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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Health



MULTIMEDIA: Health Topics

NASA IMAX: The Earth - Blue Planet [HD 1080p]

How I help transgender teens become who they want to be

The Neuroscience of Learning and Memory and Mindfulness Based Mind Coaching

We Will Live Again: A Look Inside a Cryonics Laboratory

How Positive Psychology/Thinking is Concealing some of the Real Causes of our Collective Suffering

The Next Captain America is YOU

The Future of Being Human

Designing Compassionate Ecosystems and Genetically Engineering the Ending of Suffering

On the Origin of Suffering

Moral Enhancement

Bionic connections: Interfacing with the nervous system

Scary, Thought-provoking, Futurist Prank by Singularity 1 on 1

On Technoprogressivism (Full Interview)

Suspended Animation - Now For Humans

The Hedonistic Imperative vs The Abolitionist Project The Differences




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Health Topics




Does radical enhancement threaten our sense of self?

by John Danaher

If we extended our lives by 200 years, or if we succeeded in uploading our minds to an artificial substrate, would we undermine our sense of personal identity? If so, would it be wiser to avoid such radical forms of enhancement? These are the questions posed in chapter 4 of Nicholas Agar’s book Truly Human Enhancement. Over the next two posts I’ll take a look at Agar’s answers. This is all part of my ongoing series of reflections on Agar’s book.



Study Gerontology! This Frontier Provides Hope for the Future

by Eric Schulke

The Boston Globe reported that enrollment in the UMass Boston undergraduate gerontology program has fallen by two-thirds, to a mere 13 students, over the last decade. A relaunch in 2010 failed to yield more students. For that reason, UMass Boston’s decision to suspend the gerontology undergraduate program was a bow to reality. 



The human trek: from crude beginnings to an immortal future

by Dick Pelletier

Historians place the beginning of culture about 10,000 years ago, when our early ancestors abandoned hunter-gathering in favor of settling into communities, cultivating crops, and domesticating live stock.



Will sex workers be replaced by robots? (A Precis)

by John Danaher

I recently published an article in the Journal of Evolution and Technology on the topic of sex work and technological unemployment (available here, here and here). It began by asking whether sex work, specifically prostitution (as opposed to other forms of labour that could be classified as “sex work”, e.g. pornstar or erotic dancer), was vulnerable to technological unemployment. It looked at contrasting responses to that question, and also included some reflections on technological unemployment and the basic income guarantee.



War and Human Evolution

by Rick Searle

Has human evolution and progress been propelled by war? The question is not an easy one to ask, not least because war is not merely one of the worst but arguably the worst thing human beings inflict on one another comprising murder, collective theft, and, almost everywhere but in the professional militaries of Western powers, and only quite recently, mass, and sometimes systematic rape.



Geeking Out on the Science of Risk

by Andrew Maynard

Danger and death are part and parcel of being alive. But with a few notable exceptions, it’s hard to find straightforward information online on how to make sense of stuff that potentially threaten our health and wellbeing. Which is a pity, because as well as being important for making smart decisions, there’s some really cool science behind how what we touch, breathe, eat, or otherwise come into contact with affects our health.



Soil as an Organism

by Brenda Cooper

I live in Washington State, and all the news for the last two weeks has been the unthinkable Oso mudslide.  Slides are not unusual here, although I have never heard of one with this much destructive force.  It got me reflecting about the relationship between earth and water.



21st Century: a brief trek through our technology-rich future

by Dick Pelletier

Since the beginning of the 21st century, there’s no question that humankind has made tremendous strides in developing new technologies. While machines can replicate many movements and actions of humans, the next challenge lies in teaching them to think for themselves and react to changing conditions.



The Objective and Anthropocentric Ideals of Enhancement

by John Danaher

Nicholas Agar has written several books about the ethics of human enhancement. In his latest, Truly Human Enhancement, he tries to stake out an interesting middle ground in the enhancement debate. Unlike the bioconservatives, Agar is not opposed to the very notion of enhancing human capacities. On the contrary, he is broadly in favour it. But unlike the radical transhumanists, he does not embrace all forms of enhancement.



10 Reasons Millennials Should Be Wary of Rand Paul’s Libertarianism

by Richard Eskow

Republican Senator Rand Paul has been making a big play for millennials lately, most notably by taking his civil liberties pitch to colleges around the country. Paul has got the right idea when he says his party must “evolve, adapt or die” (although I think the first two are virtually the same thing). Katie Glueck of Politico wrote that “The Kentucky senator drew a largely friendly reception at the University of California-Berkeley as he skewered the intelligence community.”



Quest for immortality spurs breakthroughs in human-machine merge

by Dick Pelletier

By mid-century or before, many future followers predict the pace of technological progress in genetics, nanotechnology and artificial intelligence will become so fast that humans will undergo radical evolution. By the 2030s, we'll be deluged with medical breakthroughs that promise a forever youthful state of being.



I Am Cyborg, Hear Me Roar: The Feeling of Pain is SO Last Century

by B. J. Murphy

The tattoo on my right upper forearm is that of a polypeptide chain of the neurotransmitter Substance P. This neurotransmitter is responsible for the feeling of pain being transmitted to the central nervous system. Next to it says “RNAi This!” RNAi (Ribonucleic acid interference) is responsible for determining what genes are turned on and what are turned off.



Beyond Homophobia: The Even Bigger Reason to Avoid World Vision

by Valerie Tarico

In a media frenzy akin to the Komen scandal, Evangelical aid organization World Vision announced recently that it would allow legally married and monogamous queer Christians on its payroll. Conservative co-religionists, including Franklin Graham of Billy Graham Ministries, and Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Convention took to the media denouncing the decision as a violation of biblical Christianity and all that is good. 



Spreading the Word That Death is Wrong

by Gennady Stolyarov II

Who could have thought a month ago that an illustrated children’s book on indefinite life extension would become a fiercely, passionately discussed phenomenon not just in transhumanist and futurist circles, but on mainstream publications and forums? And yet that is exactly what has happened to Death is Wrong – certainly the most influential and provocative of all of my endeavors to date



Future of love and sex: monogamy no longer the default, say experts

by Dick Pelletier

There’s a pervasive notion that monogamous relationships are the end-all-be-all – the default pact in human couplings that keep the fabric of society from being torn apart. But growing numbers of scientists believe monogamy is not our biological default; and may not even represent the best road to happiness.



The Massive Danger of Societal Nihilism

by Khannea Suntzu

Just a short while, a researcher by the name of Safa Motesharri came out with an article that got some support from NASA. NASA at least put some money in that study, and it caught on in the media that the story was an officially NASA sanctioned, supported or otherwise prominent study. It isn't but that does not make the conclusions in the study any more relevant.



Why Religious Leaders are Speaking Up in Support of Universal Contraceptive Access

by Valerie Tarico

As the Supreme Court reviews the Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Woods cases in coming weeks, attorneys for the business owners will argue that their religious freedom (and that of the corporations!) is being violated by the Obamacare contraceptive mandate. But not all religious leaders agree.



The Element of Air

by Brenda Cooper

Every year, we science fiction fans are given the opportunity to vote on a host city for a future World Science Fiction convention.  This year, the vote will be between Kansas City and Shanghai.  I’m certain that I’ll be voting for Kansas City.  I’d LOVE to see the Great Wall, but I’ve seen pictures of the air in China lately, and my instincts suggest I may not want to take the health risks associated with a visit.  I’ve read that some of China’s elite are leaving for health reasons.



Conscience Creep: How “Religious Freedom” Spiraled Out of Control

by Valerie Tarico

Secular Americans and many liberal people of faith have been horrified by the Right’s most recent ploy: “religious freedom” claims that would give conservative business owners license to discriminate. Until Arizona made the national spotlight, the need for lunch counter sit-ins had seemed like a thing of the past. But in reality, advocates for religious privileges have been circling toward this point for some time.



Scientists Create Genetically Modified Cells That Protect Against HIV

by George Dvorsky

The treatment is considered radical, and the results were drawn from a small scale human trial, but for the first time in medical history, researchers have boosted their patients’ ability to fight HIV by replacing some of their natural immune cells with genetically modified versions.



Ethical Arguments for the Use of Cognitive Enhancing Drugs (Part Two)

by J. Hughes

There are four ethical arguments I want to bring to bear on behalf of cognitive enhancing drugs, roughly in order of their historical provenance.



Confluence: The Connected Human

by Tery Spataro

My past finally catches up to my future self. I’ve been around the collection, gathering, analysis and usage of data since 1986. In 1999, I was invited to the SIME conference in Stockholm.  It was an impressive event that provided simulating and thought-provoking ideas about new technologies.  At that time, these technologies were Bluetooth, wireless and smart phones…



Are We Obligated to Make Ourselves More Moral and Intelligent? (Part One)

by J. Hughes

Most of the ethical discussion of the use of stimulant drugs without a prescription in education has been negative, associating their use with performance enhancement in sports and with drug abuse. But the use of stimulants as study drugs actually has few side effects, and is almost entirely applied to the student’s primary obligation, academic performance. In this essay I consider some objections to off-label stimulant use, and to stimulant therapy for ADD, and argue that there are ethical arguments for the use of stimulants, and for future cognitively and morally enhancing therapies, in education, the work place, and daily life.



Taxonomy of Technological Unemployment Solutions (and Defeaters)

by Jon Perry

This article represents my latest attempt to categorize the possible solutions to technological unemployment. It’s largely based on episode 14 of my Review the Future Podcast so for a more detailed treatment of this topic, you can listen here.



How To Survive The Pre-Singularity Era: Part II: Time Is Muscle

by Christine Gaspar

It can be said that practitioners of emergency medicine have their own unique language. As a member of this subset of healthcare, I can unequivocally agree that we have invented pseudonyms, algorithms, protocols, expressions and even our unique brand of humour to give expression to what we do every day. Codes come in various colours- blue, black, white, yellow, orange… in order to succinctly convey an emergency in a manner that is efficient, and somewhat covert from the unsuspecting public.



A Fundamental Challenge

by Brenda Cooper

There are colossal challenges that have no specific home but affect every place.  Air is one of them, and frankly most of climate change comes down to managing the air badly. What do we need second only to air? What lives everywhere and takes multiple forms?



Mind-to-mind thought talking possible by 2030, scientist says

by Dick Pelletier

Today we enjoy basic conversations with our smart phone, desktop PC, games console, TV and soon, our car; but voice recognition, many believe, should not be viewed as an endgame technology. Although directing electronics with voice and gestures may be considered state-of-the-art today, we will soon be controlling entertainment and communications equipment not by talking or waving; but just by thinking!



Three-Parent Babies Are an Ethical Choice

by Arthur Caplan

The FDA is considering approving an experiment to repair a genetic disease in humans by creating embryos with DNA from three parents. Genes would be transferred from a healthy human egg to one that has a disease and the “repaired” egg then fertilized in the hope that a healthy baby will result. The goal of the experiment in genetic engineering is not a perfect baby but a healthy baby.



Capitalism, Free Enterprise And Progress: Partners Or Adversaries?

by Darian Worden

The Industrial Revolution is typically regarded as a story of capitalism, free enterprise, and progress in technology and living standards. This paper attempts to disentangle the threads of capitalism, free enterprise, and progress, in the context of the Industrial Revolution, with a focus on Britain and the United States. It aims to bring some historical perspectives into the current discourse.



Today’s Apps Are Turning Us Into Sociopaths

by Evan Selinger

While I am far from a Luddite who fetishizes a life without tech, we need to consider the consequences of this latest batch of apps and tools that remind us to contact significant others, boost our willpower,provide us with moral guidance, and encourage us to be civil. Taken together, we’re observing the emergence of tech that doesn’t just augment our intellect and lives — but is now beginning to automate and outsource our humanity.

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