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Staff Topics
GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Eco-gov > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Urban sensors are for the fog of (climate) war by Marcelo Rinesi

Silicon Valley pitches for smart cities and military descriptions of future battle environments are awfully similar. That’s not entirely coincidental.

Rights > HealthLongevity > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
What’s the healthiest city in the US? (and what does that even mean?) by Marcelo Rinesi

(Spoiler alert: it’s not Detroit, and it’d be a relatively simple question if it weren’t for cancer.)

Technopolitics > Sociology > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Deep(ly) Unsettling: The ubiquitous, unspoken business model of AI-induced mental illness by Marcelo Rinesi

“The junk merchant,” wrote William S. Burroughs, “doesn’t sell his product to the consumer, he sells the consumer to his product. He does not improve and simplify his merchandise. He degrades and simplifies the client.” He might as well have been describing the commercial, AI-mediated, social-network-driven internet.

Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
When devops involves monitoring for excess suicides by Marcelo Rinesi

When it comes to ethics and AI, forget corporate responsibility statements. If you want to know what a tech company worries about, look at what it monitors when deploying new code.

Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Nanobots and the Teenage Brain by Marcelo Rinesi

Charlie had a chip in his head, but that’s not what made him special…

Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
The Voice of Things by Marcelo Rinesi

t looked to her like a Christmas miracle, but it was just the Internet of Things…

Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Soul in the Loop by Marcelo Rinesi

The Oxford Protocol requires all “killer robots” to be monitored by humans. But who monitors them?

Rights > BodyAutonomy > PostGender > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
What makes an algorithm feminist, and why we need them to be by Marcelo Rinesi

About one in nine engineers in the US is a woman, which makes some men infer from this that they are “naturally” bad at it. Many data-driven algorithms would conclude the same thing; that’s still the wrong conclusion, but, dangerously, it seems blessed by the impartiality of algorithms. Here’s how bias creeps in.

Rights > BodyAutonomy > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Logs from a haunted heart by Marcelo Rinesi

She’s scared all the time. But is her fear the reason why her heart suddenly speeds up a dozen times a day, shifting in a second from the dull ticking of dread into the accelerating staccato of runaway panic? The diagnostics in her peacemaker’s app say that everything is normal, but perhaps they can be faked by somebody with maintenance access to the device. She doesn’t have it, she’s only the patient.

Technopolitics > Sociology > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
There are only two emotions in Facebook, and we only use one at a time by Marcelo Rinesi

We have the possibility of infinite emotional nuance, but Facebook doesn’t seem to be the place for it. The data and psychology of how we react emotionally online are fascinating, but the social implications, although not specific to social networks, are rather worrisome.