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Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view







ieet books

Virtually Human: The Promise—-and the Peril—-of Digital Immortality
Author
by Martine Rothblatt

A Taxonomy and Metaphysics of Mind-Uploading
by Keith Wiley

A History of Life-Extensionism in the Twentieth Century
by Ilia Stambler

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
by Nick Bostrom


ieet events

Brin on SETI @ AAPT
January 4 -5, 2015
San Diego, CA USA


Brin @ NASA NIAC Meeting
January 27 -30, 2015
Orlando, FL USA


Brin @ AAAS Annual Meeting
February 12 -16, 2015
San Jose, CA USA


Brain @ North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress
February 26 -1, 2015
New York, NY USA


Wallach, Hughes @ Governance of Emerging Technologies
May 26 -28, 2015
Scottsdale, AZ USA


Hughes @ Juniata H+ Conference
July 26 -30, 2015
Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA USA


Hughes, Sorgner @ Beyond Humanism Conf: From Humanism to Post- and Transhumanism?
September 15 -18, 2015
Ewha Woman's Univ, Seoul, S. Korea


ieet news

For a Longer, Brighter and More Just Future
(Dec 20, 2014)

2014 has been an exciting year for emerging technologies, and we want to share some of our news. We hope we can count on your continued support and involvement in the coming year.

IEET Audience Wants Regulation of DIY Biohacking
(Dec 14, 2014)

We asked “Should DIY biohackers be subject to the same safety regulations and oversight as corporate biological research labs?” Of the 573 of you that responded six out of ten (61%) believed that biohackers should be subject to some kind of regulation.


Technoprogressive Declaration - Transvision 2014 (Nov 22, 2014)

New Affiliate Scholars: John Messerly and Amon Twyman (Nov 21, 2014)


ieet articles


#18: The Future of Work and Death
by B. J. Murphy
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Whether you consider yourself a futurist, a technoprogressive, a Transhumanist, we all recognize the ongoing neglect by mainstream media, Hollywood, and other prominent media institutions in regards to a growing realization – the concepts of both work and death are changing before our very eyes! From technological unemployment now starting to affect workers in the industrial nations, to the international scientific community becoming more involved in anti-aging research, it’s quite clear that our near future may see the destruction of what we consider “working” and “dying.”


Robotic Nation (3) Robotic Freedom
by Marshall Brain
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

If you have read the articles entitled Robotic Nation, Robots in 2015 and Manna, and if you have looked at the many robotic news items on this page, then you may be coming to a new realization. We are standing right now on the threshold of the robotic era. Once robots start arriving in the job market in significant numbers—something that we will see happening within a decade or so—they have the potential to dramatically change the world economy.


Robotic Nation (2) Robots in 2015
by Marshall Brain
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Imagine that you have a time machine and you are able to travel back in time to the year 1950: If you walk into a restaurant, hotel or store in 1950, it would be nearly identical to a restaurant, hotel or store today. People do everything in both cases—people stock the shelves, prepare the food, serve the food, help customers, man the cash registers and sweep the floors in 2003 just like they did in 1950…


Robotic Nation (1)
by Marshall Brain
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

I went to McDonald's this weekend with the kids. We go to McDonald's to eat about once a week because it is a mile from the house and has an indoor play area. Our normal routine is to walk in to McDonald's, stand in line, order, stand around waiting for the order, sit down, eat and play.  


2014 Was a Good Year: Better Than You Remember
by Ramez Naam
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Eric Garner. Michael Brown. The Sony hack and surrender to fear. 2014 seems to be ending on a crappy note. My twitter feed is full of people expressing good riddance to the year. 2014 was better than that. I want to take a moment to remind us, and to offer some perspective on the dark stories. So, good things about 2014:


Stopping the innocent from pleading guilty: Can brain-based recognition detection tests help?
by John Danaher
Dec 22, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

So I have another paper coming out. It’s about plea-bargaining, brain-based lie detection and the innocence problem. I wasn’t going to write about it on the blog, but then somebody sent me a link to a recent article by Jed Radoff entitled “Why Innocent People Plead Guilty”. Radoff’s article is an indictment of the plea-bargaining system currently in operation in the US. Since my article touches upon same thing, I thought it might be worth offering a summary of its core argument.


#19: Nanomedical Cognitive Enhancement
by Melanie Swan
Dec 21, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Overview of Advances Articulated in Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions (2013) [1] This article provides an overview of the research findings related to cognitive enhancement that are presented in Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions (2013), an encyclopedic textbook chronicling a plethora of recent advances in myriad areas of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. The final chapter discusses progress in nanomedical cognitive enhancement, where we find ourselves in a modern era in which many technologies appear to be on the cusp – helping to resolve pathologies while also having much future potential for the augmentation of human capabilities.


#20: Shape-shifting claytronics: wild future here by 2020, experts say
by Dick Pelletier
Dec 21, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Imagine a bracelet or watch that changes into something else when you take it off. Perhaps it becomes a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Although this scenario may seem like science fiction, this and much more will soon become reality with a ground-breaking new technology known as claytronics.


Superintelligences Are Already Out There!
by John G. Messerly
Dec 20, 2014 • (1) CommentsPermalink

“I think it very likely—in fact, inevitable—that biological intelligence is only a transitory phenomenon… If we ever encounter extraterrestrial intelligence, I believe it is very likely to be postbiological in nature …” Paul Davies


Self Absorption
by Joseph R. Carvalko
Dec 19, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Looking back on my early experience as a young engineer, I am reminded how little my colleagues and I appreciated that what we did would change the world, for good and for bad. I am also reminded how Marcel Golay, one of my early mentors understood the duality of technology and how this feature plays large in its application for the right purpose.


Wage Slavery and Sweatshops as Free Enterprise?
by David S. D'Amato
Dec 19, 2014 • (1) CommentsPermalink

The conservative American Enterprise Institute offers yet another defense of sweatshops from a self-styled advocate of liberty and free markets, Professor Mark J. Perry. Indeed it is more than just a defense; it’s a selective compilation of quotes and anecdotes hailing sweatshops as perfectly praiseworthy routes out of poverty.


Currency Multiplicity: Social Economic Networks
by Melanie Swan
Dec 17, 2014 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Cryptocoin multiplicity is just one kind of currency multiplicity in the modern world. More broadly, we are living in an increasingly multi-currency society with all kinds of monetary and non-monetary currencies.


#21: Your nanorobotics future: life truly becomes ‘magical’
by Dick Pelletier
Dec 17, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

"You enter the wellness center and tell the receptionist avatar that you're here for an annual restoration, and though your real age is 110, you would like to be restored to the age of a 20-something. A nurse then injects billions of genome-specific 'bots non-invasively through the skin; you're now set for another year."


Meaning, Value and the Collective Afterlife: Must others survive for our lives to have meaning?
by John Danaher
Dec 17, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Samuel Scheffler made quite a splash last year with his book Death and the Afterlife. It received impressive recommendations and reviews from numerous commentators, and was featured in a variety of popular outlets, including the Boston Review and the New York Review of Books. I’m a bit late to the party, having only got around to reading it in the past week, but I think I can see what all the fuss was about.


Torture and the Ticking Time Bomb
by John G. Messerly
Dec 16, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Why do people torture others? Why do they march others into gas chambers? Because some are psychopaths or sadists or power hungry. Depravity is in their DNA. Some are not inherently depraved but believe the situation demands torture. If others are evil and we are good, then we should kill and torture them with impunity. Such ideas result from the demonization of others, from a simplistic worldview in which good battles evil. If others torture, they are war criminals; if we torture are motives are pure. But the world is more nuanced than this. There is good and evil within us all.


#22: Ray Kurzweil on Rationality and the Moral Considerability of Intelligent Machines
by Daryl Wennemann
Dec 16, 2014 • (1) CommentsPermalink

In his new work, How to Create a Mind [HCM], Ray Kurzweil reflects on the moral considerability of intelligent machines. He believes that in the near future we will be confronted with machines that have cognitive abilities and emotive expressions that closely emulate those of humanB beings. (I use the term “HumanB” and its cognates to designate biological humanity and the term “HumanM” and its cognates to designate moral humanity, i.e., persons). The issue for him is whether we humanB beings will be able to identify morally with non-humanB artificial persons that do not have a biological existence.


Should we criminalise robotic rape and robotic child sexual abuse?
by John Danaher
Dec 16, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

I recently published an unusual article. At least, I think it is unusual. It imagines a future in which sophisticated sex robots are used to replicate acts of rape and child sexual abuse, and then asks whether such acts should be criminalised. In the article, I try to provide a framework for evaluating the issue, but I do so in what I think is a provocative fashion. I present an argument for thinking that such acts should be criminalised, even if they have no extrinsically harmful effects on others. I know the argument is going to be unpalatable to some, and I myself balk at its seemingly anti-liberal/anti-libertarian dimensions, but I thought it was sufficiently interesting to be worth spelling out in some detail. Hence why I wrote the article.


#23: Indefinite lifespan in our future; experts ponder responses
by Dick Pelletier
Dec 16, 2014 • (0) CommentsPermalink

To begin this article on living longer, we focus on a fascinating TED talk where science writer David Duncan poses questions based on "When I'm 164".


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The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States. Please give as you are able, and help support our work for a brighter future.

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Big Data: The learning health-care system revolution
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Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 (Computer Simulation from the Genome to the Environment)
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The small and surprisingly dangerous detail the police track about you
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Alan Watts by South Park creators (All in one in HD)
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Alan Watts by South Park creators (All in one in HD)
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comments

Christian K. Nordtomme on 'Superintelligences Are Already Out There!' (Dec 21, 2014)

AmbassadorZot on '#22: Ray Kurzweil on Rationality and the Moral Considerability of Intelligent Machines' (Dec 20, 2014)

reddibrek on 'Currency Multiplicity: Social Economic Networks' (Dec 20, 2014)

pansi4 on 'The Slut Shaming, Sex-Negative Message in the Christmas Story: It's Worth a Family Conversation' (Dec 20, 2014)

Vigrith on 'Technoprogressive Declaration - Transvision 2014' (Dec 20, 2014)

ericscoles on 'The small and surprisingly dangerous detail the police track about you' (Dec 20, 2014)

instamatic on 'Wage Slavery and Sweatshops as Free Enterprise?' (Dec 19, 2014)

JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life




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