Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Access



MULTIMEDIA: Access Topics

What Carries Our Personal Identity?

All your devices can be hacked

Powerful Nonsense Ep 95 - Finding meaning in an automated world

Switzerland: Basic Income ‘Robot’ causes a commotion in Davos

Chris Hables Gray on Singularity 1 on 1: We Need Strong Citizenship!

Dead Bodies, Naked Women or Money. Which Excites You More?

Let’s design social media that drives real change

Mira Kwak - Nigeria ICT Fest 2015

Understanding exponential change

Future of Technology: the new question is WHY not IF

Aubrey de Grey - Nigeria ICT Fest 2015

Technology versus Humanity: a provocative film by Futurist Speaker Gerd Leonhard

One Happy Story - The Citizen’s Basic Income

068: Does Life Have Meaning in a World Without Work?

We can programme you to live forever: The Register Winter Lectures, 2015




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Access Topics




Le choix d’une vie très longue en bonne santé : pourquoi ? (4/4) : Effets écono

by Marc Roux

Dernière partie dédiée à la réflexion sur “Le choix d’une vie très longue en bonne santé : pourquoi?” Préserver et renforcer la part de l’économie non marchande L’accroissement d’abord progressif, puis éventuellement considérable de la durée de vie en bonne santé a commencé depuis longtemps par se traduire par une augmentation de la quantité d’activité fournie par des personnes curieusement qualifiées par les statistiques françaises de « non-actives ».



Gerontological Manifesto

by Alexey Matveyevich Olovnikov

The necessity to create various remedies for degenerative age-related diseases is beyond any doubts. But this process is somewhat like a Sisyphean task, because the aging of each person only deepens over time, persistently destroying the results of treatment. Pharma is forced to deal with the countless consequences, rather than with their cause. The primary cause of aging is still deeply buried in gerontological terra incognita. Meanwhile, a growing and imminent new threat for humankind is becoming increasingly apparent. This threat is the increasing aging of the human population as a whole.



Basic Income is certain, but ‘they’ will wait as long as they can to implement it.

by Khannea Suntzu

Looking at the barrage of news on technological unemployment, we may get lucky and avoid the predictable denialism phase altogether. A lot of time gets wasted on denying things that are inescapable. We may get lucky, as in “we might avoid a massively disfunctional dystopian future full of mass-poverty and the consequences thereof“.

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New Evidence Suggests Human Beings Are a Geological Force of Nature

by George Dvorsky

For years, the term “Anthropocene” has been used to informally describe the human era on Earth. But new evidence suggests there’s nothing informal about it. We’re a true force of nature — and there’s good reason to believe we’ve sparked a new and unprecedented geological epoch.



Le choix d’une vie très longue en bonne santé : pourquoi ? (3/4) : Effets possibles

by Marc Roux

Poursuite de la réflexion sur “Le choix d’une vie très longue en bonne santé : pourquoi?”



Danaher Publishes The Threat of Algocracy: Reality, Resistance and Accommodation

IEET Affiliate Scholar John Danaher has a new paper in the journal Philosophy and Technology.

Full Story...
Link to Philosophy and Technology



The Internet of Things and the Great Recalibration

by Anthony Miccoli

I’ve been playing catch-up since my tenure application and my class preps for the Spring semester, but I’ve finally been able to re-engage with my usual sites, and all of the fantastic content in my Google+ communities.  One thing that’s been coming up in various iterations is the concept of the “internet of things.” In a nutshell, the term loosely (and, I think perhaps a little misleadingly) refers to a technological interconnectivity of everyday objects: clothes, appliances, industrial equipment, jewelry, cars, etc, now made possible by advancements in creating smaller microprocessors.

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Le choix d’une vie très longue en bonne santé : pourquoi ? (2/4) : Effets possibles

by Marc Roux

On ne peut rester indéfiniment « damné de la Terre »



Radical Life Extension can be Developed Quickly for the Mainstream: Interview with Didier Coeurnelle

by Hank Pellissier

Didier Coeurnelle is a leading European spokesperson in the radical life extension movement, plus he’s an IEET Advisory Board member. I queried him on via email on his anti-aging activities and opinions.

IEET: Let’s being with you introducing yourself and the groups you work with.

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Genetic editing and the tyranny of opinion

by Russell Blackford

Do we need a broad consensus in society before rolling out vital new medical therapies?

CRISPR-Cas9 is a dramatic development in genetic technology. It is a powerful, relatively simple, and increasingly precise technique for editing the DNA of living organisms. Its potential application to human beings was highlighted in April 2015, when researchers in China reported their experiments on non-viable human zygotes.

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“We Want to Stop Diseases that Hold Us Back at Every Age” - LongeCity interview with Peter Caramico

by Hank Pellissier

LongeCity is a high-functioning life extension organization with a forum where 30,000 members share their cutting-edge health knowledge. But that’s not all. To learn everything about the multiple offerings of this spectacular group, I interviewed Peter Carimico, the Lead Navigator. 

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The Philosophy of Games and the Postwork Utopia

by John Danaher

I want to start with a thought experiment: Suppose the most extreme predictions regarding technological unemployment come to pass. The new wave of automating technologies take over most forms of human employment. The result is that there is no economically productive domain for human workers to escape into. Suppose, at the same time, that we all benefit from this state of affairs. In other words, the productive gains of the technology do not flow solely to a handful of super-wealthy capitalists; they are fairly distributed to all (perhaps through an guaranteed income scheme). Call this the ‘postwork’ world. What would life be like in such a world?



#1: Seven Emerging Technologies That Will Change the World Forever

by Gray Scott

According to IEET readers, what were the most stimulating stories of 2015? This month we’re answering that question by posting a countdown of the top 30 articles published this year on our blog (out of more than 1,000), based on how many total hits each one received.

The following piece was first published here on September 29, 2015,  and is the #1 most viewed of the year.

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Survival of Extremely Premature Infants Opens New Ethical Decisions

by Valerie Tarico

Changes in what we can do always lead to new questions about what we should do—questions about what is prudent or loving or wise, about what serves human well-being or even that of the broader web of life. Recent medical advances around resuscitation and life support for extremely premature infants are no exception, and new options have opened a set of difficult conversations that many would rather avoid.



#7: Ten Health Benefits of Marijuana

by Marc Howard

According to IEET readers, what were the most stimulating stories of 2015? This month we’re answering that question by posting a countdown of the top 30 articles published this year on our blog (out of more than 1,000), based on how many total hits each one received.

The following piece was first published here on August 29, 2015,  and is the #7 most viewed of the year.

Full Story...



Paranoia, Conspiracies and Surveillance

by David Brin

== Another summons to resigned despair ==

Conspiracy theories abound.  They erupt out of human nature, it seems, and your ethnicity or caste or political leanings only affect which direction you credit with devilish cleverness, secret power and satanic values. For sure, as a science fiction author I can concoct plausible schemes and plots with the best of them!  Indeed, let me add that some real life cabals are so blatant and proudly obvious that you just have to admit – sometimes “they” are completely real and up to awful mischief.



Online Transhumanist Academy: The “School of Accelerating Technologies”

The new School of Accelerating Technologies is now open, and offering academic degrees for advanced professional (microdegree) studies in:
 
•  Longevity and Life Extension
•  Introductory Singularity and Transhumanism  
•  Accelerated Innovation and Creative Problem Solving
•  Space Habitat Design and Construction
•  Artificial Intelligence and Brain Simulation

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Agnosticism Regarding the Meaning of Life

by John G. Messerly

For the past ten days I have discussed various thinkers whom I’d classify as agnostic on the question of life’s meaning. I’d like to summarize and reflect on all of the now.



Will Our Descendants Survive the Destruction of the Universe?

by George Dvorsky

Billions of years from now, the universe as we know it will cease to exist. The good news is, that gives us a lot of time to prepare, and maybe even figure out a way to cheat cosmic death. Here are some possible ways our descendants might survive a cosmological apocalypse.



Hacktivism: The 21st Century Solution to Communications Disruption

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

My father went to Vietnam. As an ROTC member in college, he had no choice—serve or go to prison. Not being a fan of prison, he went. My father was also an electrical engineer and lifelong ham radio hobbyist. As a result, when he arrived in the hot, sweaty jungles of Vietnam he wasn’t sent to the front line, instead he was assigned to building the communications towers that would keep the US army and its allies connected throughout the war.



#25: Transhumanism - The Final Religion?

by Dirk Bruere

According to IEET readers, what were the most stimulating stories of 2015? This month we’re answering that question by posting a countdown of the top 30 articles published this year on our blog (out of more than 1,000), based on how many total hits each one received.

The following piece was first published here on July 15, 2015, and is the #25 most viewed of the year.

Full Story...



Star Trek Philosophy: “We Were Like You Once, But We Evolved”

by B. J. Murphy

The following dialogue below took place on Star Trek: Enterprise, on episode 18, season 2, titled “The Crossing.” It was between members of the Enterprise crew (Captain Archer, Commander T’Pol, and Lieutenant Reed) and a non-corporeal alien entity known as the Wisp, of which they discuss the Wisp’s past biological existence and how they evolved into a non-corporeal species.



Scientific Illiteracy and the Coming Singularity

by Gareth John

Anyone who’s read any of my previous posts will already know that I am, let us say, technologically challenged. Some twenty years ago I studied towards a PhD in Tibetan Studies and Classical Sanskrit and Tibetan languages. Alas, since then with this knowledge unused it has faded away although I can still say Chandamaharoshana Tantra without bringing on a manic mood swing.



Proliferated Futuristic Weaponry: World’s First 3-D Printed Revolver

by B. J. Murphy

In light of the recent news where the Australian government officially criminalized the mere act of owning blueprints to 3D print a gun, it certainly raises the question of how other countries will handle the future prospect of advanced 3D printed weaponry. The ownership of a gun is already a controversial topic currently being debated here in the United States, and with 3D printed guns now being added into the mix, the controversy is likely to become exacerbated.



Desiderata for a Model of Human Values

by Kaj Sotala

Soares (2015) defines the value learning problem as: By what methods could an intelligent machine be constructed to reliably learn what to value and to act as its operators intended?



Star Trek Philosophy: “Killing Is Wrong, No Matter Who’s Doing It”

by B. J. Murphy

The following dialogue below took place on Star Trek: Voyager, on episode 13, season 7, titled “Repentance.” It was between Seven of Nine (whom is a former Borg drone) and the Doctor (whom is a holographic emergency medical physician), of which they discuss the morality (or lack thereof) behind the act of killing another living being.



Obfuscation: protect privacy by destroying the Web!

by David Brin

Time for a return to the core issue of our time: how shall we best preserve and extend freedom?  Along with freedom’s contingent benefits, like privacy?

In the LA Review of Books, Internet Privacy: Stepping Up Our Self-Defense Game, Evan Selinger reviews a slim book—Obfuscation: A User’s Guide for Privacy and Protest, by Finn Brunton and Helen Nissenbaum.



Benefiting from Exponentials Globally

by David Orban

Singularity University is expanding through the SingularityU Global program. The launch of SingularityU Milan, the first Italian chapter, is part of this program. It allows orders of magnitude more people to directly participate in its events and leverage the power of exponential technologies.



Moral and Legal Imperatives for Sentient A.I. - Terasem Colloquium in Second Life Dec. 10th

by Giulio Prisco

The 2015 edition of the Terasem Annual Colloquium on the Law of Futuristic Persons, themed “Moral and Legal Imperatives for Sentient AI” will take place in Second Life – Terasem sim – on December 10, with Zoltan Istvan and Jack Sarfatti among the speakers.



“Prior art” is just a fancy term for “too slow lawyering up”  (Short story)

by Marcelo Rinesi

They used to send a legal ultimatum before it happened. Now you just wake up one day and everything green is dead, because the plants are biotech and counter-hacking is a legal response to intellectual property theft, even if the genes in question are older than the country that granted the patent.

Full Story...

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