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MULTIMEDIA: GlobalDemocracySecurity Topics Gene editing in human embryos is a moral obligation, says John Harris
World Record Electric Helicopter 30 Minute Flight
Andrew Ferguson on Predictive Policing
This Country Is Leading The Robot Revolution
The Secret To Germany’s Powerful Economy
Trump To Keep One Obama Policy In Place
The ethical dilemma of designer babies
Where is cybercrime really coming from?
Andy Zee Talks RefuseFascism With John Iadarola On The Young Turks
MLK to BLM: The Internet and Civil Rights In 2017
Digital Culture: Learn the Language before You Dismiss It
U.S. & NATO Ramping Up W-A-R & Provoking Russia
Blockchain Tech Can Redistribute Power and Erase Borders
Anders Sandberg on the Ethics of Time Compression in Computing
Let’s clean up the space junk orbiting Earth


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GlobalDemocracySecurity Topics
Technopolitics > GlobalDemocracySecurity > GlobalGov > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
The politics of crime-fighting software by Marcelo Rinesi

Call it machine learning, Artificial Intelligence, or simply computational intelligence: countries are rushing to apply new technologies to combat crimes, but how they do so — and even what counts as crime — varies among them, and says much about their societies, priorities, and future.

Technopolitics > Sociology > Rights > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Affiliate Scholar > Tsvi Bisk
Tsvi Bisk
The Future of the European Union by Tsvi Bisk

The present crises of the EU (70 years after its creation) are in large part a consequence of absorbing three former fascist countries (Greece, Portugal and Spain) and eleven former communist countries, whose economies, standards of living and political cultures lagged behind the 13 more politically and economically advanced countries. The internal migrations towards a better standard of living from the 14 to the 13, in addition to the refugee crisis, have been major contributors to the dissatisfactions that led to Brexit as well as the rise...

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Cyber > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Cyber-weapons as a form of magic, and why we can’t code our way to a safer internet by Marcelo Rinesi

Mainstream language about cyber-security, specially at the political and military level, is divorced from reality to the point of nonsense.

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Eco-gov > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Urban sensors are for the fog of (climate) war by Marcelo Rinesi

Silicon Valley pitches for smart cities and military descriptions of future battle environments are awfully similar. That’s not entirely coincidental.

Rights > Economic > GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Cyber > Affiliate Scholar > Hank Pellissier
Hank Pellissier
What Transhumanists Lost by Investing Late in Bitcoin by Hank Pellissier

In 2012, a writer in Germany, Rüdiger Koch, wrote an intriguing essay for IEET.org, that was subtitled “Amazing things would happen if a large percentage of transhumanists were financially independent. How can this be done?”

Rights > Political Empowerment & Participation > GlobalDemocracySecurity > Affiliate Scholar > John G. Messerly
John G. Messerly
What if Mueller proves his case and it doesn’t matter? by John G. Messerly

Dave Roberts of Vox has just published what I believe is the most important article I’ve read recently about the crisis of American democracy: America is facing an epistemic crisis: What if Mueller proves his case and it doesn’t matter? Here’s a brief summary of the piece followed by a brief commentary

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Affiliate Scholar > John G. Messerly
John G. Messerly
Review of Phil Torres’ “Morality, Foresight & Human Flourishing by John G. Messerly

Phil Torres has just published an important new book: Morality, Foresight, and Human Flourishing: An Introduction to Existential Risks. Torres is the founding Director of the Project for Future Human Flourishing, which aims to both understand and mitigate, existential threats to humanity. Astronomer Royal of the United Kingdom Martin Rees writes the book’s foreword, where he states that it “draws attention to issues our civilization’s entire fate may depend on.” (13) We would do well to take this statement seriously—our lives may d...

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Biosecurity > Vision > Bioculture > Advisory Board > Brian Hanley
Brian Hanley
Biohacking humans is not wise – Josiah Zayner’s “The Odin” - on Buzzfeed by Brian Hanley

I was interviewed by phone before this SynBioBeta conference referenced in the Buzzfeed article, but they didn’t use what I said. I made it crystal clear I thought biohacking humans could be quite dangerous. I told them I stopped communicating technical information to unqualified people several years ago because I realized it encouraged people to do things they weren’t qualified to be involved with. I used some examples with the journalist.

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Military > Fellows > David Brin
David Brin
The likelihood of war by David Brin

While nature flails at us - from hurricanes and quakes to solar flares - we all know that we’re in far greater danger from ourselves. (And, of course, we humans are responsible for some of nature’s fury, too.)  So I feel compelled to use this soapbox yet again, drawing attention,  to the increasing likelihood of manmade hell, unleashed by an unbalanced leadership caste.

GlobalDemocracySecurity > CatRisks > Cyber > Staff > Marcelo Rinesi
Marcelo Rinesi
Tesla (or Google) and the risk of massively distributed physical terrorist attacks by Marcelo Rinesi

You know, an autonomous car is only a software vulnerability away from being a lethal autonomous weapon, and a successful autonomous car company is only a hack away from being the world’s largest (if single-use) urban combat force. Such an event would easily be the worst terrorist attack in history.