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Symbols and their Consequences in the Sex Robot Debate | John Danaher
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Affiliate Scholar Topics
SciencePolicy > Safety and Efficacy > Artificial Intelligence > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
Why we should create artificial offspring: meaning and the collective afterlife Science and Engineering Ethics

The iCub Robot - Image courtesy of Jiuguang Wang

That’s the title of a new article I have coming out. It argues that the creation of artificial offspring could add meaning to our lives and that it might consequently be worth committing to the project of doing so. It’s going to be published in the journal Science and Engineering Ethics. The official version will be out in a few weeks. In the meantime, you can read the abstract below and download a pre-publication version at the links provided.

Technopolitics > SciencePolicy > Safety and Efficacy > Rights > HealthLongevity > Affiliate Scholar > Ilia Stambler
Ilia Stambler
Frequently Asked Questions on the Ethics of Lifespan and Healthspan Extension by Ilia Stambler

The mission of healthy life extension, or healthy longevity promotion, raises a broad variety of questions and tasks, relating to science and technology, individual and communal ethics, and public policy, especially health and science policy. Despite the wide variety, the related questions may be classified into three groups. The first group of questions concerns the feasibility of the accomplishment of life extension. Is it theoretically and technologically possible? What are our grounds for optimism? What are the means to ensure that the l...

Rights > Economic > Technological Unemployment > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Building a Postwork Utopia by John Danaher

I have a new paper. It appears as a chapter in the book Surviving the Machine Age, which is edited by Kevin LaGrandeur and James Hughes. The book is, I believe, unique in how it brings together several different perspectives on what should and will happen to society in an era of rampant technological unemployment. It’s a little bit pricy, but I would recommend it for purchase by university libraries and the like.

Technopolitics > Sociology > Rights > Political Empowerment & Participation > GlobalDemocracySecurity > GlobalGov > Affiliate Scholar > John G. Messerly
John G. Messerly
Comey’s Firing: Do We Live in a Kleptocracy? by John G. Messerly

Every time I sit down to write about something I want to write about—like how to find meaning in a secular age, or ponder the imminent birth of my new granddaughter—I find my reverie interrupted by the political turmoil surrounding me.

Technopolitics > Sociology > GlobalDemocracySecurity > GlobalGov > Affiliate Scholar > Rick Searle
Rick Searle
The lessons the left should (and shouldn’t) take from the victory of Macron by Rick Searle

In 2016 populism burst upon liberal democracies like a whirlwind. Yet, since Trump’s election in November of last year the storm appears to have passed. There was the defeat of the far right presidential candidate Norbert Hofer in Austria (of all places) in December of last year followed by the loss of the boldly pompadoured (which seems to be a thing now on the right) Geert Wilders in parliamentary elections in the Netherlands a few months back, followed by the seeming victory of the Kutcher faction over the Bannon faction in the Trump ad...

SciencePolicy > Innovation > Safety and Efficacy > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
The Ethics of Crash Optimisation Algorithms by John Danaher

Patrick Lin started it. In an article entitled ‘The Ethics of Autonomous Cars’ (published in The Atlantic in 2013), he considered the principles that self-driving cars should follow when they encountered tricky moral dilemmas on the road. We all encounter these situations from time to time. Something unexpected happens and you have to make a split second decision. A pedestrian steps onto the road and you don’t see him until the last minute: do you slam on the brakes or swerve to avoid? Lin made the obvious point that no matter how safe...

Rights > Economic > Technological Unemployment > Personhood > Affiliate Scholar > John G. Messerly
John G. Messerly
What Is The Point of Money? by John G. Messerly

Wealth is necessary in order to live well, but it is not sufficient. You may have lots of money but live terribly without friends or wisdom. You may have mistaken part of a good life—sufficient wealth to live—with the whole of the good life. For money isn’t an end in itself, it is merely a means to an end.

Technopolitics > Philosophy > SciencePolicy > Artificial Intelligence > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Robot Rights: Intelligent Machines (Panel Discussion) by John Danaher

I participated in a debate/panel discussion about robot rights at the Science Gallery (Trinity, Dublin) on the 29th March 2017. A video from the event is above. Here’s the description from the organisers:

Technopolitics > Philosophy > Rights > HealthLongevity > Personhood > Affiliate Scholar > Steve Fuller
Steve Fuller
A Modest Proposal for Suicide as a Facilitator of Transhumanism by Steve Fuller

Perhaps the most potent argument against suicide in modern secular societies is that it constitutes wastage of the agent’s own life and commits at the very least indirect harm to the lives of others who in various ways have depended on the agent. However, the force of this argument could be mitigated if the suicide occurred in the context of experimentation, including self-experimentation, with very risky treatments that aim to extend the human condition. Suicides in these cases could be quite informative and hence significantly advance th...

Technopolitics > Philosophy > Affiliate Scholar > John G. Messerly
John G. Messerly
Psychological Impediments to Good Thinking by John G. Messerly

“Nothing is so firmly believed as what we least know.” ~ Montaigne

Good reasoning is hard because we are largely non-rational and emotional beings.1 Here are some psychological impediments to good reasoning. Remember that I am not getting paid to share this information about cogent reasoning. I could make more money going on late night TV and peddling nonsense like so many others do. My goal is to educate.