Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies



Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view



UPCOMING EVENTS: Innovation



MULTIMEDIA: Innovation Topics

The Future of Superhuman Technology

Transhumanist Fashion Research Film

AI, Immortality and the Future of Selves

Martine Rothblatt and Bina48 interviewed by Joe Rogan

Transformative Technology: An Evolution of Contemplative Practice

Gray Matters

The Role of Bioprinting in Rejuvenation (25min)

What Will Politics Be Like in the Future?

Regulating a Damage Repair Approach to Cure the Diseases of Aging (55min)

The Rejuvenation of Aged Skeletal Muscle by Systematic Factors (18min)

What is Sarcopenia? Definitions, Diagnosis and Developing Interventions (23min)

Toxicologists are Freakin’ Awesome!

Why sitting is bad for you

Future Day Online

A Simulated Mouse Brain in a Virtual Mouse Body




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Innovation Topics




Solar: The First 1% Was the Hardest

by Ramez Naam

Solar power now provides roughly 1% of the world’s electricity.  It took 40 years to reach that milestone. But, as they say in tech, the first 1% is the hardest.

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Human Brain 2.0 - what is the most essential upgrade? Increased Rationality, Empathy, or Happiness?

by Hank Pellissier

Our human brains obviously needs improvement, in multiple different capacities. But - what is the most important upgrade? Increased Rationality? Increased Empathy? Elevated Happiness?

I posed this question to members of IEET’s new Advisory Board, and I received a variety of answers:

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Simple Intervention Cuts Unplanned Pregnancy by Half

by Valerie Tarico

A single half-day training that teaches medical clinics how to provide better birth control can radically improve outcomes for patients, cutting unplanned pregnancies by half according to research published in the prestigious medical journal, The Lancet.

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AI Will Solve Aging - it is a Tool, Not a Threat

by David Kekich

Dear Future Centenarian, 

I’ve been stumping for some time about how Artificial Intelligence will provide the shortest path to curing aging forever. In fact, without it, I’m convinced we won’t solve aging in our lifetime. I’m glad to hear Peter Diamandis describe AI as the most important technology we’re developing this decade.

Peter goes on to say it’s a massive opportunity for humanity, not a threat, as well as the following:

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John Gray and the Puppets of Gloom

by Rick Searle

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about puppets. I know that sounds way too paleo-tech, and weird, but hear me out. Puppets are an ancient technology, which, for all the millennia that passed before, and up until very, very recently, were the primary way we experienced animated art. For the vast majority of human history the way we watched projected figures in front of us playing out some imagined drama was in the form of shadows cast on the walls.

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The Monsters of Jurassic World

by Russell Blackford

Philosophers and blockbusters

There are at least three reasons why philosophers take an interest in hugely popular cultural products such Hollywood blockbuster action movies.

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Will Artificial Intelligence be a Buddha? Is Fear of AI just a symptom of Human Self-Loathing?

by Nicole Sallak Anderson

I’m interested in the intersection of consciousness and technology, so when I discovered the Consciousness Hacking MeetUp in Silicon Valley,  (organized by IEET Affiliate Scholar Mikey Siegel) I signed up immediately.

Soon afterwards, I attended a MeetUp titled, “Enlightened AI”, at Sophia University in Palo Alto.  The talk was led by Google researcher, Mohamad Tarifi, PhD.  Not only is he a bright engineer working on the next level of artificial intelligence at one of the top companies in the Valley, he’s also very well versed in the philosophies of consciousness. From the Abrahamic traditions, to the Buddhists and Eastern teachings, Tarifi displayed a grasp of the whole of humanity unlike any other technologist I’ve met.

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The Quest for Morphological Freedom - Caitlyn Jenner, Rachel Dolezal, and All of Us Everywhere

by Valkyrie Ice McGill

Every major news site is currently packed with dozens of articles on Caitlyn Jenner, the Olympic Decathlon winner and openly transgender “hero”, and Rachel Dolezal, the former “white person” who was head of Spokane NAACP, but now she’s a disgraced “villian.”

You think their journeys are different?

Honestly, they look exactly the same to me. Both are after the identical objective, the ability to be who they choose to be, regardless of the role “society” is trying to force them into.

They both want Morphological Freedom.

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What’s the EROI (Energy Return on Investment) of Solar?

by Ramez Naam

There’s a graph making rounds lately showing the comparative EROIs of different electricity production methods. (EROI is Energy Return On Investment – how much energy we get back if we spend 1 unit of energy. For solar this means – how much more energy does a solar panel generate in its lifetime than is used to create it?)

This EROI graph that is making the rounds is being used to claim that solar and wind can’t support an industrialized society like ours.

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Rakawa in the Age of Quantified Self

by Soenke Ziesche

Seven years, ago when microblogging was still fairly new, I co-launched rakawa.net. Inspired by the work of the Japanese conceptual artist On Kawara, (photo below) Rakawa is a tool to document daily accomplishments by entering a response of up to 150 characters to the question “What have you achieved today?” Optionally a picture for illustration can be added.

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Should Politicians be Replaced by Artificial Intelligence? Interview with Mark Waser

by Hank Pellissier

Robotic Machines with Artificial Intelligence might soon replace farm laborers, factory workers, fast food employeespreschool teachers, airplane pilots, and car and truck drivers

Why? Because rational, focused machines are more efficient at these tasks; they’re cheaper to employ and less error-prone.

Should AI also replace politicians?

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Basic Income as Paid Parental Leave - how new mothers actually use basic income when given it

by Scott Santens

Once again John Oliver has shone a light on something important we tend to not discuss, and that is the way we in the United States collectively treat those who just gave birth.

We force them right back to work.

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Humans are Infinitely more Dangerous than Robots

by Michael Lee

Innovator Elon Musk was widely reported in the media when he described artificial intelligence (AI) as probably the most serious threat to the survival of the human race. [1] But while artificial intelligence systems will certainly take over an increasing range and number of jobs formerly carried out by people, humans will remain infinitely more dangerous than robots for generations to come.

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Transhumanism and Aesthetics

by William Gillis

The recent push by a circle of my friends to produce more anarcho-transhumanist imagery has gotten me thinking about the paucity of aesthetics in the broader transhumanist movement.

Frankly—if we’re going on aesthetics alone—I’ve found most of what’s produced by transhumanists to be quite repelling. This is kind of understandable though. Transhumanism has long existed in an awkward state. We’re not really a traditionally evangelical sort of ideology, or an ideology at all really. Believing that physical/technological freedom is important is hardly a political platform, valuing scientific research is not really a traditional call to action, and so it’s no wonder that when some decide to make glossy brochures they so often come across as awkward imitations. The ideologues of those perspectives we’re at odds with have a lot of experience in the dark arts and in comparison we often come across as naive dilettantes.

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The Automation Loop and its Negative Consequences

by John Danaher

I’m currently reading Nicholas Carr’s book The Glass Cage: Where Automation is Taking Us.  

I think it is an important contribution to the ongoing debate about the growth of AI and robotics, and the future of humanity. Carr is something of a techno-pessimist (though he may prefer ‘realist’) and the book continues the pessimistic theme set down in his previous book The Shallows (which was a critique of the internet and its impact on human cognition). That said, I think The Glass Cage is a superior work. I certainly found it more engaging and persuasive than his previous effort.

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The Basic Affordability of Basic Income

by Scott Santens

In a somewhat surprising turn of events, The Economist in its May 23rd edition, published a piece with no name attached, where it labeled the idea of a basic income for all as “basically unaffordable.”  It then followed the publication with share after share via social media, with tweets such as “Why a ‘basic income’ for all is a bad idea for all”, and “Why the Green Party is wrong to support a ‘basic income’ for all.”

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The White House Supports A Proposed Ban On Editing The Human Germline

by George Dvorsky

In the wake of news that scientists in China modified the DNA of human embryos,  a number of scientists and bioethicists have called for a global moratorium on experiments that could alter the human germline. The White House has come out in support of such a ban — for now.

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Is Automation Making us Stupid? The Degeneration Argument Against Automation

by John Danaher

This post continues my discussion of the arguments in Nicholas Carr’s recent book The Glass Cage. The book is an extended critique of the trend towards automation. In the previous post, I introduced some of the key concepts needed to understand this critique. As I noted then, automation arises whenever a machine (broadly understood) takes over a task or function that used to be performed by a human (or non-human animal). Automation usually takes place within an intelligence ‘loop’.

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Holacracy and the Transhumanist Party UK

by Amon Twyman

The Transhumanist Party UK represents a new branch of the Transhumanist movement, and as such is now taking the first steps in a long journey. Here at the beginning, we have the opportunity to consider how our movement will be organised, and what kind of character we want it to develop. We have a lot to think about, and work toward.

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Freedom in the Age of Algorithms

by Rick Searle

Reflect for a moment on what for many of us has become the average day. You are awoken by your phone whose clock is set via a wireless connection to a cell phone tower, connected to a satellite, all ultimately ending in the ultimate precision machine, a clock that will not lose even a second after 15 billion years of ticking.

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Top 5 Myths About Monsanto (Part 1)

by B. J. Murphy

Anyone who has the scientific tenacity to question “common truths” and come to a valid conclusion outside of the confines of popular opinion are destined to be heralded as someone working in the pocket of some agency. Conspiracy theories run amok throughout society, believing any large corporation to be intrinsically “evil”. One corporation in particular stands out the most: Monsanto!

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The Future of Personal Privacy - Review of “You Have Been Inventoried”

by Tery Spataro

On Friday March 6, 2015, more than 3,000 people attended the ASU Emerge event. This is where Eric Kingsbury, futurist, founder of KITEBA, cofounder of the Confluence Project, launched “You Have Been Inventoried”.  I helped with some of the content for the project, along with others from the Confluence Project.

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How Freedom of Information Will Change the World

by Valkyrie Ice McGill

Everywhere you look in the world you can see pessimism, gloom, doom and negativity. No matter where you live, it seems many are convinced that there’s just no hope. Many people have stopped trying to do anything, while they “wait for god” or “wait for the Singularity.” Or simply wait, period.

The negativity is everywhere.

So, here’s one of my rants, against that negativity.

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What, Me Worry? - I Don’t Share Most Concerns About Artificial Intelligence

by Lawrence Krauss

There has of late been a great deal of ink devoted to concerns about artificial intelligence, and a future world where machines can “think,” where the latter term ranges from simple autonomous decision-making to full fledged self-awareness. I don’t share most of these concerns, and I am personally quite excited by the possibility of experiencing thinking machines, both for the opportunities they will provide for potentially improving the human condition, to the insights they will undoubtedly provide into the nature of consciousness.

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What Happened When Liberia Tested a Pilot Program of Cash Transfers to the Extreme Poor in Bomi?

by Scott Santens

Further evidence of the potential of basic income

I’m always on the lookout for more scientific evidence of what happens when people are provided cash incomes unconditionally. Recently I found something new, a pilot program tested in Bomi and Maryland Counties in Liberia that started in 2009 and ended in late 2014.

Implemented by the Liberian Ministry of Gender and Development with support from UNICEF and funded by the EU and Japan, it was called the “Social Cash Transfer Programme (SCT)” and was aimed at the “ultra-poor” - the poorest of the poor.

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Aristotle, Robot Slaves, and a New Economic System

by John G. Messerly

Jaron Lanier’s book “Who Owns the Future?” discusses the role that technology plays in both eliminating jobs and increasing income inequality. Early in the book Lanier quotes from Aristotle’s Politics:

If every instrument could accomplish its own work, obeying or anticipating the will of others, like the statues of Daedalus, or the tripods of Hephaestus, which, says the poet, “of their own accord entered the assembly of the Gods; ”if, in like manner, the shuttle would weave and the plectrum touch the lyre without a hand to guide them, chief workmen would not want servants, nor masters slaves.

Aristotle saw that the human condition largely depends on what machines can and cannot do; moreover, we can imagine that machines will do much more.

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Three Transhumanist Organizations Fund “Science & Literacy Centre” in Uganda

by Hank Pellissier

The Mormon Transhumanist Association (MTA) members of the Christian Transhumanist Association,  and Alcor Life Extension Foundation  have teamed up to establish a “Science & Literacy Centre” in Kyarumba, a small village in western Uganda. The project has attained 100% of its funding via generous individuals who donated money primarily at the GoFundMe campaign site.

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Neural Data Privacy Rights - An Issue We *Should* Be Worried About

by Melanie Swan

A worry that is not yet on the scientific or cultural agenda is neural data privacy rights. Not even biometric data privacy rights are in purview yet which is surprising given the personal data streams that are amassing from quantified self-tracking activities. There are several reasons why neural data privacy rights could become an important concern.

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The “Reputation Web” Will Generate Countless Opportunities

by Lincoln Cannon

Technological change is accelerating and transforming our world. Assuming trends persist, we will soon experience an evolutionary shift in the mechanisms of reputation, a fundamental on which relationships are based. Cascading effects of the shift will revolutionize the way we relate with each other and our machines, incentivizing unprecedented degrees of global cooperation.

In 2015, you probably have more computing power than that of the Apollo Guidance computer in your smartphone, and yet Moore’s Law continues unabated at its fiftieth anniversary. Machines are becoming faster and smaller and smarter.

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Human Rights for Cyberconscious Beings

by Martine Rothblatt

Even if they aren’t flesh, “mindclones” deserve protection.

For much of the 20th century, capital punishment was carried out in most countries. During the preceding century many, like England, had daily public hangings. Today, even Russia, with a mountainous history of government-ordered executions, has a capital-punishment moratorium. Since 1996, it has not executed a criminal through the judicial system.

If we can learn to protect the lives of serial killers, child mutilators, and terrorists, surely we can learn to protect the lives of peace-loving model citizens known as mind clones and bemans—even if they initially seem odd or weird to us.

excerpt from Virtually Human: The Promise and Peril of Digital Immortality

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