IEET African Futures Project
Purpose of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

African Futures Project Initiatives




African Futures Project News


A Fleet of Jets: A Critical Look at the Business of African Pentecostalism

Is the Ethiopian Village of Awra Amba Really a Utopia?

Nigerians will soon have to worry about implanted pacemaker security

Top 10 Emerging Tech: an African Perspective. Genetic Engineering, Additive Manufacturing, AI

More Swing Sets for Africa

Fighting malaria is going to take more than just nets

The Media was Right… Bad Luck Causes Most Cancers in Nigeria!


African Futures Project Events





African Futures Resources


The IEET’s African Futures Project was started in 2012 as a multifaceted program to develop our understanding of how emerging technologies, combined with human rights and democratic empowerment, are transforming Africa, the poorest region of the world.

The project started with two separate initiatives, the first an accumulation of the intellectual thoughts and dreams of academic scholars and policy leaders, and the second a program aimed to empower ordinary Africans by putting communication devices in their hands.

In 2013, the IEET is relaunching the African Futures Project, and building on these established initiatives to support a revisioned mission for the project that focuses on the former goal of sustainable development for Africa.

Therefore, the new mission of the IEET’s African Futures Project is to work to promote and distribute products, and partner with other scholars and organizations under the common goal of discussing, developing, and delivering sustainable technological advancements to Africa.

The IEET will start towards this mission by expanding the two current projects, Fone4U and the African Futures Essay Collective. For more information on these projects, please click on the links in your left-hand side bar. In the future of the project, other initiatives will be developed to assist in fully realizing the goals and mission of the African Futures Project.

It is also our goal is to use this website to not only collect videos and articles that relate to the project, but to also offer full transparency in the progress with our initiatives.

For more information on the project, or if you would like to submit articles or get involved with the African Futures Project, please email Kris at Kris@ieet.org.



Mar 31, 2015

A Fleet of Jets: A Critical Look at the Business of African Pentecostalism

by Leo Igwe

Anybody who thinks that the wave of christianity based witch hunting and pentecostalism sweeping across Africa and migrant communities is due to some unique strand of piety and religiosity of Africans should think again. The rise of African pentecostalism has a lot to do with the 'business acumen' of the region's 'pastorpreneurs' who are exploiting the situation in the region. 


Mar 30, 2015

Is the Ethiopian Village of Awra Amba Really a Utopia?

by R. Dennis Hansen

My Ethiopian guide had mentioned a possible visit to the village of Awra Amba.  I had never heard of the place, so I looked it up on the Internet.  When I learned that it was a “utopian” community in northern Ethiopia, I decided I to pay a visit.  I had previously traveled to a similar “utopian” enterprise–Gaviotas–in Colombia in 2010.


Mar 24, 2015

Nigerians will soon have to worry about implanted pacemaker security

by Utibe Effiong

When Reuters announced the successful deployment of the first Internet-enabled pacemaker in the United States, it was a dream come true for many. The news came late in the summer of 2009, three weeks after Carol Kasyjanski became the first American recipient of a wireless pacemaker that allowed her doctor to monitor her health from afar. Since then there has been a proliferation of Internet-connected personal medical devices, or iPMDs, which now include insulin pumps, glucometers, blood pressure cuffs, pulse oximeters, walking canes, and of course, the ubiquitous fitness wearables.


Mar 18, 2015

Top 10 Emerging Tech: an African Perspective. Genetic Engineering, Additive Manufacturing, AI

by Utibe Effiong

What do emerging technologies mean for a developing economy like Nigeria?  This is the second article in a series where I focus on the World Economic Forum’s list of the most promising emerging technologies for the year 2015. Here, I examine the implications of technological breakthroughs such as precise genetic engineering, additive manufacturing, and artificial intelligence, in developing economies such as Nigeria.


Mar 5, 2015

More Swing Sets for Africa

by R. Dennis Hansen

On a recent trip (Jan/Feb 2015) to Uganda and Ethiopia, we installed 3 new swing sets, finished a wooden one that partially completed, and made a few repairs to several existing swings.  I love installing swing sets around the world.  It’s fun overcoming the logistical problems, and it’s great to see the kids having a fun time swinging back and forth.


Feb 12, 2015

Fighting malaria is going to take more than just nets

by Utibe Effiong

In January, the New York Times highlighted how insecticide treated nets meant to protect people from mosquitoes and malaria are now being used to haul fish in Africa. Among those using these nets to catch fish, hunger today is a bigger risk than malaria tomorrow.


Jan 28, 2015

The Media was Right… Bad Luck Causes Most Cancers in Nigeria!

by Utibe Effiong

The recent study in the journal Science, which suggested that most cancers are due to bad luck rather than lifestyle or environmental factors, generated massive media ripples. To summarize, authors Tomasetti and Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins University say the “majority [of cancers] are due to “bad luck,” that is, random mutations arising during DNA replication in normal, noncancerous stem cells”.


Jan 14, 2015

Boko Haram and the Politics of Fighting Jihadists in Nigeria

by Leo Igwe

As world leaders gathered at the French capital to march in solidarity with France following a brutal attack on its citizens by terrorists, something far more atrocious and horrifying in scale and severity unfolded in north-east Nigeria. Boko Haram militants massacred over 2000 persons, mainly women, children and elderly people.


Nov 26, 2014

South Sudanese Refugees Flood into Northwestern Uganda

by R. Dennis Hansen

This year (2014) alone, it is estimated that over 150,000 South Sudanese refugees will flood south into northwestern Uganda (the area around Arua).  This is the result of the fierce tribal and ethnic warfare going on in South Sudan.  Analyses of arrival profiles show that women and children continue to represent the vast majority of the new arrivals.


Nov 9, 2014

Crowd-sourcing African Technology Projects

by R. Dennis Hansen

“Approaches to reducing [global] suffering have traditionally been political or communitarian in nature.  However, something has been changing in recent decades; technological development has been accelerating making new approaches to old problems possible.”  This is particularly true when it comes to education and training in areas like Africa.


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