Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Bioculture

PRODUCTIONS OF “CITIZEN CYBORG”
June 27-10
NYC, NY USA


Sorgner @ Beyond Humanism Conf: From Humanism to Post- and Transhumanism?
September 15-18
Seoul, S. Korea


Humanism and its prefixes (non-, trans-, post-, in-, a-)
October 3-4
Berkeley CA, USA




MULTIMEDIA: Bioculture Topics

The Awareness

What is the Future of Synthetic Meat?

Epistemic and Cognitive Concept of Explanation: An Attempt at Synthesis (30min)

Let’s kick oil while the price is down

Tissue Engineering Solutions for Cardiovascular Tissue Pathologies (32min)

The Role of Bioprinting in Rejuvenation (25min)

Molecular and Cellular Damage as the Cause of the Diseases of Aging (1:20min)

Curing Cancer in the Elderly Through Novel Strategies (31min)

Molecular Elucidation and Engineering of Stem Cell Therapies for the Nervous System

Cancer and Aging: Rival Demons? (31min)

Regulating a Damage Repair Approach to Cure the Diseases of Aging (55min)

The Rejuvenation of Aged Skeletal Muscle by Systematic Factors (18min)

Accelerating Knowledge Turns: The I-SPY Model and Drug Development (31min)

Why sitting is bad for you

Future Day Online




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Bioculture Topics




Life Extension is a Political Task

by Maria Konovalenko

Sooner or later the human life extension problem, the task of achieving immortality will become the main issue of government policies in developed countries of the world. This will happen on its own because of the exponential growth of technologies. At some point of time immortality will become the main political question. This is inevitable.



When Does Hindering Life Extension Science Become a Crime?

by Zoltan Istvan

Every human being has both a minimum and a maximum amount of life hours left to live. If you add together the possible maximum life hours of every living person on the planet, you arrive at a special number: the optimum amount of time for our species to evolve, find happiness, and become the most that it can be. Many reasonable people feel we should attempt to achieve this maximum number of life hours for humankind. After all, very few people actually wish to prematurely die or wish for their fellow humans’ premature deaths.



What Getting Thin Taught Me About Being Fat

by Valerie Tarico

Two years ago, at a small cabin in the San Juan Islands, I put a ladder on a slippery deck and stepped on it, and something happened that will surprise nobody but a woman utterly intent on fixing a rain gutter: it slipped off. I landed on one leg, fragmenting the knee joint. My husband hauled me to the beach and onto a boat and into a car, and ultimately I ended up at the best trauma center in the region, Harborview Hospital in Seattle.



The Tyranny of Happiness

by Mateus Stein

In The Tyranny of Happiness, the last chapter of Better than Well: American Medicine Meets the American Dream, the philosopher and bioethicist Carl Elliott explores how the ideal of a happy life can be systematically imposed to people under specific circumstances. Making myself clearer, in the aforesaid essay, Elliott employs a critical analysis of the pursuit for a happy life in the American society since about the period of the Declaration of Independence until the present days.



Butylated hydroxytoluene, BHT

by Alan Brooks

This author chose Butylated hydroxytoluene, BHT, to write about because it is an antioxidant and also possesses antiviral, antimicrobial, properties: thus as it is available at low cost it could offer a double bang for the buck. But then, as world-famous dentist Christian Szell would ask, “is it safe?”



Caplan: The case against care for those who are brain dead

by Arthur Caplan

Thirteen-year-old Jahi McMath died on Dec. 12 at Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. Yet about a month later, Jahi is still on a ventilator because her parents refuse to accept her death. Aided by a misguided legal decision, she has been moved to another facility to be kept on artificial life support, which makes no medical or moral sense. What’s being done to her corpse is wrong, but a bigger issue is the threat her case poses to the rational and moral use of health care resources.



These are the science stories to watch for in 2014

by George Dvorsky

With the holiday season now officially over, it’s time to look ahead and see what’s in store for the coming year. Here are the most anticipated scientific and technological developments of 2014!



Rewriting our DNA promises amazing benefits, experts say

by Dick Pelletier

What if you could improve memory and intelligence, and live in an ageless body – just by taking a pill? Though this may sound like the stuff of science fiction, experts are developing a better understanding of our genetic mysteries, including the powerful influence that DNA wields on our lives.



#6 Love-‘bots: future robots could become ideal lovers, experts say

by Dick Pelletier

Although some people might find the idea of love with a machine repulsive, experts predict that as the technology advances and robots become more human-like, we will view our silicon cousins in a friendlier light. As the future unfolds, robots will fill more roles as family caregivers, household servants, and voice-enabled avatars that manage our driverless cars, automated homes, and entertainment systems.



A Children’s Book Ponders Death

by Zoltan Istvan

Few children’s books touch on the theme of death. This is partially because our society deals with death as a dangerous and taboo topic. Many people feel they want to protect young minds from thinking about death at all. There is, however, a social movement afoot that treats the topic of death differently. Transhumanists believe that in the near future they will be able to eliminate death via the use of advanced medicine, science, and technology. Rather than fear or avoid death, they aim to fight directly against it.



#7 There Can Be No Healthy Aging

by Maria Konovalenko

The study, conducted by a team of scientists and clinicians from JCVI and WCHN, will focus on two groups of elderly individuals aged 65 to 85 years by correlating genetics with a variety of human genomic, gut microbiome and other “omics” profiles and integrating these data with the individuals’ health record. One group will consist of healthy individuals, and the other will have individuals with a variety of diagnosed health conditions.



#8 On GMO Plants

by Brenda Cooper

A number of people who I respect have written articles and chapters in books that support GMO crops. These include leading environmentalist Mark Lynas, author of The God Species: How the planet can survive the age of humans, and Ramez Naam, author of The Infinite Resource: The power of ideas on a finite planet.



Embracing Thanatophobia

by Peter Wicks

Is there a person alive today who does not fear dying? Well yes, if they are asleep or in a coma. But most of us, while we are awake and going about our business, harbour a deep-seated fear of dying. (“Thanatophobia”, in case anyone was wondering, being Greek for “fear of death”.)



Life Extension and Risk Aversion

by Gennady Stolyarov II

A major benefit of longer lifespans is the cultivation of a wide array of virtues. Prudence and forethought are among the salutary attributes that the lengthening of human life expectancies – hopefully to the point of eliminating any fixed upper bound – would bring about. Living longer renders people more hesitant to risk their lives, for the simple reason that they have many more years to lose than their less technologically endowed ancestors.



The Ethics of Chemical Castration (Part One)

by John Danaher

Chemical castration has been legally recognised and utilised as a form of treatment for certain types of sex offender for many years. This is in the belief that it can significantly reduce recidivism rates amongst this class of offenders. Its usage varies around the world. Nine U.S. states currently allow for it, as well as several European countries. Typically, it is presented as an “option” to sex offenders who are currently serving prison sentences. The idea being that if they voluntarily submit to chemical castration they can serve a reduced sentence.



Can the mind stay young forever? (Part Two)

by John Danaher

This is the second (and final) post in my short series on Michael Hauskeller’s article “Forever Young? Life Extension and the Ageing Mind”. In the article, Hauskeller casts a critical eye over the life extensionist project. According to many leading proponents of life extension, the goal is not just to prolong life indefinitely, but to prolong youth. Hauskeller argues that this goal is unobtainable because youth is dependent on both mind and body. And although it may be possible to halt the aging of the body, it will never be possible to halt the aging of the mind.



Future of surveillance: a world that anticipates our every move

by Dick Pelletier

  What kind of privacy will be left for humans in a future world of ubiquitous computing, with sensors everywhere, and with algorithms that draw alarmingly reliable inferences about our intentions and plans?



Will Today’s Handicapped Become Tomorrow’s First Post-Human?

by B. J. Murphy

Needs will almost always come before wants. When it comes to Transhumanism, the ability to differentiate the two tends to blur, because a need could also be a want, depending on the various methods of achieving a need. There’s the “getting by” need, and then there’s the “thriving” need.



“You May not Die” Exhibit Starts December 9th in Marat Guelman’s Gallery in Moscow

by Maria Konovalenko

One of the best art galleries in Moscow is going to host the first art exhibition about radical life extension – “You may not die”. This message is addressed primarily to the artistic community, and is a proposal for cooperation – let’s stand together and convince people that we have the opportunity to stay alive.



A Continuum of Personhood

by Jønathan Lyons

I have previously based my own ethical approach to interactions with other species on Jeremy Bentham’s derivation of rights from the ability to suffer. Bentham was a British philosopher and the founder of utilitarian philosophy (utilitarianism is “a theory in normative ethics holding that the proper course of action is the one that maximizes utility, usually defined as maximizing happiness and reducing suffering.”). As Bentham put it, “The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer?”



Is there such a thing as moral expertise?

by Massimo Pigliucci

Good question, right? I’ve been thinking more about it for a few weeks now as a result of an interesting talk by Gopal Sreenivasan (Duke University) entitled “Moral expertise and the proto-authority of affect,” which he gave at CUNY’s Graduate Center.



Love-‘bots: future robots could become ideal lovers, experts say

by Dick Pelletier

Although some people might find the idea of love with a machine repulsive, experts predict that as the technology advances and robots become more human-like, we will view our silicon cousins in a friendlier light. As the future unfolds, robots will fill more roles as family caregivers, household servants, and voice-enabled avatars that manage our driverless cars, automated homes, and entertainment systems.



Thanksgiving 2063: ‘Turkey Day’ 50 years into the future

by Dick Pelletier

Of course, no one can predict with 100% accuracy how the future will unfold, but by combining present day knowledge with anticipated advances, we can make plausible guesses about what to expect in 2063.



We Are All Dorian Grey Now

by Rick Searle

If someone on the street stopped and asked you what you thought was the meaning behind Oscar Wilde’s novel A Picture of Dorian Grey you’d probably blurt out, like the rest of us, that it had something to do with a frightening portrait, the dangers of pursuing immortality, and, if one remembered vague details about Wilde’s life, you might bring up the fact that it must have gotten him into a lot of trouble on account of its homoeroticism.



A Bold Visionary: An Interview with Stephen Valentine of Timeship

by Christine Gaspar

Set in the hot, Tuscany-like rolling hills of Comfort, Texas, northwest of San Antonio, is a project that is one of sciences’ best kept secrets, although it really isn’t a secret. On a 646 acre property, formerly known as the Bildarth Estate, lays the hopes and dreams of the creators of Timeship.



How to Stop Fear of Knowledge Undermining our Future

by Peter Wicks

We have all experienced the frustration of trying to impart some kind of knowledge only to be met with obviously fake arguments. What we may be less aware of, however, is the extent to which people come up with such arguments because they simply don’t want to know. And even if we are aware of this, we may not know what to do about it.



Inception: Lucid Dreaming as Radical Life Extension

by Jønathan Lyons

I teach a course on science fiction and futurism. As a result, sci-fi ideas often influence my transhumanist essays for the IEET. This essay is no exception.



Tomorrow’s Wars: bio-weapons, mind-control; is nothing sacred?

by Dick Pelletier

In The American Way of War, historian Russell Weigley describes a grinding strategy of destruction employed by the U.S. military over the last 150 years. To end the Civil War, Grant felt he had to destroy lee’s soldiers; in World War I, Pershing relentlessly bombarded and wore down Germany’s proud fighting machine; and the Army Air Corps pulverized major German and Japanese cities to win World War II.



Immortals, Posthumans – Require Regular Maintenance.

by Kamil Muzyka

Many transhumanist factions point out a need to gain some form of longevity or even immortality. The most common forms are mind upload, life extending drugs and treatments, body part replacement with prosthetics or “spare parts” and lastly, cryonics.



Zoe Bach’s ‘Quantum Zen’ as a ‘Third Way’ scientific religion

by Giulio Prisco

Zoltan Istvan’s bestseller The Transhumanist Wager, often reviewed as a rabid anti-religion manifesto, includes the foundations of a new, Cosmist scientific religion, a “Third Way” alternative to traditional belief based on science, but at the same time able to offer all the benefits of religion.

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