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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Overview of technopolitics


whats new at ieet

On the use and misuse of 1984 in the reign of Trump

Andrew Ferguson on Predictive Policing

Value Conflicts surrounding the Meaning of Life in the Trans/Post/Human Future

Will AI make us immortal?

Trump’s Lying Reveals That He Is Empty Inside

This Country Is Leading The Robot Revolution


ieet books

Chasing Shadows: Visions of Our Coming Transparent World
Author
David Brin





JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life


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Workers and Automata:  A Sociological Analysis of the Italian Case


Riccardo Campa

Vol. 24 Issue 1 Mar, 2014

Link to article

The aim of this investigation is to determine if there is a relation between automation and unemployment within the Italian socio-economic system. Italy is Europe’s second nation and the fourth in the world in terms of robot density, and among the G7 it is the nation with the highest rate of youth unemployment. Establishing the ultimate causes of unemployment is a very difficult task, and the notion itself of ‘technological unemployment’ is controversial. Mainstream economics tends to relate the high rate of unemployment that characterises Italian society with the low flexibility of the labour market and the high cost of manpower. Little attention is paid to the impact of artificial intelligence on the level of employment. With reference to statistical data, we will try to show that automation can be seen at least as a contributory cause of unemployment. In addition, we will argue that both Luddism and anti-Luddism are two faces of the same coin. In both cases attention is focused on technology itself (the means of production) instead of on the system (the mode of production). Banning robots or denying the problems of robotisation are not effective solutions. A better approach would consist in combining growing automation with a more rational redistribution of income.


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