Support the IEET




The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States. Please give as you are able, and help support our work for a brighter future.



Search the IEET
Subscribe and Contribute to:


Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view




whats new at ieet

Last Things: Cold Comfort in the Far Future

What is the Future of the Sharing Economy?

Don’t Diss Dystopias: Sci-fi’s warning tales are as important as its optimistic stories.

And The Least Peaceful Places On Earth Are… | Global Peace Index 2014

Supertasking and Mindfulness

Will Brain Wave Technology Eliminate the Need for a Second Language?


ieet books

A Taxonomy and Metaphysics of Mind-Uploading
Author
Keith Wiley


comments

hankpellissier on 'Supertasking and Mindfulness' (Sep 30, 2014)

bubble13 on 'How Do You Filter Content in an Age of Abundance?' (Sep 29, 2014)

Dick Burkhart on 'The Obvious Relationship Between Climate and Family Planning—and Why We Don’t Talk About' (Sep 29, 2014)

instamatic on 'Dawkins and the "We are going to die" -Argument' (Sep 29, 2014)

Taiwanlight on 'Dawkins and the "We are going to die" -Argument' (Sep 27, 2014)

Farrah Greyson on 'Are Technological Unemployment and a Basic Income Guarantee Inevitable or Desirable?' (Sep 27, 2014)

instamatic on 'Dawkins and the "We are going to die" -Argument' (Sep 26, 2014)







Subscribe to IEET News Lists

Daily News Feed

Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List



JET

Transhumanism and Marxism: Philosophical Connections

Sex Work, Technological Unemployment and the Basic Income Guarantee

Technological Unemployment but Still a Lot of Work…

Hottest Articles of the Last Month


Why and How Should We Build a Basic Income for Every Citizen?
Sep 16, 2014
(14650) Hits
(7) Comments

MMR Vaccines and Autism: Bringing clarity to the CDC Whistleblower Story
Sep 14, 2014
(5347) Hits
(1) Comments

An open source future for synthetic biology
Sep 9, 2014
(5091) Hits
(0) Comments

Steven Pinker’s Guide to Classic Style
Sep 11, 2014
(4144) Hits
(0) Comments



IEET > Rights > Personhood > Life > Innovation > Vision > Technoprogressivism > Contributors > Kevin LaGrandeur

Print Email permalink (0) Comments (4471) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


The Persistent Peril of the Artificial Slave


Kevin LaGrandeur
By Kevin LaGrandeur
Academia.edu

Posted: Oct 16, 2012

Robots were created to perform the same jobs as slaves—jobs that are dirty, dangerous, or monotonous—thereby freeing their owners to pursue more lofty and comfortable pursuits.

In fact, as Timothy Lenoir notes, the whole field of cybernetics, which includes not just robots but also computer-based Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems, cyborgs, and androids, “was envisioned by scientists and engineers such as Norbert Wiener, Warren McCulloch, and their colleagues at the Macy Conferences [in the 1950s] as a way to maximize human potential in a chaotic and unpredictable postwar world. They wanted to ensure a position of mastery and control removed from the noise and chaos.”

Yet mastery and control are tenuous things. A New York Times article dated 23 May 2009 and entitled “The Coming Superbrain” discusses the dream, or nightmare, of true Artificial Intelligence. No longer the realm of  science fiction, the notion that the servant-systems that we have devised, the increasingly interconnected computer and communications networks, might  spontaneously emerge as self-organizing, self-replicating, and perhaps self- aware appears to be giving Silicon Valley scientists and technology experts conflicting fits of paranoia and joy—depending on their optimism about the controllability of such servant networks. These theorists focus primarily on “strong AI” systems—systems designed to evolve and learn on their own—and believe that they will, once sufficiently developed, evolve at such an exponential rate they will eventually learn to self-replicate and to surpass humans in  intelligence and capability.

The pessimists who worry about the controllability of such systems are numerous, perhaps because so much of the cutting-edge work in AI is funded by the military; and in fact, any truly intelligent artificial servant is most likely to arise from the search for automated weaponry. P.W. Singer points out that  not only is the military the source of most of the money for AI research, but it  has the strong investment motive of the recent wars in the Middle East as well as the most extensive integrative capacity for such research, having already established a network of defense research contractors. Armin Krishnan, in his book about military robotics, concurs with Singer, explaining the dilemma behind this situation:

To Read the Rest of the Essay, with Notes and References CLICK HERE


IEET Fellow Kevin LaGrandeur is a Faculty Member at the New York Institute of Technology. He specializes in the areas of technology and culture, digital culture, philosophy and literature.
Print Email permalink (0) Comments (4472) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


COMMENTS


YOUR COMMENT (IEET's comment policy)

Login or Register to post a comment.

Next entry: Using Neurotechnologies to Develop Virtues - A Buddhist Approach to Cognitive Enhancement (Part 1)

Previous entry: How To Make a Spy Exhibit Boring

HOME | ABOUT | FELLOWS | STAFF | EVENTS | SUPPORT  | CONTACT US
SECURING THE FUTURE | LONGER HEALTHIER LIFE | RIGHTS OF THE PERSON | ENVISIONING THE FUTURE
CYBORG BUDDHA PROJECT | AFRICAN FUTURES PROJECT | JOURNAL OF EVOLUTION AND TECHNOLOGY

RSSIEET Blog | email list | newsletter |
The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States.

Contact: Executive Director, Dr. James J. Hughes,
56 Daleville School Rd., Willington CT 06279 USA 
Email: director @ ieet.org     phone: 860-297-2376