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Rights > HealthLongevity > CognitiveLiberty > FreeThought > Personhood > Vision > Bioculture > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher > Technoprogressivism > Innovation > Disability > Enablement
John Danaher
On the Need for Epistemic Enhancement by John Danaher

Democratic Legitimacy and the Enhancement ProjectKlaming and Vedder (2010) have argued that enhancement technologies that improve the epistemic efficiency of the legal system (“epistemic enhancements”) would benefit the common good. But there are two flaws to Klaming and Vedder’s argument. First, they rely on an under-theorised and under-specified conception of the common good. When theory and specification are supplied, their CGJ for enhancing eyewitness memory and recall becomes significantly less persuasive. And second, altho...

Rights > HealthLongevity > Personhood > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Vision > FreeThought > Futurism > Technoprogressivism > Innovation > Biosecurity > Eco-gov
Peter Ellyard - Rapid Prototying the Future Adam Ford

What will the future of sustainability look like? What kind of technologies might be used in the future economy to exploit the ecosystem or to actually create sustainability? How will workers be affected? How will democracy evolve?

 

Directors > George Dvorsky > HealthLongevity > Enablement > Innovation > Implants
George Dvorsky
Scientists Enhance Intelligence of Mice with Human Brain Cells by George Dvorsky

It’s not quite Rise of the Planet of the Apes, but it may not be too far off, either. By grafting human glial cells into the brains of mice, neuroscientists were able to “sharply enhance” their cognitive capacities. These improvements included augmentations to memory, learning, and adaptive conditioning. It’s a breakthrough that could yield important insights into the treatment of human brain disorders.

Rights > HealthLongevity > Fellows > Russell Blackford > FreeThought
Russell Blackford
Sex in Samoa – Margaret Mead not so wrong after all? by Russell Blackford

In her famous 1928 book, Coming of Age in Samoa, Margaret Mead notoriously wrote about an island paradise in the Pacific with much more carefree attitudes to pre-marital sex than existed in Western countries at the time, and she was apparently motivated, at least to an extent, by something of an ideology of free love. She believed that a relaxation of sexual restrictions in her own society would have utilitarian benefits, that the restrictions did more harm than good.

GlobalDemocracySecurity > Vision > Bioculture > Contributors > Massimo Pigliucci > HealthLongevity > Innovation > Biosecurity > Resilience
Massimo Pigliucci
Is cultural evolution a Darwinian process? by Massimo Pigliucci

The “Darwinian” theory of evolution is here to stay. I used the scare quotes to refer to it in the previous sentence because the current incarnation, known as the Modern Synthesis (and incorrectly referred to as “neo-Darwinism,” which actually was an even earlier version) is significantly more sophisticated and encompassing than the original insight by Darwin. Indeed, my opinion — which is certainly not universally shared — is that evolutionary biology is currently undergoing another gradual but significan...

HealthLongevity > Enablement > Innovation
Few IEETers Quantify the Self

Although the quantified self movement has been getting a lot of attention within technoprogressive and transhumanist communities, appealing to the self-engineering mindset, not many IEET community members have started quantifying themselves. Two thirds either measure nothing about themselves, or only watch their weight. Only one in eight are using mobile health devices or apps to record facts about their bodies or minds.

Rights > HealthLongevity > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Vision > Contributors > Rick Searle
Rick Searle
Immortal Jellyfish and the Collapse of Civilization by Rick Searle

The one rule that seems to hold for everything in our Universe is that all that exists, after a time, must pass away, which for life forms means they will die. From there, however, the bets are off and the definition of the word “time” in the phrase “after a time” comes into play. The Universe itself may exist for as long as 100s of trillions of years to at last disappear into the formless quantum field from whence it came. Galaxies, or more specifically, clusters of galaxies and super-galaxies, may survive for perhaps trillions of y...

Rights > HealthLongevity > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Vision > Futurism
Future Day: The Future of Work Adam Ford

What sort of future do you want? Future Day is a celebration of imaginative and rational thinking about the future where you can participate. “Future Day is designed to center the impossible in the public mind once a year as a temptation too delicious to resist.”—Howard Bloom, Author and Publicist

You can use Future Day to harness energy, and help spread the importance of future thinking to a wider audience. Much like Earth Day has. Today with Earth Day there are campaigns to turn off lights, to be more aware of ene...

Vision > HealthLongevity
Future Day: Singularity University Adam Ford

What sort of future do you want? Future Day is a celebration of imaginative and rational thinking about the future where you can participate. “Future Day is designed to center the impossible in the public mind once a year as a temptation too delicious to resist.”—Howard Bloom, Author and Publicist

Rights > HealthLongevity > Economic > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Vision > Contributors > Piero Scaruffi > FreeThought > PrivacySurveillance > Military
piero scaruffi
The War on Drugs: What’s the Point? by piero scaruffi

The moment one argues in favor of liberalizing drugs people accuse him of being a drug addict: i have not drugs, do not do drugs and do not intend to do drugs. I care for my brain. Just like i do not smoke because i care for my lungs and i do not eat junk food because i care for my heart.