there are many) and engineer these in objectively better states of “transhumanism”.

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#3: Universal Basic Income - The Foundation of a Technically Advanced Society

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

According to IEET readers, what were the most stimulating stories of 2015? This month we’re answering that question by posting a countdown of the top 30 articles published this year on our blog (out of more than 1,000), based on how many total hits each one received.

The following piece was first published here on June 15, 2015,  and is the #3 most viewed of the year.

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The Case For Universal Prosperity (Part 4)

by Michael Hrenka

Currently, automation is often seen as very negative, because it eliminates jobs. When jobs become much less of a necessity, due to their income generating function being taken over by a SUPI, the negative sentiments against automation will decrease – and may even turn into demands for faster automation. Social and political resistance against automation will disappear. Therefore, the speed of innovation can increase, which should give the economy a big boost.



Technoprogressive Political Platform for the USA

by Ben Goertzel

This year we’ve seen a flurry of activity at the intersection of transhumanism and contemporary politics – the emergence of Transhumanist Parties in several different countries, and Zoltan Istvan’s controversial, mostly theatrical run for US President (see this article for a brief summary of some of the controversy). 

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The Case For Universal Prosperity (Part 3)

by Michael Hrenka

What is universal prosperity? My idea of universal prosperity is that we can lift the living standards of everyone to a really decent level within the next decades. This “prosperity” life standard would include the following:



Demanding a Post-Work World: Technological Unemployment and the Human Future

by John Danaher

The political left has long been oriented toward the future. This is clear in its revolutionary ethos: the utopia of the revolutionary is, after all, always just around the corner. But in orienting itself toward the future, the left has not always been actively futurist in its outlook. Many leftists are uncomfortable with technology and science, viewing them as insidious and malign capitalistic projects. As a result, their utopian dreams often end up looking to a mythic historical Golden Age for inspiration.

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The Case For Universal Prosperity (Part 2)

by Michael Hrenka

For the rest of this article I assume a model which I see as suboptimal – but realistic – conservative compromise:
Almost all social security policies get slashed in favour of a sufficient UBI.
Consumption taxes and income taxes are both increased so much that they can cover any additional cost that a sufficient UBI would impose.
Land value taxation and social dividends are not used to finance the UBI, even though that might be seen as preferred solution.



The Case For Universal Prosperity (Part 1)

by Michael Hrenka

In this article series I present two different versions of a universal basic income (UBI). The first two parts are about a moderate UBI that aims to cover basic living expenses. As short-term goal I propose experimentation with this moderate concept with the medium-term goal to implement it on the national level. It does not matter much which nation is meant exactly, because the logic of the UBI will be basically the same for all nations.



Les conséquences d’une automatisation totale

by Alexandre Maurer

Le robot que vous pouvez voir ci-contre se nomme Baxter. Développé par la start-up Rethink Robotics [1], il a pour ambition de remplacer les humains dans des tâches industrielles simples. Son atout ? La polyvalence. Les robots industriels classiques ne savent effectuer que quelques tâches ultra-spécialisées.

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Poverty as Precursor to Mental Illness

by Khannea Suntzu

In most of the western world we have a prevailing societal model of self-reliance and personal responsibility. It’s easy to see the limitations of this model – people get old and sick, most people have emotional or other vulnerabilities and significant periods in our life we are just unable to protect ourselves.

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Polanyi’s Paradox: Will Humans Maintain Any Advantage Over Machines?

by John Danaher

Previous Entry

There is no denying that improvements in technology allow machines to perform tasks that were once performed best by humans. This is at the heart of the technological displacement we see throughout the economy. The key question going forward is whether humans will maintain an advantage in any cognitive or physical activity. The answer to this question will determine whether the future of the economy is one in which humans continue to play a relevant part, or one in which humans are left behind.

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IEET Audience Divided on Minimum Wage and Technological Unemployment

We asked “Should we promote higher minimum wages even if they accelerate technological unemployment?” Of the 134 of you who responded to our poll, one in six were OK with promoting higher minimum wages because you are skeptical of technological unemployment, and one in four questioned promoting higher minimum wages because you are skeptical of the feasibility of achieving a basic income guarantee. A little more than half of you thought working for higher minimum wages was OK either because a basic income guarantee is inevitable, or because we can simultaneously promote higher minimum wages and a BIG.

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Technology and Human Dignity

by David Orban

The conversation around technological unemployment, which assumes that we will see increasing amounts of social tension due to automation replacing human work in all sectors, hides a more fundamental issue. Technology must be designed and deployed in order to support human dignity, the building of sustainably meaningful lives, and the creation of resilient communities.

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In Defense of Work

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

“When I retire from work, I will finally live the life I’ve always wanted.”

Employment. Earning a living. Our life’s work. Career. Vocation.

Retirement. Freedom. Doing what I really want. Finally free.

What’s the deal with our relationship to work? When I was young, I was told to get a good job, earn a living, then retire and live a life free of work. I would listen to the adults around me and wonder what it meant. As if the only work we do is for another in order to receive money. Where does this idea come from? For if it’s true, then the human being doesn’t do a lick of work before getting that good job, and then after sixty, doesn’t work again.

Full Story...

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