Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Bioculture

2014 Longevity and Genetics Conference: Vancouver
November 15
Vancouver


Cognition and Neuroethics in Science Fiction
March 20-21
Flint, Michigan, USA




MULTIMEDIA: Bioculture Topics

Consciousness and Neuroscience

Fusion: “Posthuman” - 3D Printed Tissues and Seeing Through Walls!

Is The Ebola Crisis (in the US) As Severe As The Media is Making It Out To Be?

Five Things Worth Knowing About Ebola

Winning the war on cancer?

When Do We Quarantine or Isolate for Ebola?

Open Source Biotech: Fund Anti-Cancer Research and Make Drugs Cheaper at the Same Time

Genetic engineering leads to glow-in-the-dark plants

Singularity 1 on 1: Take Steps and Be Prepared!

Watching the brain in action

Gene therapy spray: A breath of fresh air - Presentation

What is Bionanotechnology?

Nanotechnology to fight cancer

Color My Poop Beautiful – now on video

Politics & Abolition From Suffering




Subscribe to IEET Lists

Daily News Feed

Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List









Bioculture Topics




A New History of Prehistory - Part 1 & 2

by piero scaruffi

The Missing Mutation: Are We Really Smarter than our Ancestors? Several innovations that happened in the Neolithic seem to provide no advantage and sometimes create problems instead of solving them. About 10,000 years ago the burial ritual lasted a lifetime and the living were supposed to give offerings to the dead that were not valuable. At some point the burial ritual became much simpler but the living were supposed to give offerings to the dead that were valuable (e.g., food at times of starvation). Neither attitude makes a lot of sense from a materialistic viewpoint: what is the adaptive advantage of wasting goods and food for dead people? At the same time the cult of the dead moved from underground to aboveground (temples, pyramids), again an incredible waste of resources.



Stem cells and bioprinters take aim at heart disease, cancer, aging

by Dick Pelletier

Science and technology have utterly transformed humanity during my lifetime. Where forecasts of the future used to be measured in decades, today, new medical discoveries are announced almost weekly. This article focuses on cutting-edge research that promises a healthier and longer lifespan for all of us.



Google Glass: a wearable heads-up display and camera

by Jamais Cascio

Linked to your mobile device, able to do live recording, searches, route guidance, and more.



IEET Audience Passionate Science Fiction Fans

Four hundred people responded to the IEET poll on whether they were science fiction fans. More than half - 54%- said they were “canon-masters,” knowledgeable about science fiction from “H.G. Wells to Charlie Stross, Star Trek to Battlestar Galactica.”

Full Story...



A Survival Guide to Geoengineering

by Jamais Cascio

Despite its potential to trigger conflict, geoengineering will likely be part of the global response to climate change. Be prepared.





Life is already eternal, sort of…

by Rick Searle

What often strikes me when I put the claims of some traditionally religious people regarding “eternal life” and the stated goals of the much more recent, I suppose you could label it with the oxymoronic phrase “materialist spirituality”, next to one another is just how much of the language and fundamental assumptions regarding human immortality these very different philosophies share.



Indefinite lifespan possible in 20 years, expert predicts

by Dick Pelletier

New Google hire and renowned futurist Ray Kurzweil sums up how technologies might play out over the next two decades with this claim: “If you remain in good health for 20 more years, you may never die.”



Cheering Microbes Into Space!

by Darlene Cavalier

Science Cheerleader Wendy Brown, a graduate student in biomedical engineering, will recruit school kids and volunteers to collect microbial samples from a wide range of environments.





Could more than one singularity happen at the same time?

by Rick Searle

James Miller has an interesting looking new book out, Singularity Rising: Surviving and Thriving in a Smarter, Richer, and More Dangerous World.  I haven’t had a chance to pick up the book yet, but I did listen to a very engaging conversation about the book at Surprisingly Free.Miller is a true believer in the Singularity, the idea that at some point, from the next quarter century to the end of the 21st, our civilization will give rise to a greater than human intelligence which will rapidly bootstrap to a yet higher order of intelligence in such a way that we are unable to see past this event horizon in historical time.



Sentient machines: the next step in human evolution

by Dick Pelletier

Building machines that process information the same way a brain does has been a dream for over 50 years. Artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, and neural networks have all experienced some degrees of success, but machines still cannot recognize pictures or understand language as well as humans can.



At the frontiers of the science of health risk – five areas to watch

by Andrew Maynard

This week’s Risk Bites video takes a roller-coaster ride through some of the hottest topics in risk science.



Future Technology Could Eliminate the Need to Eat Food

by Dick Pelletier

By early 2030s, experts predict nanobots will be developed to improve the human digestive system, and by 2040 or before, as radical as this sounds, we could eliminate our need for food and eating.



Do You Want to be a Cyborg, or a Transhuman?

by Nikki Olson

The words “cyborg” and “transhuman” are frequently used interchangeably, but to what extent, and in what ways, do the concepts have the same referents? And which is the preferable concept to identify with when contemplating one’s own future?

Full Story...



A Global Civilization Heads for the Stars and Our Amazing Nanotechnology Future

by Dick Pelletier

Experts predict that over the next nine decades, exponential advances in biotech, nanotech, infotech, and cognitive sciences will enable humanity to evolve from a group of self-centered squabbling cultures to become a peaceful global village with amazing technological abilities.

During the last century, researchers unraveled one of humanity’s greatest mysteries: the nature of life. We discovered that the almost magical properties of living things, the ability to grow, heal and reproduce, was brought about by life’s molecular machinery.



Made for You

by Richard Stallman

Growing old, and having lost hope of finding love again, I read about the Lifemates Co-op and was intrigued.  “Mr or Ms Right doesn’t exist in nature.  If you want someone that was made for you, come to us.”  I made an appointment to visit their office and talk with a salesperson…



The Singularity: what to expect when machines get smarter than us

by Dick Pelletier

What can we expect when machines surpass humans in intelligence; a point in time that futurists predict could become reality by 2045. Though it’s impossible to forecast this far in advance with 100% accuracy, by combining predicted technology breakthroughs with present-day knowledge, we can make plausible guesses about how tomorrow’s super-intelligent machines might affect our lives.



#8 Any Sufficiently Advanced Civilization is Indistinguishable from Nature

by Rachel Armstrong

In Western cultures, nature is a cosmological, primal ordering force and a terrestrial condition that exists in the absence of human beings. Both meanings are freely implied in everyday conversation. We distinguish ourselves from the natural world by manipulating our environment through technology. In What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly proposes that technology behaves as a form of meta-nature, which has greater potential for cultural change than the evolutionary powers of the organic world alone.



Promoting the Use of Clean Stoves in the Developing World

by Lee-Roy Chetty

Promoting the use of clean stoves in the developing world can contribute to the broader development objectives of reducing poverty, improving health and gender equality, and mitigating climate change.




I’m Just a Love Machine

by Jamais Cascio

Artifice and Consent in the Age of Robotics

The notion of robot love has a long history, and by far the dominant emphasis has been on its erotic manifestation. After all, the reasoning goes, a sufficiently advanced robot would offer all of the physical pleasure of a real partner with no emotional entanglements, personal judgments, or dissipating affections, in an un-aging body that can be sculpted to look exactly as one desires. Famous movie actors and actresses might even set up a lucrative side-business licensing their own bodily images to robot manufacturers, even long after time and nature had taken a toll.



Death by (lack of a) drugs (culture)

by Marcelo Rinesi

A recent report from the Los Angeles Times underscored what amounts to an epidemic of deaths in the US caused at least in part by overdoses of legally prescribed drugs. The root problem, though, is one of cultural technology rather than chemistry or regulation.

Full Story...



There’s no alternative to ecological interventionism

by Marcelo Rinesi

If we want the ecosystem richness we once had, we are going to have to let go of the ecosystems we have left.

Full Story...



Future of war: bioweapons, cyber-warfare, mind-control and more

by Dick Pelletier

In The American Way of War, historian Russell Weigley describes a grinding strategy of destruction employed by the U.S. military over the last 150 years. To end the Civil War, Grant felt he had to destroy lee’s soldiers; in World War I, Pershing relentlessly bombarded and wore down Germany’s proud fighting machine; and the Army Air Corps pulverized major German and Japanese cities to win World War II.



No Dystopian Future For Me!

by Kris Notaro

How can we save our planet, ourselves, and increase the quality of life world wide?



Hurricane Sandy and Climate Change

by Ramez Naam

Hurricane Sandy fizzled out over Quebec Wednesday morning, leaving a trail of devastation along the US East Coast and into southern Ontario. As I write this, Sandy’s death toll stands at 132 people – 71 in the Caribbean and 61 in the United States. Since making landfall in the US, it flooded the New York City subway system, left 8 million people without electricity (6.5 million of whom still lack it), destroyed the Atlantic City boardwalk, and shut down the New York Stock Exchange for 2 days.  Estimates of its economic damage are up to $50 billion, making it the 2nd most expensive storm in US history, after Hurricane Katrina, which devastated New Orleans.



When Hope is Unethical

by Marcelo Rinesi

With the best of intentions, climate scientists might be doing an ethical disservice to the world.

Full Story...



Is there an Ecological Architectural Design Method?

by Rachel Armstrong

A talk on nature, ecology, synthetic biology and the machines of living grace, delivered to architecture students at the University of Greenwich, October 10th, 2012

Full Story...



BioLime: The Mock Rock

by Rachel Armstrong

Climate change in the small town of Mossville is tackled by creating a rock-like salt that “energizes” their buildings. “Science Faction” / Biochemistry / Metabolic Architecture

Full Story...



The Biggest Problem of All: The End of the World is Coming?

by piero scaruffi

Paul Ehrlich recently gave a talk that listed eight major catastrophic environmental problems that are coming sooner than even pessimists predict… should we create a “culture of panic”?

Full Story...



Google Street View, Now Underwater

by Breki Tomasson

While Apple is doing their best to manage the fiasco that is their iOS 6 map roll out, Google has decided to start adding underwater shots to Google Maps, starting with the Great Barrier Reef.

Full Story...



Melancholia, the Game

by Jamais Cascio

Plague, Inc., by Ndemic Creations, is an iDevice game with a simple story: you’re a plague, and your goal is to wipe out the human race.

Full Story...

Page 8 of 23 pages ‹ First  < 6 7 8 9 10 >  Last ›

HOME | ABOUT | FELLOWS | STAFF | EVENTS | SUPPORT  | CONTACT US
SECURING THE FUTURE | LONGER HEALTHIER LIFE | RIGHTS OF THE PERSON | ENVISIONING THE FUTURE
CYBORG BUDDHA PROJECT | AFRICAN FUTURES PROJECT | JOURNAL OF EVOLUTION AND TECHNOLOGY

RSSIEET Blog | email list | newsletter |
The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States.

Contact: Executive Director, Dr. James J. Hughes,
56 Daleville School Rd., Willington CT 06279 USA 
Email: director @ ieet.org     phone: 860-297-2376