IEET > Affiliate Scholar > Ted Chu > Dick Pelletier
An Economist/Philosopher, a Journalist/Politician and a Futurist Enter the IEET Bar..
Jan 26, 2014  

To be fair, all three of the new Affiliate Scholars the IEET is welcoming this month are best described as “big thinkers,” with work that ranges from philosophy and religion to politics and science. Ted Chu is a professor of economics at NY Abu Dhabi and former chief economist for General Motors, Dick Pelletier is a very popular contributor here at the IEET, and Giuseppe Vatinno is a journalist who was the first openly transhumanist member of the Italian parliament.

Ted Chu is a professor of Economics at New York University in Abu Dhabi, and former chief economist for General Motors and the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority. Ted graduated from Fudan University in Shanghai, and earned his PhD in economics at Georgetown University.  He is the founder of the nonprofit CoBe (Cosmic Being) Institute in Michigan, a senior scholar at ChangCe, a Beijing-based independent think tank, and a former president of Greater Washington Professional Forum. He is the author of Human Purpose and Transhuman Potential: A Cosmic Vision for Our Future Evolution (2014).

Giuseppe Vatinno is a journalist in Rome and a former member of the Italian parliament. He trained as a physicist at the Sapienza University of Rome. In 2012 Giuseppe was the first openly transhumanist member of the Italian parliament. He is author of Transhumanism: a new philosophy for the twenty-first century man (2010), Political Ecology (2011), Nothing and Everything: The Wonders of the Possible (2012) and Aenigma: Symbol, Mystery and Mysticism (2013).

Dick Pelletier is a weekly columnist who writes about future science and technologies for numerous publications. He’s also appeared on various TV shows, and he blogs at Positive Futurist. He lives in Las Vegas, Nevada.




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