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MULTIMEDIA: John Danaher Topics Podcast - Why we should create artificial offspring
The Ethics of Moral Enhancement
Bryson on Why Robots Should Be Slaves
Wellman and Rajan on the Ethics of Automated Trading
Mark Coeckelbergh on Robots and the Tragedy of Automation
Symbols and their Consequences in the Sex Robot Debate | John Danaher
Andrew Ferguson on Predictive Policing
Jonathan Pugh on Bio-Conservatism and Human Enhancement
Steve Fuller on Transhumanism and the Proactionary Imperative
Anders Sandberg on the Ethics of Time Compression in Computing
Aaron Wright on Blockchains and the Law
Laura Cabrera on Human Enhancement, Communication and Values
David Gunkel on Robots and Cyborgs
Rachel O’Dwyer on Bitcoin, Blockchains and the Digital Commons
Karen Levy on the Rise of Intimate Surveillance


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John Danaher Topics
Technopolitics > Philosophy > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
New papers on Moral Enhancement and Brain-Based Lie Detection by John Danaher

I have a couple of new papers available online. The first looks at the moral freedom objection to moral enhancement. The second tries to rebut an interesting philosophical objection to the use of brain-based lie detection. Both papers are set to appear in edited books in 2018. Details and links to pre-publication versions below (just click on the paper title):

Vision > Virtuality > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
The Reality of Virtual Reality: A Philosophical Analysis by John Danaher

There is an apple in front of me. I can see it, but I can’t touch it. The reason is that the apple is actually a 3-D rendered model of an apple. It looks like an apple, but exists only within a virtual environment — one that is projected onto the computer screen in front of me. I can interact with the apple. I have an avatar that I can control on the screen. That avatar is a virtual projection of my self. It can pick up the apple, throw it around the virtual room, or eat it. But I can’t touch it and interact with it using my own physic...

SciencePolicy > Brain–computer-interface > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
The Tell-Tale Brain: The Effect of Predictive Brain Implants on Autonomy by John Danaher

What if your brain could talk to you?

’That’s a silly question’, I hear you say, ‘My brain already talks to me.’

Technopolitics > Philosophy > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Can we derive meaning and value from virtual reality? An Analysis of the Postwork Future by John Danaher

Yuval Noah Harari wrote an article in the Guardian a couple of months back entitled ‘The meaning of life in a world without work’. I was intrigued. Harari has gained a great deal of notoriety for his books Sapiens and Homo Deus. They are ambitious books, both in scope and intent. Harari’s subject is nothing less than the entire history and future of humanity. He wants to show us where we have come from, how we got here, and where we are going. He writes in a sweeping, breathless and occasionally grandiose style. As you read, you can’...

SciencePolicy > Artificial Intelligence > Neuroscience > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Cognitive Scarcity and Artificial Intelligence: How Assistive AI Could Alleviate Inequality by John Danaher

By Miles Brundage (FHI, Oxford University) and John Danaher (NUI Galway)

(Be sure to check out Miles’s other work on his website and over at the Future of Humanity Institute, where he is currently a research fellow. You can also follow him on Twitter @Miles_Brundage)

Vision > Virtuality > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Can we derive meaning and value from virtual reality? An Analysis of the Postwork Future by John Danaher

Yuval Noah Harari wrote an article in the Guardian a couple of months back entitled ‘The meaning of life in a world without work’. I was intrigued. Harari has gained a great deal of notoriety for his books Sapiens and Homo Deus. They are ambitious books, both in scope and intent. Harari’s subject is nothing less than the entire history and future of humanity. He wants to show us where we have come from, how we got here, and where we are going. He writes in a sweeping, breathless and occasionally grandiose style. As you read, you can’...

SciencePolicy > Safety and Efficacy > Artificial Intelligence > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
Why we should create artificial offspring: meaning and the collective afterlife Science and Engineering Ethics

The iCub Robot - Image courtesy of Jiuguang Wang

That’s the title of a new article I have coming out. It argues that the creation of artificial offspring could add meaning to our lives and that it might consequently be worth committing to the project of doing so. It’s going to be published in the journal Science and Engineering Ethics. The official version will be out in a few weeks. In the meantime, you can read the abstract below and download a pre-publication version at the links provided.

Rights > Economic > Technological Unemployment > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Building a Postwork Utopia by John Danaher

I have a new paper. It appears as a chapter in the book Surviving the Machine Age, which is edited by Kevin LaGrandeur and James Hughes. The book is, I believe, unique in how it brings together several different perspectives on what should and will happen to society in an era of rampant technological unemployment. It’s a little bit pricy, but I would recommend it for purchase by university libraries and the like.

SciencePolicy > Innovation > Safety and Efficacy > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
The Ethics of Crash Optimisation Algorithms by John Danaher

Patrick Lin started it. In an article entitled ‘The Ethics of Autonomous Cars’ (published in The Atlantic in 2013), he considered the principles that self-driving cars should follow when they encountered tricky moral dilemmas on the road. We all encounter these situations from time to time. Something unexpected happens and you have to make a split second decision. A pedestrian steps onto the road and you don’t see him until the last minute: do you slam on the brakes or swerve to avoid? Lin made the obvious point that no matter how safe...

Technopolitics > Philosophy > SciencePolicy > Artificial Intelligence > Affiliate Scholar > John Danaher
John Danaher
Robot Rights: Intelligent Machines (Panel Discussion) by John Danaher

I participated in a debate/panel discussion about robot rights at the Science Gallery (Trinity, Dublin) on the 29th March 2017. A video from the event is above. Here’s the description from the organisers: