Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view


Brin on “Beyond Curing Disease”
October 25-29
Indian Wells, CA USA

Brin on “Human Augmentation” @ Innovation Outreach Program
October 26
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Sorgner@7th LUMEN international conference
November 12-14
Targoviste, Romania

Sorgner @ Transhumanism: Perspektiven, Chancen, Risiken
December 5
Nürnberg, Germany

MULTIMEDIA: Enablement Topics

Alzheimer’s is Not Normal Aging and We Can Cure It

Ethical Implications of Anti-Aging Medicine

Could We Live Forever?

Mindful Meditation Makes Us Better Thinkers

Gene Therapy is NOT a Monstrous Science / Singularity 1on1

Digital Stroke

Technology Made Us Human

10 Amazing Robots That Will Change the World

First Video Camera to Use Artificial Intelligence to Identify and Self-Edit

Artificial Intelligence for the Blind

Fashion industry’s First Transgender Modeling Agency

Moral Enhancement: Do Means Matter Morally?

3-D Printing Guns, Drugs, and DNA Weapons: Organized Crime Is Being Decentralized

Reason, Emotion and Morality: Some Cautions for the Enhancement Project

The dilemma of human enhancement

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Enablement Topics

Transhumanists Donate Incubators to Afghanistan to Combat Infant Mortality

by Micah Redding

Earlier this year, the Christian Transhumanist Association made its public debut with an open invitation to membership, and a small fundraising campaign that brought in approximately $1200. Now, as our first substantial financial act, the membership advisory council, the donors, and the board have decided to contribute that money towards a project that combines technology, compassion, and respect for human life.

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Mindfulness-Based Therapy – Does it Work? (Summary, Part 3)

by Gareth John

Which brings me to my critique of mindfulness as therapy:

1.  Firstly, mindfulness is not and should not be viewed as the latest cure-all for those with mental health issues. It is not a panacea. By the time the Buddha started employing it within his teachings it had already had a long history of incremental development within a broader spiritual tradition and this continued up until the end of the last century. Within this tradition it is viewed as a powerful tool designed to do to the brain what the brain specifically does not want to do, i.e. remain uninvolved with thought patterns and feelings as they pass before the practitioner.

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Mindfulness-Based Therapy – Examining the Studies (Part 2)

by Gareth John

So is there any hard evidence that mindfulness-based therapies work? Well, the clinical evidence for mindfulness as a way to prevent depression, stress and anxiety appears at first glance to be sound. A review of the eight-week course was published in 2011 in Clinical Psychology Review by Jacob Piet and Esben Hougaard of Aarhus University, Denmark.

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What’s on your Mind? - Mindfulness-Based Therapies and Mental Health (Part 1)

by Gareth John

Before I begin, full disclosure and some caveats:

* In my youth I trained for thirteen years as a Buddhist priest, first with the Japanese Zen tradition and then within the Tibetan tantric tradition. As such, mindfulness based meditation formed the basis of my practice, even when, later in my training, other methods began to be employed.

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Digital Immortality Map: Reconstruction of the Personality Based on its Information Traces

by Alexey Turchin

If someone has died it doesn’t mean that you should stop trying to return him to life. There is one clear thing that you should do (after cryonics): collect as much information about the person as possible, as well as store his DNA sample, and hope that future AI will return him to life based on this information.


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The Natural Evolution of Prosthetic Technology

by Steven Umbrello

With the next installment of the hit video game franchise Deus Ex releasing in early 2016, I believe it is an opportune time to talk about prosthetics and the ethics of cosmetic and functional augmentation. To understand the future of prosthetics - if they call that in the future – we must first look at the history of prostheses to better grasp their evolution.

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Seven Emerging Technologies That Will Change the World Forever

by Gray Scott

When someone asks me what I do, and I tell them that I’m a futurist, the first thing they ask “what is a futurist?” The short answer that I give is “I use current scientific research in emerging technologies to imagine how we will live in the future.”

However, as you can imagine the art of futurology and foresight is much more complex. I spend my days thinking, speaking and writing about the future, and emerging technologies. On any given day I might be in Warsaw speaking at an Innovation Conference, in London speaking at a Global Leadership Summit, or being interviewed by the Discovery Channel. Whatever the situation, I have one singular mission. I want you to think about the future.

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Why Brave New World Is No Longer the Terrifying Dystopia it Used to Be

by George Dvorsky

Brave New World used to be one of the most terrifying stories about a false utopia. It gave us the concept of “test tube babies,” and its name became synonymous with technological progress run wild. But many of the things Aldous Huxley predicted are coming true, and it turns out they’re not so scary.

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Cryonics and Kim Suozzi

by John G. Messerly

A recent New York Times article chronicled 23-year-old Kim Suozzi’s decision to cryonically preserve her brain. Kim, who died recently of cancer, raised the money for her cryonic preservation by soliciting donations with this post at the subreddit “atheism” at the online site reddit—yes atheists can be generous people. Here is the video that accompanied the post:

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Victims of Our Age

by Franco Cortese

Aging is truly the travesty of our age. It constitutes the largest source of in-principle-preventable death in existence today – a toll of 100,000 real, feeling, hoping and daring human beings lost irreversibly for all time, per day. That’s a million human lives lost every one and a half weeks. A loss equal to the entire population of Canada every year, and to the entire U.S. population every decade. It accounts for three quarters of all deaths globally and for nine-tenths of all deaths in most developed countries. 

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The Electronic Frontier of Longevity and Control

by Brian Hanley

I have been pursuing gene therapies for aging, so my decision to discuss this goes against my current direction. We really don’t know what the limits are of what we might be able to do by playing the autonomic nervous system, but here are some thoughts to chew on.

The human brain is large, but 90% of your nervous system is outside your head. Researchers have found that interrupting vagus nerve signals to the brain can treat rheumatoid arthritis, as well as septic shock symptoms, however, some body subsystems may,  or may not be responsive to this manipulation. We know that nerves signaling the spleen is critical for interruption of sepsis.

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The Culturally Purposeful Robot

by Daniel Faggella

Earth is a colorful and diversely populated planet. Evolution just happened to be a genius beyond reckoning, but one that many of us take for granted much of the time - perhaps not on a conscious level, but in more of a conditioned and familiar sense. Continents of Homo sapiens developed into different races, created various cultures based on environment (and most likely genes), and the rest is history. Using this as a lens through which to frame humans’ development of robots, is there any reason to doubt that we will one day have any less of a diverse population of robots?

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Digital, Physical, and Religious Immortality - is there Common Ground?

by Agbolade Omowole

I grew up with the mindset to make a difference because life is short. It is said that life is not a measure of your duration on earth, but a measure of your donation to humanity. I have stopped believing that.

There are two ways to live one’s life: by default or by design.  By default, humans grow and become very energetic between ages 18 to 40, after that his/her strength begin to fade. At old age, s/he becomes weak and age related disease make him/her die. His average healthspan is 80 years (in developed countries) and nothing can be done to live beyond a century. That’s the status quo.

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“My Life With Bipolar Disorder: Non-Pharma Treatments” - interview with Gareth John (Part 2)

by Hank Pellissier

Gareth John is an IEET reader and supporter who lives in Mid Wales; he’s an ex-Buddhist priest with a MA in Buddhist Studies at the University of Bristol, and a PhD focusing on non-monastic traditions of Tibetan tantric Buddhism. He has Bipolar disorder. In this Q & A, he generously shares his experience.  This is Part 2 of two parts.

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Death - The Cunning Frontier

by Brian Hanley

We evolved to die. Our thymus involutes (withers away) in large part due to down-regulation of FoxN1. Once the thymus goes, it’s just a matter of time. Critical mitochondrial genes, GCAT & SHMT2, are turned off, and that causes oxidation damage that we interpreted as the cause of mitochondrial aging when it’s really the outcome. Upregulation ofATF4 expression results in muscle loss in aging. This list will lengthen the more we learn. Aging and death is no accident. It’s got value.

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Sexual Assault, Consent Apps and Technological Solutionism

by John Danaher

Sexual assault and rape are significant social problems. According to some sources, one in five American women will be victims of sexual assault or rape at some point during their university education. Though this stat is somewhat controversial  (see here for a good overview) similar (sometimes higher) figures are reported in other countries. For example, in Ireland one estimate is that 31% of women experience some form of ‘contact abuse’ in their lifetime. The figure for men is lower, but higher than you might suppose, with abuse more likely to occur during childhood.

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‘Spiritual/Philosophical’ is the Deepest, Highest, Most Powerful Dimension of Euphoria

by Andrés Gómez Emilsson

I have been mapping out the major axis of the states of consciousness accessible by humans via the use of psychotropic drugs.

My procedure is: I asked people from all sorts of drug forums online, as well as people in the general population, to answer a survey in which they are required to rate the effects of a drug they have taken (rating them on 30+ attributes such as “cheerful”, “calming” and “mystical”). You can read the methodology and the details of the analysis in here.

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The Ethics of Chemical Brain Preservation as a Life Saving Medical Procedure

by Michael Cerullo

Life Extension

Throughout most of human history there was little serious reason to debate the ethics of life extension. To quote Hobbes, most lives were “Nasty, brutish, and short.” Yet the lack of success didn’t stop hopes for miraculous life extension and such hopes have been pursued throughout recorded history [1]. While some hope that continued biomedical advances may cure aging [2,3] the focus of this paper will be on the more revolutionary technology of chemical brain preservation. The first part of the paper will examine the technology itself. Then we will examine arguments as to whether it is ethical for individuals to choose chemical brain preservation as a medical procedure and also whether it is ethical to expend resources now to pursue research into advancing the technology of brain preservation.

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Transhumanism’s Big Political Blind Spot

by Steve Fuller

For those who still don’t know what it is, transhumanism is basically the application of science and technology to amplify the human condition, potentially well beyond our biological default settings. As someone who has increasingly identified with transhumanism since publishing Humanity 2.0in 2011, I welcome the ideology’s move into the mainstream of politics and culture, at least in the English-speaking world. But the form it has taken is rather curious.

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The Future of Real: Meaning and Social Intelligence in a Transhuman Age

by Dorothy Deasy

I remember seeing the children falling through the air, their limbs akimbo, grasping for land or any anchor that would save them from the fall. I remember the feelings of terror, panic, pity and helplessness as I watched, unable to intervene. And then I awoke – alone, scared and slowly came to the realization that it was simply a dream, though still I feared closing my eyes again too soon lest I return. That dream took place more than 30 years ago. Much of the detail has faded – how did they come to fall? Were they pushed or did they jump like lemmings? – still I remember the images, can recall the emotions. It was just a dream; it wasn’t real. But I recall the experience of the dream. The personal semiotics that the dream contained were real, telling me something about my own psyche, my own sense of self and so making it an experience with meaning.

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Mindplexing - Cooperative, Shared, Distributed Collaboration between Networked Minds

by Jønathan Lyons

In December 2012, I wrote an IEET essay about humankind as a networked species.  This is undoubtedly true, as even casual observation would reveal.

The notion of a mindplex, or mindplexes, seems to be something toward which we are evolving, and I have had the good fortune to experience this phenomenon twice, recently.

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Is a Human Borg-Mind Inevitable?

by Ben Goertzel

Is a human borg-mind inevitable?   The answer, I think, is kinda …

A “borg” mind, as popularized by the classic Star Trek episode, is a group of people all controlled by a single collective will, consciousness and memory.  It’s obviously an extreme invented for entertainment purposes.   A more common term is “hive mind”, but there are many kinds of hive minds, of which the Borg Collective in Star Trek is a particular variety.

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Sleep Drug Modafinil Affirmed by Scientists as a Safe and Effective Brain Booster

by George Dvorsky

Off-license users of modafinil—a drug developed to treat various sleep disorders—have known for some time that it doubles as a surprisingly effective cognitive enhancer, and with very few side effects. A new systematic review shows it’s true, raising some important ethical questions about the use of smart drugs.
Modafinil, which is sold under such brand names as Alertec, Provigil, and Modavigil, is a wakefulness-promoting drug used to treat conditions such narcolepsy, the effects of shift work, sleep apnea, and other sleep disorders. But it’s also used off-license by people—especially students—hoping to exploit its nootropic qualities.

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Humans: The Next Platform

by Geoffrey Woo

Biohacking and transhumanist advances (including nootropics, extended longevity, cybernetic implants, better behavioral and genetic self-understanding) will materially advance our quality of life and productivity in the coming decade, but we need to be thoughtful about the potential social and ethical pitfalls as we transform. Google Trends shows a marked uptick in searches for “nootropics” and related biohacking fields, so now is the time to have the conversation about the direction we’re headed.

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The Political Voice of a Transhumanist - An Interview with Presidential Candidate Zoltan Istvan

by Daniel Faggella

About a year from today, Americans will line up at the polls to vote for the 45th President of the United States.  Whether Zoltan Istvan will represent the Transhumanist Party on that ballot remains to be seen, but it seems likely that he’ll be the first Transhumanist candidate to run for office.

Fringe political parties are not new, though ‘Transhumanist’ does have a novel ring to it. In a recent TechEmergence interview, I asked Zoltan, why is this the time, the 2016 election, for the Transhumanist party to make an entrance?

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Genome Stability Leads to Negligible Senescence

by Maria Konovalenko

What would you say if I told you that aging happens not because of accumulation of stresses, but rather because of the intrinsic properties of the gene network of the organism? I’m guessing you’d be like: o_0.

So, here’s the deal. My biohacker friends led by Peter Fedichev  and Sergey Filonov in collaboration with my old friend and the longevity record holder Robert Shmookler Reis published a very cool paper.

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Nicotine’s Cognitive Benefits – Six Ways to Ingest It

by Steven Umbrello

In 1560 the French ambassador in Portugal, Jean Nicot de Villemain, sent newly discovered seeds to the French king. These seeds would grow a plant that we today know as tobacco, or more properly Nicotiana Tabacum (named after the ambassador).

Although it would take a while for the hobby of smoking tobacco to catch on in the old world, it was already a popular practice amongst the native inhabitants in the western hemisphere.

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Practopoiesis - a Theory on How Life Organizes, including the Mind

by Danko Nikolic


A thought results primarily from an adjustment of the brain hardware, and not from a computation executed by that hardware.

(Download open-access manuscript at Journal of Theoretical Biology.)

The reason you should be interested in practopoiesis if you are a: 

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International Longevity Day - October 1, 2015

by Ilia Stambler

Dear Friends -

There has been emerging a tradition by longevity researchers and activists around the world to organize events dedicated to promotion of longevity research on or around October 1 – the UN International Day of Older Persons.

This day is sometimes referred to in some parts of the longevity activists community as the “International Longevity Day”. As this is the official UN Day of Older Persons, this provides the longevity research activists a perfect opportunity, perhaps even a perfect “excuse”, to emphasize the importance of aging and longevity research for the development of effective health care for the elderly, in the wide public as well as among decision makers.

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Smart Regulation For Smart Drugs

by Geoffrey Woo

“For the modern mad men and wolves of Wall Street, gone are the days of widespread day drinking and functional cocaine use. Instead, in this age of efficiency above all else, corporate climbers sometimes seek a simple brain boost, something to help them to get the job done without manic jitters or a nasty crash.

For that, they are turning to nootropics,” writes Jack Smith IV on the cover story for an April 2015 edition of the New York Observer.

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