IEET African Futures Project

African Futures Project Initiatives




African Futures Project News


Can Technology Help Save Africa?

Religion that causes violence

Aid Organizations Working in Ebola Regions (Aug 17th)

No, American Doctors, You Don’t Need Tyvek In Case of Ebola

The British should speak out against UK witch hunts by African Pentecostalists

While the world watches Ebola, Meningitis continues to kill in West Africa

Witch hunts, Misogyny and the Imperative of Enlightenment in Black Communities


African Futures Project Events





African Futures Resources


The IEET’s African Futures Project was started in 2012 as a multifaceted program to develop our understanding of how emerging technologies, combined with human rights and democratic empowerment, are transforming Africa, the poorest region of the world.

The project started with two separate initiatives, the first an accumulation of the intellectual thoughts and dreams of academic scholars and policy leaders, and the second a program aimed to empower ordinary Africans by putting communication devices in their hands.

In 2013, the IEET is relaunching the African Futures Project, and building on these established initiatives to support a revisioned mission for the project that focuses on the former goal of sustainable development for Africa.

Therefore, the new mission of the IEET’s African Futures Project is to work to promote and distribute products, and partner with other scholars and organizations under the common goal of discussing, developing, and delivering sustainable technological advancements to Africa.

The IEET will start towards this mission by expanding the two current projects, Fone4U and the African Futures Essay Collective. For more information on these projects, please click on the links in your left-hand side bar. In the future of the project, other initiatives will be developed to assist in fully realizing the goals and mission of the African Futures Project.

It is also our goal is to use this website to not only collect videos and articles that relate to the project, but to also offer full transparency in the progress with our initiatives.

For more information on the project, or if you would like to submit articles or get involved with the African Futures Project, please email Kris at Kris@ieet.org.



Sep 25, 2014

Can Technology Help Save Africa?

by R. Dennis Hansen

Ray Kurzweil recently made the observation that:  “A kid in Africa has access to more information than the President of the United States did 15 years ago.”[1]  Since I try to spend at least one month a year in Africa (mostly in Uganda), this quote got me thinking.


Sep 12, 2014

Religion that causes violence

by Leo Igwe

For sometime now, humanists have preoccupied themselves with what I call the 'debate of the mind'. Atheists and skeptics have articulated excellent, awakening, enlightening and ground breaking ideas, debating the existence of god, debunking miracles, and questioning dogmas. Humanists have written best selling books. And indeed, some non theists have best selling ideas. But there is a tendency for humanists to focus so much on the debate of the mind or to be contented with the victories they have recorded, forgetting that the debate of the mind is not the entire debate, forgetting that there is another important debate. That is the debate of the heart.


Sep 12, 2014

Aid Organizations Working in Ebola Regions (Aug 17th)

by Kelly Hills

Last night, Ian Mackay posted this very disturbing logistics/supply chain chart, showing that some personal protective equipment stock in countries battling Ebola are at “zero” – and have been for a while. Articles from the and New York Times bleakly illustrate just how bad the situation has become.


Sep 12, 2014

No, American Doctors, You Don’t Need Tyvek In Case of Ebola

by Kelly Hills

One of the more interesting aspects of the constant media coverage of the latest Ebola outbreak has been watching how developed nations like the United States, Britain, and Canada assume that the entire world is Just Like Them. The Seattle Times had a charming example of this yesterday, with American doctors questioning the CDC guidelines for how to care for an Ebola patient in America. An example of the ignorance on display comes from Tulsa, Oklahoma emergency physician Justin Fairless, who says that health care workers in West African nations…


Sep 10, 2014

The British should speak out against UK witch hunts by African Pentecostalists

by Leo Igwe

Nigeria’s notorious witch hunter, Helen Ukpabio, is suing for libel both the British Humanist Association (BHA) and the Witchcraft and Human Rights Information Network(WHRIN). In this she is, as in other matters, a repeat offender. All British campaigners for children’s rights, and especially humanists and secularists will not stand for the spread of African Pentacostalist witch hunts to the UK.


Aug 26, 2014

While the world watches Ebola, Meningitis continues to kill in West Africa

by Andrew Maynard

“This year alone, there have been 17,000 cases of meningitis in Nigeria, with nearly 1,000 deaths”. It’s a statement that jumped out at me watching a video from this summer’s Aspen Ideas Festival by my former University of Michigan Public Health student Utibe Effiong.


Aug 25, 2014

Witch hunts, Misogyny and the Imperative of Enlightenment in Black Communities

by Leo Igwe

If one hates a woman and wants to get rid of her; if a person dislikes particularly an elderly female member of the family and wants to destroy her socially, one of the most effective ways of getting rid of her is accusing her of witchcraft. This is the case in Northern Ghana as in other parts of the African continent.


Aug 7, 2014

Tom Friedman, Globalization’s Man in Madagascar

by Richard Eskow

Thomas Friedman recently filed an editorial from, and about, Madagascar. In a new piece for Salon, we point out the flaws in his thinking – flaws that mirror his shortsighted and trend-infatuated view of the domestic economy. 


Aug 7, 2014

Witchcraft, Mass Hysteria and Uncanny Behavior in Namibia

by Leo Igwe

Is strange behavior due to witchcraft or is it a natural occurrence? Is uncanny attitude a diseased manifestation that can be processed through prayers or an occurrence that can be explained without reference to magic and mysticism? British historian, Ronald Hutton, identified uncanniness as one the characteristics of witchcraft that cuts across all cultures. Witchcraft is an uncanny craft. Witches exhibit strange behavior in course of their occult operations. They employ means that are beyond the ordinary, the normal and the natural to cause misfortune and injury. In Namibia, ‘‘uncanny behavior’’ in a school is causing confusion and fueling accusations of witchcraft. Parents are panicking and are asking the authorities to close down the school.


Jul 30, 2014

Boko Haram and the Threat of Islamic Extremism in Africa

by Leo Igwe

Today, there is a growing threat of religious fundamentalism in many parts of the globe. Worldly organisations driven by otherworldly agenda are on a rampage-waging ‘holy wars’, killing, maiming, kidnapping, raping in furtherance of their destructive and divine vision of this world. The forces of dark age are trying to push back the tide of enlightenment and intellectual awakening on many fronts.


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