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MULTIMEDIA: Vision Topics How Astronomy Has Opened the Gates to Humanity’s Greatest Inventions
Einstein’s Persistence, Not Genius, Is the Reason We Know His Name
The Science of Productivity and Motivation
The Science of Bias, Empathy, and Dehumanization
Techno-Anxiety? We’ve Been Afraid of Disruptions Since the Printing Press
To solve old problems, study new species
Dr. James Hughes On Moral Enhancement Through Neurotech & Uploading The Mind To Computers
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Is Incomplete — There’s a Final, Forgotten Stage
The Science of Political Judgment and Empathy
The Science of Brain Health and Cognitive Decline
Blockchain Tech Can Redistribute Power and Erase Borders
Menu to Mars
Staring Into Space
How we explore unanswered questions in physics
Why Earth may someday look like Mars


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Vision Topics
Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The barista who could disarm nuclear bombs by Marcelo Rinesi

She didn’t know she could, not having seen one during the week the skillware was in her glasses’s software library. But the company that supplied Starbucks with barista-guiding software had military contracts for slightly different sorts of skill, and was not above their occasional misplacement.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The Green Gears by Marcelo Rinesi

Sometimes she pictured small computer screens inside each leaf, code scrolling through them like a bad movie’s idea of what hacking looks like.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Gold in the Blood by Marcelo Rinesi

Genetic engineering could buy athletic potential, not the willpower to train and win, or at least that’s what your father says every now and then. You think every generation wants to complain that things were harder for them than for the following ones, and mostly ignore him and everything else that’s not directly related to your training.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The Truth About Clones by Marcelo Rinesi

“Forget all the sci-fi you’ve watched. The fantasy of the evil clone is a form of the terror of the doppelganger, which is our fear of our own Shadow. A clone is just a younger identical twin.”

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Red Requiem by Marcelo Rinesi

The collapse of the first base on Mars was a harrowing one, sparked by a software error leading to the collapse of the oxygen futures market.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The Frankenstein Society by Marcelo Rinesi

You had thought them a laboratory legend, but now one of their agents was in yours, pointing a gun at you while another connected a laptop to the network holding the AI that was going to be your Turing Prize and IPO fortune.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Saints of the Scorched Earth by Marcelo Rinesi

Decades of algorithmic CEO headhunting inevitably led to the evaluation of potential religious charisma at a very early age.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The Sum of All Secrets by Marcelo Rinesi

The first AI superspy was a failure. The only dangers it found were what billionaires, politicians, and would-be terrorists said they wanted to do. On Twitter and the Washington Post. On Reddit and national television. On Facebook and to cheering crowds.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: Dream Job by Marcelo Rinesi

“I can’t sleep,” I complained to my therapist. The inhumanly empathetic rendering nodded.

Vision > Bioculture > Fiction > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Short story: The Recursive Grammar of Progress by Marcelo Rinesi

It wasn’t terrorism to install robots with machine guns in every schoolyard and street corner.