Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Access

2014 Longevity and Genetics Conference: Vancouver
November 15
Vancouver




MULTIMEDIA: Access Topics

Review The Future: What is the Future of Education?

Is the UN up to the job?

Open Source Biotech: Fund Anti-Cancer Research and Make Drugs Cheaper at the Same Time

Newberry Geothermal Project (Can power a city of 80,000 people!)

The Point Of View Of The Universe and The Life You Can Save

Nanotechnology to fight cancer

Politics & Abolition From Suffering

A message about the power of free expression

Access for Everyone: A Model for Free Online Learning, with Duolingo’s Luis von Ahn

The Near Future Of Implantable Technology

Achieving Personal Immortality Roadmap

What’ll be the Impacts of Self Driving Cars?

On Lab Meat / in vitro meat

Feeling Groovy: Genetic Intervensions & Wonder Drugs

American Society for Engineering Education: Why Diversity is so Important




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Access Topics




Who’s More Luddite?

by Harry J. Bentham

Who is more “luddite”: the individual or the state? In a recent TED talk, an individual – the robot body of National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden speaking in Vancouver – said he beat the state. He argued that, while the internet enabled states with unprecedented powers to spy, it has also provided individuals with the ability to singlehandedly “win” against the state by exposing such abuse to the public.



Bioethicist Arthur Caplan receives 2014 Public Service Award for an individual

Caplan’s work fosters greater understanding of science, medicine and ethics. On March 24, 2014 the National Science Board (NSB) announced that renowned bioethicist and IEET Trustee Arthur Caplan, a global leader in medical ethics, is the 2014 recipient of its Public Service Award for an individual.

Full Story...
Link to National Science Foundation



Conscience Creep: How “Religious Freedom” Spiraled Out of Control

by Valerie Tarico

Secular Americans and many liberal people of faith have been horrified by the Right’s most recent ploy: “religious freedom” claims that would give conservative business owners license to discriminate. Until Arizona made the national spotlight, the need for lunch counter sit-ins had seemed like a thing of the past. But in reality, advocates for religious privileges have been circling toward this point for some time.



Scientists Create Genetically Modified Cells That Protect Against HIV

by George Dvorsky

The treatment is considered radical, and the results were drawn from a small scale human trial, but for the first time in medical history, researchers have boosted their patients’ ability to fight HIV by replacing some of their natural immune cells with genetically modified versions.



How the Web Will Implode

by Rick Searle

Jeff Stibel is either a genius when it comes to titles, or has one hell of an editor. The name of his recent book Breakpoint: Why the web will implode, search will be obsolete, and everything you need to know about technology is in your brain was about as intriguing as I had found a title, at least since The Joys of X. In many ways, the book delivers on the promise of its title, making an incredibly compelling argument for how we should be looking at the trend lines in technology, a book which is chalk full of surprising and original observations.



Ethical Arguments for the Use of Cognitive Enhancing Drugs (Part Two)

by J. Hughes

There are four ethical arguments I want to bring to bear on behalf of cognitive enhancing drugs, roughly in order of their historical provenance.



The Labor Transition: Shall we prepare for an “end of work”?

by Marc Roux

In a time of emerging technologies, while artificial intelligence and adaptability of robots is getting better, a new problem may come up: will machines monopolize all active positions in our society? This fear is already topical and enabled resurgence and modernization of the Luddite thinking.(1)



Are We Obligated to Make Ourselves More Moral and Intelligent? (Part One)

by J. Hughes

Most of the ethical discussion of the use of stimulant drugs without a prescription in education has been negative, associating their use with performance enhancement in sports and with drug abuse. But the use of stimulants as study drugs actually has few side effects, and is almost entirely applied to the student’s primary obligation, academic performance. In this essay I consider some objections to off-label stimulant use, and to stimulant therapy for ADD, and argue that there are ethical arguments for the use of stimulants, and for future cognitively and morally enhancing therapies, in education, the work place, and daily life.



Taxonomy of Technological Unemployment Solutions (and Defeaters)

by Jon Perry

This article represents my latest attempt to categorize the possible solutions to technological unemployment. It’s largely based on episode 14 of my Review the Future Podcast so for a more detailed treatment of this topic, you can listen here.



How To Survive The Pre-Singularity Era: Part II: Time Is Muscle

by Christine Gaspar

It can be said that practitioners of emergency medicine have their own unique language. As a member of this subset of healthcare, I can unequivocally agree that we have invented pseudonyms, algorithms, protocols, expressions and even our unique brand of humour to give expression to what we do every day. Codes come in various colours- blue, black, white, yellow, orange… in order to succinctly convey an emergency in a manner that is efficient, and somewhat covert from the unsuspecting public.



Mind-to-mind thought talking possible by 2030, scientist says

by Dick Pelletier

Today we enjoy basic conversations with our smart phone, desktop PC, games console, TV and soon, our car; but voice recognition, many believe, should not be viewed as an endgame technology. Although directing electronics with voice and gestures may be considered state-of-the-art today, we will soon be controlling entertainment and communications equipment not by talking or waving; but just by thinking!



Wall-E, The Sofalarity, and the Problem with “Super Now” Predictions

by Jon Perry

The Wall-E vision of the future, or what this New Yorker article dubs the “sofalarity”, is not believable to me. It’s a classic mistake of prediction that I like to refer to as “super now.” When making super now predictions, people simply take things that are happening right now and imagine that the future will be just like now only “more extreme.”



Three-Parent Babies Are an Ethical Choice

by Arthur Caplan

The FDA is considering approving an experiment to repair a genetic disease in humans by creating embryos with DNA from three parents. Genes would be transferred from a healthy human egg to one that has a disease and the “repaired” egg then fertilized in the hope that a healthy baby will result. The goal of the experiment in genetic engineering is not a perfect baby but a healthy baby.



Capitalism, Free Enterprise And Progress: Partners Or Adversaries?

by Darian Worden

The Industrial Revolution is typically regarded as a story of capitalism, free enterprise, and progress in technology and living standards. This paper attempts to disentangle the threads of capitalism, free enterprise, and progress, in the context of the Industrial Revolution, with a focus on Britain and the United States. It aims to bring some historical perspectives into the current discourse.



What’s Limiting the Impact of GMOs on Global Food Security?

by Ramez Naam

My friend Jon Foley, who I have a great deal of respect for, has a piece up arguing that GMOs have failed to improve global food security because they fall into a trap of reductionist thinking. With due respect to Jon, I see this a different way.



Putting “Death is Wrong” in Children’s Hands

by Gennady Stolyarov II

After three days of fundraising (in conjunction with the Movement for Indefinite Life Extension) to provide 1000 children with free copies of my illustrated book on indefinite life extension, Death is Wrong, I am pleased to report some promising and exciting developments.



Earth 2314: Humanity scatters its populations to the stars

by Dick Pelletier

After rising from the primordial soup 3.5 billion years ago, Earth life began an evolutionary trip that has produced today’s amazing human. Futurists now ponder what’s next. Stephen Hawking, Michio Kaku, Thomas Frey, Ray Kurzweil, and other forward-thinkers believe technologies will advance exponentially in the centuries ahead, creating sweeping changes in how we view life, our planet, and the cosmos.



The Right to be or not to be Disabled: A Response to the Center for Genetics and Society: (CGS)

by Evan Reese

In a recent newsletter, The Center for Genetics and Society (CGS) is asking people to sign a letter they’ve drafted requesting the FDA not approve clinical trials of a genetic therapy which could prevent thousands of children a year here in the U.S. from being born with serious disabilities. So how does that square with their claim to be for the rights of the disabled?



10 Reasons To Call For More Than $10.10 as a Minimum Wage

by Richard Eskow

President Obama signed an executive order on Wednesday, January 28 of 2014 raising the minimum wage for some federally contracted workers to $10.10. This move illustrates the fact that we need a higher minimum wage for all workers. It also promotes the bill by Sen. Tom Harkin and Rep. George Miller that would raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2015.



Personalized Drone Delivery: the new Personal Computer?

by Melanie Swan

Miniaturization, robotics, and the hastening automation economy are coming together in interesting new ways. Personal drone delivery services could be a fast-arriving concept. Amazon announced PrimeAir in November 2013, to possibly be ready for launch in 2015 pending US FAA regulations of personal drone airspace.



Innovations to help us conquer space

by David Brin

I just attended the NASA Innovative and Advance Concepts group (NIAC) symposium at Stanford —(I am on NIAC's Council of External Advisors)—watching and appraising and questioning terrific presentations about future-potential "game-changing" space technologies.  In four days the recipients of NIAC seed grants, showed us how NASA's small but strategic investments in exceptional… even risky… technologies might prove valuable—even vital—if given a chance.



Project Citizen Through the Lens of Big History

by Dustin Eirdosh

The future of civic education may just lie in the past - the deep past that is. Here at the PEAR Lab we are hard at work weaving a new thread within the acclaimed civics curriculum Project Citizen - to enable to students to explore public policy issues through the lens of Big History. Let me briefly review Why we must do this, How we plan to get it done, and finally, What it is looking like.



Proposal for International Zones

by R. Dennis Hansen

I hope there will someday be an “International Social Contract” (ISC), based on Enlightenment principles, that allows people who enter into it to live in host countries around the world in a way that is respectful and beneficial to all parties. The goal would be to create explicit agreements that allow members of an ISC to move freely between “International Zones” (IZs) without inflaming right-wing groups or encouraging the abuse of local citizens or indigenous cultures.



Healthier, Stronger, More Youthful You by 2024, Experts Predict

by Dick Pelletier

In just ten years, many of today’s older citizens might look in the mirror and ask, “Who is that gorgeous person?” Their reflection would reveal a revitalized body overflowing with enthusiasm, sporting a dazzling smile, wrinkle-free skin, perfect vision, natural hair color, real teeth, and an amazing mind and memory.



5 Obnoxious Libertarian Oligarchs Who Earned Fortunes from the Government They’d Like to Destroy

by Richard Eskow

These highly privileged and highly unaware individuals have been inappropriately lionized by society.The cult of the libertarian-minded ultra-weatlhy would make an intriguing anthropological case study. But it would be a case study with a twist: its research subjects increasingly control our economy, our politics, and even our personal lives. We’re dealing with a cohort of highly fortunate, highly privileged and highly unaware individuals who have been inappropriately lionized by society. That lionization has led them to believe that their wealth and accomplishments are their own doing, rather than the fruits of collaborative effort – effort which in many cases was only made possible through government support.



The End of Nation States May Enhance Humanity

by Harry J. Bentham

Perhaps parallel to the physical enhancement of human ability and longevity through technology, enhancements to civilization must also have cultural and political forms. By far the most important of these could be the neglect and final dissolution of borders and “nations”.



Defeating aging, and the avenues ahead of us: Part 3

by Eric Schulke

There is a nice, succinct “Roadmap to Immortality” (http://mariakonovalenko.files.wordpress.com

/2013/01/roadmap_immortality_eng.pdf
) that is great for visualizing the big picture of the pathways that could take us to indefinite life extension. Teachers like mine have been telling students that there is probably no way forward to defeating aging. I like to think of this roadmap as the totality of the response that rose to meet that challenge.



Defeating aging, and the avenues ahead of us: Part 2

by Eric Schulke

With a clear way forward, what are we waiting for? If we get this done, then we can probably live indefinitely. Can humans be so mentally slothful and negligent that they would be able to do all kinds of things on microscopic scales and yet not be able to clear damage out of biology? Does anybody really think that most mitochondrial proteins can make it through the TIM/TOM complex, but that it’s out of the question for the rest of them?



Earth 2050 and beyond: enhanced immortal humans head for the stars

by Dick Pelletier

What can we expect from our high-tech future? Of course, no one can forecast with 100% accuracy how our lives will progress; but if we look at what experts predict might become possible over the next two-to-three decades; and then blend in some scenarios that push the envelope – an incredible time begins to take form.



Life Extension is a Political Task

by Maria Konovalenko

Sooner or later the human life extension problem, the task of achieving immortality will become the main issue of government policies in developed countries of the world. This will happen on its own because of the exponential growth of technologies. At some point of time immortality will become the main political question. This is inevitable.

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