Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view


Posthuman and Transhuman Bodies in Religion and Spirituality Panel
October 28
Harvard University

Cyborg Law Symposium
November 7
Austin, Texas

Anticipation 2017 Conference
November 8-10
London, England

Robotic Online Short Film Festival
November 20
Universidad Elche, Spain

Hughes @ Transhumanist Culture Festival
November 27
Stockholm, Sweden

Hughes @ Singularity Salon
November 28
Stockholm, Sweden

Transpolitica 2016 Conference
December 3
London, England


Do Nootropics Give Esports Gamers an Edge?

The Man Biohacking Encryption From His Garage

This Mind-Controlled Bionic Arm Can Touch and Feel

Quantum Computing FW: Thinking

Bill Nye: 3D Printing is Awesome, but It’s Nothing Compared to What’s Coming

Have a Moral Dilemma? Start with Your Gut Reaction, but Don’t Stop There

NASA Was about to Eat Itself — Then Private Enterprise Stepped In

How we can start winning the war against cancer

What you need to know about CRISPR

Technology hasn’t changed love. Here’s why

How we’re harnessing nature’s hidden superpowers

The era of personal DNA testing is here

The Future of Pain!

Gene Drives: Saving Lives Or Powering Extinctions?

Do Death Differently!

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Life Topics

Brain Implant Allows Paralyzed Man to Feel Objects With a Prosthetic Limb

by George Dvorsky

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC have developed a system that’s enabling a man with quadriplegia to experience the sensation of touch through a robotic arm that he controls with his brain.

Brexit for Transhumanists: A Parable for Getting What You Wish For

by Steve Fuller

For the past two years, Zoltan Istvan has been campaigning for the US presidency on the Transhumanist Party, a largely one-man show which nevertheless remains faithful to the basic tenets of transhumanism. Now suppose he won. Top of his policy agenda had been to ensure the immortality of all Americans. But even Zoltan realized that this would entail quite big changes in how the state and society function. So, shortly after being elected president, he decides to hold a national referendum on the matter.

Why the Human Lifespan Ends at 122

by George Dvorsky

The oldest human to have ever lived died at the age of 122—and that was nearly 20 years ago. A recent analysis of global demographic data suggests this may very well be the maximum age attainable by humans, and that it’s extremely unlikely anyone will ever live much beyond this advanced age. That is, unless we science the shit out of this problem.

Interdire le transhumanisme ?

by Marc Roux

Le neuro-oncologue François Berger s’apprête, avec des confrères, à lancer un appel à un moratoire contre le transhumanisme. Ce serait, à notre connaissance, une première mondiale. Voici notre réaction.

Have you ever inspired the greatest villain in history? I did, apparently

by David Orban

In 2010 when I organized the H+ Summit conference at Harvard University, together with my friend Alex Lightman, I would not have imagined that it would be a key event in the history of Inferno. Instead it seems that, according to the protagonists of the book, the villain of the story got his ideas at the conference. On Saturday, October 15 I organized a special screening of the film Inferno, with SingularityU Milan, followed by a debate on the limits of technology and how to apply it in a positive direction for the development of humanity.

Is the internet killing democracy?

by Rick Searle

Standing as we are with our nose so tightly pressed against the glass, it’s impossible to know what exactly the current, crazy presidential election will mean, not just for American, democracy, but for the future of democracy itself. Of course, much of this depends on the actual outcome of the election, when the American public will either chose to cling to a system full of malware, corrupted and buggy, yet still functional, or risk everything on a hard reboot. This would include the risk that we might never be able to reset the clock to the time before we had plunged over the abyss and restore an order that while outdated, ill-designed, and running up against the limits of both still managed to do the job.

IEET Affiliate Scholar Melanie Swan Interviewed on Finance Disrupted

Melanie Swan, Philosophy and Economic Theorist, New School for Social Research

To read the full interview on Finance Disrupted click HERE

How do we Enhance Cognition through External Representations? Five Ways

by John Danaher

I use pen and paper to do most of my serious thinking. Whether it is outlining blogposts or academic papers, taking notes or constructing arguments, I pretty much always take out my trusty A4 pad and pen when I run into a cognitive trough. To be sure, I often mull ideas over in my head for a long time beforehand, but when I want to move beyond my muddled and incoherent thoughts, I will grab for my pen and paper. I am sure that many of you do the same. There is something cognitively different about thinking outside your head: creating an external representation of your thoughts reveals their strengths and weaknesses in a way that internal dialogue never can.

UK Futurologist’s ‘Novel’ Approach to Public Engagement!

“What makes something sentient?  What does it take for an entity to be aware of its own existence and to want to interact with the world of its own accord?  Is it a gift from God or hard science?  Is it something fundamentally human or animal in nature or is it a simple technological principle based on brain size?  There are many models, of course.  But, if consciousness is simply a natural product of neural complexity then eventually, in theory, we might build something – a computer or a machine – that was actually big enough to wake up!

Oh, wait …!”

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Le vieillissement est-il une maladie ?

by Alexandre Maurer

Qu’est-ce qui différencie le vieillissement d’une maladie, au fond ? Il en a toutes les caractéristiques ! Cette question un brin provocatrice est une invitation à nous interroger sur l’arbitraire de nos catégories.

Personal Security in the Age of Digital Assistants

by Maria Ramos

Fully-realized artificial intelligence has long been the holy grail for daydreamers and forward-thinking inventors alike. We aren’t quite there yet, but modern virtual assistants are making the case that we aren’t so very far off. Whether it’s a feature integrated into your smartphone or a standalone assistant like the Amazon Echo, digital assistants have shown great strides in the ability to recognize and parse your spoken commands and respond to them appropriately.

New Wind Turbines Could Power Japan for 50 Years After a Single Typhoon

by George Dvorsky

Typhoons are generally associated with mass destruction, but a Japanese engineer has developed a wind turbine that can harness the tremendous power of these storms and turn it into useful energy. If he’s right, a single typhoon could power Japan for 50 years.

FDA Approves World’s First Automated Insulin Pump for Diabetics

by George Dvorsky

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G, a medical device that monitors a diabetic’s sugar levels, and then automatically injects the required dose of insulin.

An A.I. Epiphany?

by Jonathan Kolber

In movies such as The Terminator, The Matrix and so forth, self-aware AIs come into existence and soon threaten humanity. This thinking is reflected in the arguments by Musk, Hawking and others against creating strong AIs.

Our Last Line of Defense Against Gonorrhea Is Failing

by George Dvorsky

Health officials in the US have identified a cluster of gonorrhea infections that exhibited unusual resistance against the last two main antibiotics known to work against the dreaded sexually transmitted disease.

Monsanto Just Got Access to the World’s Most Powerful Gene-Editing Tool

by George Dvorsky

Agriculture company Monsanto has acquired a non-exclusive global licensing agreement from MIT’s Broad Institute and Harvard to use the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system. The firm will use it to design and grow new seeds and plants, but there are key restrictions on its use to prevent Monsanto from abusing this revolutionary new technology.

Pushing Humans off the Loop: Automation and the Unsustainability Problem

by John Danaher

There is a famous story about an encounter between Henry Ford II (CEO of Ford Motors) and Walter Reuther (head of the United Automobile Workers Union). Ford was showing Reuther around his factory, proudly displaying all the new automating technologies he had introduced to replace human workers. Ford gloated, asking Reuther ‘How are you going to get those robots to pay union dues?’. Reuther responded with equal glee ‘Henry, how are you going to get them to buy your cars?’.

How to Make Intelligent Robots That Understand the World

There are some amazing robots roving the surface of Mars. However, they are heavily dependent on their human operators. But what if we could provide them with human-like intelligence so that they could find their own way without assistance? What if we could teach them to autonomously deal with completely novel situations? IEET Contributor Danko Nikolic on the 28th of September will answer your questions.

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Link to Guaana

Here’s Why The IoT Is Already Bigger Than You Realize

by Charles Bell

Sometimes it feels like the Internet of Things (or IoT) is a little bit overblown. Maddening commercials like this one try to make it seem like a spiritual revolution for humankind, and you may have seen our thoughts on the emergence of the term “smart” to define objects. Furthermore, the main IoT applications that people actually seem to care about at this point are pretty much FitBits and Nest thermostats-fun Christmas presents, but not exactly groundbreaking technological concepts.

Competitive Cognitive Artifacts and the Demise of Humanity: A Philosophical Analysis

by John Danaher

David Krakauer seems like an interesting guy. He is the president of the Santa Fe institute in New Mexico, a complexity scientist and evolutionary theorist, with a noticeable interest in artificial intelligence and technology. I first encountered his work — as many recently did — via Sam Harris’s podcast. In the podcast he articulated some concerns he has about the development of artificial intelligence, concerns which he also set out in a recent (and short) article for the online magazine Nautilus.

Call for Papers The Second International Conference on Anticipation

The 2nd International Conference on Anticipation provides an interdisciplinary meeting ground in which researchers, scholars and practitioners who are seeking to understand anticipation and anticipatory practices can come together to deepen their understanding and create productive new connections.

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Critical Nature of Emotions in Artificial General Intelligence

by David J. Kelley

This paper reviews the key factors driving the Independent Core Observer Model Cognitive Architecture for Artificial General Intelligence specific to modeling emotions used to drive motivational and decision making processes in humans; as it relates to or inspires the ICOM motivational systems.  Emotions in ICOM are key elements of the ability to be self-motivating and make decisions.  Behavioral tuning research case work around motivations in ICOM, as seen in the series 4 ICOM Isolation Studies designed to validate the series 4 model versus series 3 model and used to bench mark as well as tune the ICOM emotional processing core, are presented.  Detailed is the reasoning for emotions in ICOM as used as a method of tagging ideas, concepts, and experiences for evaluation. Such emotions are the driving force behind the ICOM system’s subjective experiences.

Will human enhancement cause problems for interpersonal communication?

by John Danaher

China Mieville’s novel Embassytown is a challenging and provocative work of science fiction. It is set in Embassytown, a colonial outpost of the human-run Bremen empire, located on Arieka, a planet on the edge of the known universe. The native alien race are known as the Ariekei and they have an unusual language. They have two speaking orifices and as a result speak two words at the same time.

Computers and Law Special Edition on Algorithmic Governance

by John Danaher

As part of the Algocracy and Transhumanism project I am running, myself and my colleague Dr. Rónán Kennedy put together a special edition of the journal/magazine Computers and Law on the topic of algorithmic governance. It consists of a diverse range of articles on the increasingly prominent role of algorithms in decision-making, and the implications this has for the law. The special edition arose from a workshop we held on the topic back in March 2016.

A Free Education for all the World’s People: Why is this Not yet a Thing?

by Eliott Edge

When we as a global community confront the truly difficult question of considering what is really worth devoting our limited time and resources to in an era marked by such global catastrophe, I always find my mind returning to what the Internet hasn’t really been used for yet—and what was rumored from its inception that it should ultimately provide—an utterly and entirely free education for all the world’s people.

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Alcor Life Extension Foundation sponsors health clinic in Nyakiyumbu, Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

The Alcor Life Extension Foundation, the “world leader in cryonics, cryonics research, and cryonics technology”, is sponsoring a health clinic for orphans in the impoverished village of Nyakiyumbu, Uganda.

Defining the Blockchain Economy: What is Decentralized Finance?

by Melanie Swan

The aim of this article is to explore the intersection of blockchain technology and finance from a practical, theoretical, and conceptual standpoint.

Mylan’s New Generic EpiPen is Still Too Goddamned Expensive

by George Dvorsky

Pharmaceutical company Mylan has announced plans to launch its first generic EpiPen. But at a cost of $300—which is half of the branded product’s list price—it’s still a heap of money for this critically important medicine.

Transhumanisme et quête de sens

by Alexandre Maurer

Le transhumanisme peut être un moyen de donner plus de sens à l’humanité. Essayons d’expliquer pourquoi.

Calling All Parents: Don’t Let Calculus I Be the End!!!!

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

In a recent article published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), author Maggie Kuo wrote,

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