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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Biosecurity

Baum, Pellissier @ Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures
June 14
Piedmont, CA USA




MULTIMEDIA: Biosecurity Topics

How Positive Psychology/Thinking is Concealing some of the Real Causes of our Collective Suffering

The Next Captain America is YOU

Designing Compassionate Ecosystems and Genetically Engineering the Ending of Suffering

Genetic Modification Outside The Food Context

Scary, Thought-provoking, Futurist Prank by Singularity 1 on 1

If Nature Had Been Kinder

Stem Cells are the Future

The time has come to set a higher goal!

How to break the Internet, destroy democracy and enslave the human race (or not)

Better than Borg in an Age of Enhancement

Desalination - Tech Between A Rock And A Hard Place

This BISICLES simulation shows the collapse of Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier

What’s next—the horizon of our dreams

Greens call for clear-out of ‘climate change deniers’

The Antispeciesist Revolution




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Biosecurity Topics




Will sex workers be replaced by robots? (A Precis)

by John Danaher

I recently published an article in the Journal of Evolution and Technology on the topic of sex work and technological unemployment (available here, here and here). It began by asking whether sex work, specifically prostitution (as opposed to other forms of labour that could be classified as “sex work”, e.g. pornstar or erotic dancer), was vulnerable to technological unemployment. It looked at contrasting responses to that question, and also included some reflections on technological unemployment and the basic income guarantee.



Social Futurist revolution & the Zero State

by Amon Twyman

We have recently seen increased interest in the issues of workplace automation,technological unemployment, and Basic Income Guarantee (AKA Universal Basic Income). Some observers have been perplexed by visceral and sharply divided public opinion, with people viewing these phenomena as inherently positive or negative.



Veridical Engagement and Radical Enhancement

by John Danaher

This is the second post in my series on Nicholas Agar's new book Truly Human Enhancement. The book offers an interesting take on the enhancement debate. It tries to carve out a middle ground between bioconservatism and transhumanism, arguing that modest enhancement (within or slightly beyond the range of human norms) is prudentially valuable, but that radical enhancement (well beyond the range of human norms) may not be.



Geeking Out on the Science of Risk

by Andrew Maynard

Danger and death are part and parcel of being alive. But with a few notable exceptions, it’s hard to find straightforward information online on how to make sense of stuff that potentially threaten our health and wellbeing. Which is a pity, because as well as being important for making smart decisions, there’s some really cool science behind how what we touch, breathe, eat, or otherwise come into contact with affects our health.



Soil as an Organism

by Brenda Cooper

I live in Washington State, and all the news for the last two weeks has been the unthinkable Oso mudslide.  Slides are not unusual here, although I have never heard of one with this much destructive force.  It got me reflecting about the relationship between earth and water.



Quest for immortality spurs breakthroughs in human-machine merge

by Dick Pelletier

By mid-century or before, many future followers predict the pace of technological progress in genetics, nanotechnology and artificial intelligence will become so fast that humans will undergo radical evolution. By the 2030s, we'll be deluged with medical breakthroughs that promise a forever youthful state of being.



Beyond Homophobia: The Even Bigger Reason to Avoid World Vision

by Valerie Tarico

In a media frenzy akin to the Komen scandal, Evangelical aid organization World Vision announced recently that it would allow legally married and monogamous queer Christians on its payroll. Conservative co-religionists, including Franklin Graham of Billy Graham Ministries, and Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Convention took to the media denouncing the decision as a violation of biblical Christianity and all that is good. 



Spreading the Word That Death is Wrong

by Gennady Stolyarov II

Who could have thought a month ago that an illustrated children’s book on indefinite life extension would become a fiercely, passionately discussed phenomenon not just in transhumanist and futurist circles, but on mainstream publications and forums? And yet that is exactly what has happened to Death is Wrong – certainly the most influential and provocative of all of my endeavors to date



The Massive Danger of Societal Nihilism

by Khannea Suntzu

Just a short while, a researcher by the name of Safa Motesharri came out with an article that got some support from NASA. NASA at least put some money in that study, and it caught on in the media that the story was an officially NASA sanctioned, supported or otherwise prominent study. It isn't but that does not make the conclusions in the study any more relevant.



Bioethicist Arthur Caplan receives 2014 Public Service Award for an individual

Caplan’s work fosters greater understanding of science, medicine and ethics. On March 24, 2014 the National Science Board (NSB) announced that renowned bioethicist and IEET Trustee Arthur Caplan, a global leader in medical ethics, is the 2014 recipient of its Public Service Award for an individual.

Full Story...
Link to National Science Foundation



The Element of Air

by Brenda Cooper

Every year, we science fiction fans are given the opportunity to vote on a host city for a future World Science Fiction convention.  This year, the vote will be between Kansas City and Shanghai.  I’m certain that I’ll be voting for Kansas City.  I’d LOVE to see the Great Wall, but I’ve seen pictures of the air in China lately, and my instincts suggest I may not want to take the health risks associated with a visit.  I’ve read that some of China’s elite are leaving for health reasons.



Waiting for World War III

by Rick Searle

Everyone alive today owes their life to a man most of us have never heard of, and that I didn’t even know existed until last week. On September, 26 1983, just past mid-night, Soviet lieutenant colonel Stanislav Petrov was alerted by his satellite early warning system that an attack from an American ICBM was underway. Normal protocol should have resulted in Petrov giving the order to fire Russian missiles at the US in response.



Anti-Technology Terrorism: An Upcoming Global Threat?

by Glyn Taylor

We are only just starting to discover what our upcoming technologies will be capable of, and already, through fear of possible future threats, bombs are being sent to physicists. Emerging technologies are set to revolutionise our world during the next few decades; could this lead to the rise of anti-technology terrorism becoming even more of a threat than radical [religion]?



The ethics of global catastrophic risk from dual-use bioengineering

by Seth Baum

A discussion of ethical and legal issues arising from bioengineered technologies that could benefit humanity or pose risk of a global catastrophe.



Scientists Create Genetically Modified Cells That Protect Against HIV

by George Dvorsky

The treatment is considered radical, and the results were drawn from a small scale human trial, but for the first time in medical history, researchers have boosted their patients’ ability to fight HIV by replacing some of their natural immune cells with genetically modified versions.



Are We Obligated to Make Ourselves More Moral and Intelligent? (Part One)

by J. Hughes

Most of the ethical discussion of the use of stimulant drugs without a prescription in education has been negative, associating their use with performance enhancement in sports and with drug abuse. But the use of stimulants as study drugs actually has few side effects, and is almost entirely applied to the student’s primary obligation, academic performance. In this essay I consider some objections to off-label stimulant use, and to stimulant therapy for ADD, and argue that there are ethical arguments for the use of stimulants, and for future cognitively and morally enhancing therapies, in education, the work place, and daily life.



Carbon Prices Drive Clean Energy Innovation

by Ramez Naam

I want to point out something I see commonly missed.  Carbon prices accelerate innovation that brings down the price of green energy. So do renewable energy portfolio standards, green energy subsidies, and a whole swath of other climate policies. They do this by increasing the scale of the industry, which drives more scale (a price reducer) and also brings more players, more investment (much of which goes to direct R&D) and more price competition between players (the single best driver of reduced prices there has ever been).



How To Survive The Pre-Singularity Era: Part II: Time Is Muscle

by Christine Gaspar

It can be said that practitioners of emergency medicine have their own unique language. As a member of this subset of healthcare, I can unequivocally agree that we have invented pseudonyms, algorithms, protocols, expressions and even our unique brand of humour to give expression to what we do every day. Codes come in various colours- blue, black, white, yellow, orange… in order to succinctly convey an emergency in a manner that is efficient, and somewhat covert from the unsuspecting public.



A Fundamental Challenge

by Brenda Cooper

There are colossal challenges that have no specific home but affect every place.  Air is one of them, and frankly most of climate change comes down to managing the air badly. What do we need second only to air? What lives everywhere and takes multiple forms?



Are there problems with the metaphor of mind-uploading?

by John Danaher

The dream of one day being able to upload your mind to a computer or other artificial device is shared by many transhumanists. Central to the dream is something we can call the “transference thesis”



Thermonuclear Monarchy and Revolution

by David Swanson

So now we (or at least the 0.03% of us who care to hunt for it) discover that U.S. military spending is not actually being cut at all, but increasing. Also going up: U.S. nuclear weapons spending.  Some of the new nukes will violate treaties, but the entire program violates the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which requires disarmament, not increased armament. 



Three-Parent Babies Are an Ethical Choice

by Arthur Caplan

The FDA is considering approving an experiment to repair a genetic disease in humans by creating embryos with DNA from three parents. Genes would be transferred from a healthy human egg to one that has a disease and the “repaired” egg then fertilized in the hope that a healthy baby will result. The goal of the experiment in genetic engineering is not a perfect baby but a healthy baby.



What’s Limiting the Impact of GMOs on Global Food Security?

by Ramez Naam

My friend Jon Foley, who I have a great deal of respect for, has a piece up arguing that GMOs have failed to improve global food security because they fall into a trap of reductionist thinking. With due respect to Jon, I see this a different way.



How can we Prevent Transhumans’ Violent Behavior Toward Humans?

by Ted Chu

The science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov famously proposed three laws for all robots to follow: (1) a robot may not attack a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm; (2) a robot must obey the orders given to it by a human being except where such orders would conflict with the first rule; (3) a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the first two rules. These “laws,” though they sound just and logical, are utterly impossible to implement if the autonomous robots are to be intelligent and able to reprogram themselves.



Earth 2314: Humanity scatters its populations to the stars

by Dick Pelletier

After rising from the primordial soup 3.5 billion years ago, Earth life began an evolutionary trip that has produced today’s amazing human. Futurists now ponder what’s next. Stephen Hawking, Michio Kaku, Thomas Frey, Ray Kurzweil, and other forward-thinkers believe technologies will advance exponentially in the centuries ahead, creating sweeping changes in how we view life, our planet, and the cosmos.



Cosmic Beings: Transhumanist Deism in Ted Chu’s Cosmic View

by Giulio Prisco

In Human Purpose and Transhuman Potential: A Cosmic Vision for Our Future Evolution, IEET affiliate scholar Ted Chu, a professor of Economics at New York University in Abu Dhabi and former chief economist for General Motors and the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, argues that post-humanity is a logical and necessary evolutionary next step for humanity, and we need a new, heroic cosmic faith for the post-human era. “The ultimate meaning of our lives rests not in our personal happiness but in our contribution to cosmic evolution,” says Chu…



Senior U.S. spies warn of future top 10 security threats

by George Dvorsky

A senior American spy chief has released his assessment of the most troubling threats facing the US — a list that includes terrorism, hackers, WMD proliferation, pandemics, extreme weather events — and the militarization of space.



The End of Nation States May Enhance Humanity

by Harry J. Bentham

Perhaps parallel to the physical enhancement of human ability and longevity through technology, enhancements to civilization must also have cultural and political forms. By far the most important of these could be the neglect and final dissolution of borders and “nations”.



Defeating aging, and the avenues ahead of us: Part 3

by Eric Schulke

There is a nice, succinct “Roadmap to Immortality” (http://mariakonovalenko.files.wordpress.com

/2013/01/roadmap_immortality_eng.pdf
) that is great for visualizing the big picture of the pathways that could take us to indefinite life extension. Teachers like mine have been telling students that there is probably no way forward to defeating aging. I like to think of this roadmap as the totality of the response that rose to meet that challenge.



Snowden Docs: U.S. Spied on Negotiators At 2009 Climate Summit

by Ryan Grim

The National Security Agency monitored the communications of other governments ahead of and during the 2009 United Nations climate negotiations in Copenhagen, Denmark, according to the latest document from whistleblower Edward Snowden. The document, with portions marked "top secret," indicates that the NSA was monitoring the communications of other countries ahead of the conference, and intended to continue doing so throughout the meeting.

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