Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: CognitiveLiberty



MULTIMEDIA: CognitiveLiberty Topics

How a Math Algorithm Could Educate the Whole World — for Free

3 ways to fix a broken news industry

Trump To Keep One Obama Policy In Place

Jonathan Pugh on Bio-Conservatism and Human Enhancement

Where is cybercrime really coming from?

Andy Zee Talks RefuseFascism With John Iadarola On The Young Turks

Bernie Has Some Questions For Trump’s Education Pick…

MLK to BLM: The Internet and Civil Rights In 2017

Digital Culture: Learn the Language before You Dismiss It

The Science of Bias, Empathy, and Dehumanization

The Free Press: How a War on Truth Threatens Democracy

Trump’s Shocking Plan To STEAL From Native Americans

HISTORIC Victory At Standing Rock

First Republican “Hamilton Elector” Breaks Ranks Against Trump

Voting Reformation: 3 Alternate Approaches to Participatory Democracy




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CognitiveLiberty Topics




Value Conflicts surrounding the Meaning of Life in the Trans/Post/Human Future

by Steve Fuller

Posthumanists and perhaps especially transhumanists tend to downplay the value conflicts that are likely to emerge in the wake of a rapidly changing technoscientific landscape. What follows are six questions and scenarios that are designed to focus thinking by drawing together several tendencies that are not normally related to each other but which nevertheless provide the basis for future value conflicts.



Transparency, Privacy and Surveillance in a new era

by David Brin

Surviving Surveillance: My co-editor of the Chasing Shadows anthology - Stephen W. Potts - has written a “5 books” contribution to the Tor web site, taking you on a tour of (almost) half a dozen great science fictional portrayals of surveillance.



Why Truth Matters

by John G. Messerly

“It is morally as bad not to care whether a thing is true or not, so long as it makes you feel good, as it is not to care about how you got your money as long as you have got it.”
~ Edmund Way Teale



Utopia Now!

by Rick Searle

Given all the chaos and pessimism lately and in light of the fact that with the inauguration of Trump we will be walking into very dangerous times, it’s perhaps a good moment for a little bit of hope, though the progressive rallies over the last few days certainly make me feel hopeful.



Algocracy as Hypernudging: A New Way to Understand the Threat of Algocracy

by John Danaher

It is a noticeable feature of intellectual life that many people research the same topics, but do so using different conceptual and disciplinary baggage, and consequently fail to appreciate how the conclusions they reach echo or complement the conclusions reached by others.



Perceptive and myopic views of our transparent future. Especially police cameras.

by David Brin

Let’s veer from either science fiction or politics into our politically science-fictional new world of light. Starting with a reminder that my new anthology (with Stephen Potts) Chasing Shadows, is released this week by Tor Books, featuring contributions by William Gibson, James Gunn, Neal Stephenson, Vernor Vinge and many others, offering stories and insights into a future when light flows almost everywhere. Prepare yourself!  This might be a good start.



Articles About American Authoritarianism

by John G. Messerly

“Is ours a government of the people, by the people, for the people, or a kakistocracy rather, for the benefit of knaves at the cost of fools?” ~ James Russell Lowell

For the past few weeks, I have been reviewing articles about the trend toward authoritarianism in the USA. Unfortunately, articles appear faster than I can read and review them, so I’ll have to stop and move on soon. With this in mind, I list a few of the pieces I won’t get to, followed by excerpts from some other good ones.



Eliezer Yudkowsky on Politics – Part 2

by John G. Messerly

Our two previous posts showed how prospect theory in behavioral economics explains why so many gambled on Trump, and why the artificial intelligence and decision theory expert Eliezer Yudkowsky thinks that this was a mistake. In a post written the day before the election, Yudkowsky expanded on both themes, providing a simple explanation of how many of the gamblers reasoned:



The best political countersurveillance tool is to grow the heck up

by Marcelo Rinesi

The thing is, we’re all naughty. The specifics of what counts as “wrong” depend on the context, but there isn’t anybody on Earth so boring that haven’t done or aren’t doing something they’d rather not be known worldwide.

Full Story...



Eliezer Yudkowsky on Politics – Part 1

by John G. Messerly

In our previous post we examined how prospect theory helps explain why so many American voters were willing to risk voting for such a manifestly unqualified candidate for President as Donald Trump. Of course what citizens who are willing to take these risks fail to understand, as the artificial intelligence and decision theory expert Eliezer Yudkowsky writes on his Facebook page, is “how there’s a level of politics that’s theater and a level of politics that’s deadly serious.” For example, it’s deadly serious when a President talks about scrapping the NATO alliance or using nuclear weapons. In such cases you would hope that competent and conscientious people exercise power in the international relations realm.



Thiel Fellowships, Singularity University, and the value of good old-fashioned universities

by Ben Goertzel

This Business Insider article on the outcome so far of the Thiel Fellowship experiment is interesting, though not surprising..



How Trump, Grifter for the Elite, Grabbed Government for the 0.01 Percent

by Richard Eskow

Our country’s privileged few used to exert their control through political surrogates. Now, thanks to Donald Trump, they’re taking a more hands-on approach.



Do You Have A Right To Your Opinion? Trump and Millions of Illegal Votes

by John G. Messerly

Trump: “I believe that cows can jump over the moon.”
Question: “Is that really true?”
Pence: “He has a right to his opinion.”

Donald Trump recently tweeted: “In addition to winning the electoral college in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.”



Will Trump Bring the Robot Apocalypse?

by Richard Eskow

The future was supposed to bring prosperity and leisure to working people, not joblessness and misery. But that was before the money guys took over.



Education & The Election

by John G. Messerly

There is plenty of analysis on why Trump narrowly won the crucial states that gave him an electoral college victory—Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan—even though Clinton won the popular vote by more than 2.5 million votes.  But what was particularly striking was how, even if we control for race and income, educational levels best predict how people voted in the election.  Of course this was expected, but I was shocked by how much a difference education made in terms of voter preference.



The Fake-News Head Fake

by Rick Searle

It will be a long time into the future before we will know just what this election ultimately meant. What is perhaps more clear, even if we avoid donning the rose colored glasses of hindsight, is that the seeds that sprouted in 2016 were a long time- a- growing. They might even have been anticipated as far back as the culture wars that exploded onto the scene in the late 1960’s. More on that in a moment.



Devastated by the American Presidential Election

by John G. Messerly

Like most of my readers, I am devastated by the 2016 American Presidential election results (and by the Congressional election results as well.) I have waited a few weeks to write about it so as not to be reacting too emotionally to the results. Since that time my usual focus on philosophy has faded into the background as the country in which I was born and lived all of my life finds itself in perhaps its greatest existential crisis.



How the IEET Audience Gets its News

We asked how you get your news. Of the 2000 responses we received, the most popular source of news was online newspapers and magazines, followed by Facebook.

Full Story...



Shining light on cyber-secrets

by David Brin

Okay. All right. I’ve posted my thoughts about moving forward after this election. And yes, with confidence in a future-oriented civilization that may, yet, save the planet and take us to the stars.



What a Trump Presidency Means for Human Survival: One Expert’s Take

by Phil Torres

Since its inception, the field of existential risk studies has recognized “bad governance” as an important factor that could modulate overall existential risk — or constitute an existential risk in its own right, if such governance were to gain global control.

Full Story...



Is Robust Moral Realism a kind of Religious Belief?

by John Danaher

Robust moral realism is the view that moral facts exist, but that they are not reducible to non-moral or natural facts. According to the robust realist, when I say something like ‘It is morally wrong to torture an innocent child for fun’, I am saying something that is true, but whose truth is not reducible to the non-moral properties of torture or children. Robust moral realism has become surprisingly popular in recent years, with philosophers like Derek Parfit, David Enoch, Erik Wielenberg and Russell Shafer-Landau all defending versions of it.



Competitive Cognitive Artifacts and the Demise of Humanity: A Philosophical Analysis

by John Danaher

David Krakauer seems like an interesting guy. He is the president of the Santa Fe institute in New Mexico, a complexity scientist and evolutionary theorist, with a noticeable interest in artificial intelligence and technology. I first encountered his work — as many recently did — via Sam Harris’s podcast. In the podcast he articulated some concerns he has about the development of artificial intelligence, concerns which he also set out in a recent (and short) article for the online magazine Nautilus.



IEET Affiliate Scholar John Danaher Publishes New Paper on Moral Enhancement

IEET Affiliate Scholar John Danaher has a new paper coming out in the journal Neuroethics. This one argues that directly augmenting the brain might be the most politically appropriate method of moral enhancement. This paper brings together his work on enhancement, the extended mind, and the political consequences of advanced algorithmic governance. Details below:

Full Story...
Link to Neuroethics



IEET Affiliate Scholar John Danaher Publishes New Paper in Journal: Bioethics

IEET Affiliate Scholar John Danaher published a new paper coming out in the journal Bioethics. It’s about the philosophy of education and student use of cognitive enhancement drugs. It suggests that universities might be justified in regulating their students’ use of enhancement drugs, but only in a very mild, non-compulsory way. It suggests that a system of voluntary commitment contracts might be an interesting proposal. The details are below.

Full Story...
Link to Bioethics



Ethicists Generally Agree: The Pro-Life Arguments Are Worthless

by John G. Messerly

Abortion continues to make political news, but a question rarely asked by politicians or other interlocutors is: what do professional ethicists think about abortion? If ethicists have reached a consensus about the morality or immorality of abortion, surely their conclusions should be important. And, as a professional ethicist myself, I can tell you that among ethicists it is exceedingly rare to find defenders of the view that abortion is murder. In fact, support for this anti-abortion position, to the extent it exists at all, comes almost exclusively from the small percentage of philosophers who are theists. Yet few seem to take notice of this fact.



I Know What You’re Thinking…

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

“What I hate is ignorance, smallness of imagination, the eye that sees no farther than its own lashes. All things are possible. Who you are is limited only by who you think you are.”

~ Egyptian Book of the Dead, written between 2000 – 1500 B.C.



Moral Bioenhancement: Thinking Synergistically - interview with Harris Wiseman

by Hank Pellissier

Harris Wiseman gained his PhD from the University of Cambridge, and is author of the book The Myth of the Moral Brain – The Limits of Moral Enhancement, published by MIT Press.

I emailed him the interview questions below:

Full Story...



Transhuman Debate 2.0 in SF East Bay

IEET is co-sponsoring “Transhuman Debate 2.0” on April 2, 2016, from 12:30 - 4:00pm in Oakland, CA, at Octopus Literary Salon, 2101 Webster St, #170 - only 2 blocks from BART.

Full Story...



Google Hedonics

by Andrés Gómez Emilsson

Hello my children!
Hello my sons!
Hello my daughters!
Hello my brothers and sisters!
I’m here to tell you that the world’s last unpleasant experience…
Will be a precisely dateable event!
Yes! It will happen in our lifetimes if we commit all of our energy today…

To the task of Paradise Engineering!

– Yacht, Paradise Engineering

(referencing David Pearce’s Hedonistic Imperative

Full Story...



Political Delusions - Do we just rationalize our emotional decisions?

by David Brin

I’ve long maintained that humanity’s greatest gift and greatest curse are one and the same - our prodigious talent for delusion.  For believing things - passionately - that are belied by both logic and evidence. This is the wellspring of great art. Indeed, as a novelist* I cater to the desire of my own customers to - temporarily and knowingly - believe they are experiencing other realities and the thoughts of credible characters, engaged in barely plausible adventures.

Full Story...

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