Support the IEET




The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States. Please give as you are able, and help support our work for a brighter future.



Search the IEET
Subscribe and Contribute to:


Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view




whats new at ieet

Innovation Ecosystems in Emerging Economies

A Viral New World Disorder

Combatting Ebola: Moving beyond the hype

Procedural Due Process and the Dangers of Predictive Analytics

The Future of Robotic Automated Labor

Consciousness and Neuroscience


ieet books

Virtually Human: The Promise—-and the Peril—-of Digital Immortality
Author
Martine Rothblatt


comments

Kris Notaro on 'A Viral New World Disorder' (Oct 25, 2014)

Kris Notaro on 'The Future of Robotic Automated Labor' (Oct 25, 2014)

instamatic on 'Why “Why Transhumanism Won’t Work” Won’t Work' (Oct 24, 2014)

Abolitionist on 'Is using nano silver to treat Ebola misguided?' (Oct 24, 2014)

cacarr on 'Book review: Nick Bostrom's "Superintelligence"' (Oct 24, 2014)

jasoncstone on 'Ray Kurzweil, Google's Director Of Engineering, Wants To Bring The Dead Back To Life' (Oct 22, 2014)

pacificmaelstrom on 'Why “Why Transhumanism Won’t Work” Won’t Work' (Oct 21, 2014)







Subscribe to IEET News Lists

Daily News Feed

Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List



JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life

Hottest Articles of the Last Month


Google’s Cold Betrayal of the Internet
Oct 10, 2014
(7588) Hits
(2) Comments

Should we abolish work?
Oct 3, 2014
(5216) Hits
(1) Comments

The Future As History
Oct 12, 2014
(4518) Hits
(0) Comments

Transhumanism and Politics
Oct 7, 2014
(4427) Hits
(0) Comments



IEET > Security > Eco-gov > Rights > Personhood > Staff > Mike Treder

Print Email permalink (0) Comments (5250) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


LORCs of High Coolness


Mike Treder
By Mike Treder
Ethical Technology

Posted: Sep 27, 2009

In this week’s episode of LORCs (Links Of Required Clicking), we’re going to focus on items with a very high coolness quotient.


We’ll start with a fascinating report from the BBC about synaesthesia. This link says:

Imagine if you could see time laid out in front of you, or surrounding your body. And you could physically point to specific dates in space.

Important dates might stand out: birthdays, anniversaries. And you could scan a visible timeline—to check if you were available—whenever you made plans. No actual diary necessary.

According to Julia Simner, a psychologist from the University of Edinburgh, there is a reasonable chance you can. And that you may use the experience, unconsciously, every day.

Dr Simner studies synaesthesia—a condition caused by an unusually high number of connections between two areas of the brain’s sensory cortex, making two senses inseparable.

Synaesthetes, as they are known, have experiences that might seem extremely strange to any non-synaesthete. . .

Cool stuff. Must click.


Apropos to comments we often make here about the reality and urgency of global warming—and its evil stepchild, climate chaos—this link provides “Stunning Views of Glaciers From Space.” Really amazing, gorgeous, and, if you know what you’re looking at, quite tragic.

Glacier systems are extremely responsive to changes in surface temperature. We can literally see how quickly they are receding in numerous places around the Earth. Sadly, millions of people depend on annual glacier melt for much of their drinking and agricultural water; as the glaciers melt away, those people will have to go elsewhere to find water, likely leading to catastrophic numbers of environmental refugees.


Apropos to our much-discussed recent article about the possibilities for—and ethical concerns about—cloning Neanderthals, this link tells about new research on the DNA of moderns humans and how it compares to Neanderthal DNA:

Homo neanderthalensis nearly made it through two Ice Ages in Europe, only to disappear roughly 30,000 years ago. That’s about 15,000 years after our own ancestors arrived and settled the continent. For most of our own species’ time on Earth, Neanderthals were around, too. Some people even suspect that our own ancestors did them in.

Many wonder if there was interbreeding. Might some of us have a few distinctly Neanderthal genes?

To make genetic comparisons with modern humans, researchers previously mapped the genome of the chimpanzee, the living species to which we are most closely related. . .

Neanderthals and humans are believed to have first evolved separately from a common ancestor a few hundred thousand years ago. There are many fewer genetic and physical differences between the two hominids than there are between modern humans and chimpanzees. DNA sequences that have changed in humans—but that are the same in chimps and Neanderthals—might more easily be linked to their physical or behavioral manifestations and provide clues to the most recently evolved human traits.

So, maybe those extinct Neanderthals are not really our cousins, but our brothers and sisters!


Apropos to nothing in particular—but just supremely beautiful—is this link to a spectacular image of the Karymsky Volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia.

Wow. Super cool. Look at the subsided land surrounding the lava spread, and also check out the crater lake behind the volcano. Amazing.


Finally, here is a bonus LORC video, one that reaches into the stratosphere of coolness—or, you might say, well beyond the stratosphere and all the way out to Mars!

This is a computerized compilation of images from the Mars Spirit rover and HiRISE DEM flyovers. What a trip.


Mike Treder is a former Managing Director of the IEET.
Print Email permalink (0) Comments (5251) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


COMMENTS


YOUR COMMENT (IEET's comment policy)

Login or Register to post a comment.

Next entry: Future Of Growing Older

Previous entry: Promoting Principles, Not Predictions

HOME | ABOUT | FELLOWS | STAFF | EVENTS | SUPPORT  | CONTACT US
SECURING THE FUTURE | LONGER HEALTHIER LIFE | RIGHTS OF THE PERSON | ENVISIONING THE FUTURE
CYBORG BUDDHA PROJECT | AFRICAN FUTURES PROJECT | JOURNAL OF EVOLUTION AND TECHNOLOGY

RSSIEET Blog | email list | newsletter |
The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States.

Contact: Executive Director, Dr. James J. Hughes,
56 Daleville School Rd., Willington CT 06279 USA 
Email: director @ ieet.org     phone: 860-297-2376