Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies


The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States. Please give as you are able, and help support our work for a brighter future.


Search the IEET
Subscribe and Contribute to:


Technoprogressive? BioConservative? Huh?
Quick overview of biopolitical points of view




whats new at ieet

Will World War 3 Be Prevented Because of Global Interdependence?

The Injustice of Sexism

NASA Can Get Humans to Mars by 2033 (Without a Budget Increase!)

Where does intelligence come from?

8th Beyond Humanism Conference

The Universal Balance of Gravity and Dark Energy Predicts Accelerated Expansion


ieet books

Philosophical Ethics: Theory and Practice
Author
John G Messerly


comments

instamatic on 'NASA Can Get Humans to Mars by 2033 (Without a Budget Increase!)' (May 26, 2016)

almostvoid on 'Where does intelligence come from?' (May 26, 2016)

almostvoid on 'The Future of PR in Emotionally Intelligent Technology' (May 25, 2016)

almostvoid on 'Rituals Improve Life According to Ancient Chinese Philosophers' (May 25, 2016)

almostvoid on 'Optimize Brain Health by Balancing Social Life with Downtime' (May 23, 2016)

instamatic on 'Faithfulness--The Key to Living in the Zone' (May 22, 2016)

R Wordsworth Holt on 'These Are the Most Serious Catastrophic Threats Faced by Humanity' (May 22, 2016)







Subscribe to IEET News Lists

Daily News Feed

Longevity Dividend List

Catastrophic Risks List

Biopolitics of Popular Culture List

Technoprogressive List

Trans-Spirit List



JET

Enframing the Flesh: Heidegger, Transhumanism, and the Body as “Standing Reserve”

Moral Enhancement and Political Realism

Intelligent Technologies and Lost Life

Hottest Articles of the Last Month


Ethicists Generally Agree: The Pro-Life Arguments Are Worthless
May 17, 2016
(4297) Hits
(10) Comments

Artificial Intelligence in the UK: Risks and Rewards
May 12, 2016
(3328) Hits
(0) Comments

Nicotine Gum for Depression and Anxiety
May 5, 2016
(3030) Hits
(0) Comments

3D Virtual Reality Is the Best Storytelling Technology We’ve Ever Had
May 5, 2016
(2847) Hits
(1) Comments



IEET > Security > SciTech > Rights > Life > Access > Innovation > Vision > Futurism > Contributors > Dick Pelletier

Print Email permalink (6) Comments (8592) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


Could our solar system be heading for danger? Experts believe it is…


Dick Pelletier
By Dick Pelletier

Posted: Dec 26, 2012

Our solar system orbits around the Milky Way roughly every 200-250 million years and researchers at Cardiff University suggest that periodically, in cycles estimated at every 37 million years or so, we encounter dangerous ‘speed bumps’ with life-extinction-causing asteroids.

Millions of ricocheted rocks whiz by during these cycles, and many collide with planets, including Earth. Impact craters recorded worldwide show correlations with the cycle of these journeys through the galactic plane, including the one thought to have eliminated the dinosaurs two cycles ago.

Professor William Napier and Dr. Janaki Wickramasinghe have completed computer simulations of our sun’s movements in its outer spiral location in the Milky Way, and determined that we are now entering a danger zone where the odds of asteroid impact on Earth go up by a factor of ten.

Ten times a tiny chance might not seem like much, but when risk of extinction is on the table, it looks much more imposing.

In addition, asteroid impact is not our only danger. University of Kansas professors Mikhail Medvedev and Adrian Melott have charted the Milky Way’s movement through the universe and they discovered that our solar system is frequently exposed to cosmic rays that generate a shock front when our galaxy hits rough spots as it makes its way through the cosmos.

As we get closer to those rough spots, our galaxy becomes more exposed to the danger of increasing radiation that can destroy species, forcing evolutionary epochs. This theory also matches in time with the dinosaur extinction.

Either way, Stephen Hawking and Ray Kurzweil are right; we need to get off this ‘3rd rock from the sun’ as fast as possible and begin scattering our populations to the stars. Are you ready to turn Star Trek into reality and “go where no man has gone before?” I know I am.


Dick Pelletier was a weekly columnist who wrote about future science and technologies for numerous publications. He passed away on July 22, 2014.
Print Email permalink (6) Comments (8593) Hits •  subscribe Share on facebook Stumble This submit to reddit submit to digg


COMMENTS


“Are you ready to turn Star Trek into reality and “go where no man has gone before?” I know I am.”

You can start by signing this petition to build a Gen 1 Enterprise and getting as many people to sign it as possible (https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/assign-nasa-do-feasibility-study-and-conceptual-design-gen1-uss-enterprise-interplanetary-spaceship/DB07k8jF?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl).





Here’s a shorter link if it makes it easier:  http://wh.gov/QOb7





I agree with Mr. Pellletier - we need to be giving more attention to low-probability but catastrophic events. Also like the idea of building the Enterprise and have signed the petition.





Thanks Guys; I created an account and signed the petition. Go Enterprise!





Best to try spreading the word out smile.





Something about this article reminds me of the discovery channel or articles in new age rags - replete with misstatements and schlock like that from Zecharia Sitchin and his planet X in its impossible 3600 year orbit.

Asteroids are residents of our solar system, they aren’t extra solar invaders. We must have passed through lots of galactic arms in our 220 million year orbit of the galaxy many times as the sun oscillates below and above the plain of the galaxy like every other star.

Our solar system is exposed to cosmic rays ALL THE TIME, and the only minor danger points arise when the magnetic field goes through one of it’s flips, which have had no effect on the flora and fauna that is detectable.

Our Galaxy does not hit rough spots as it is not moving fast enough but other smaller galaxies routinely collide with it. Perhaps the author is confusing Galaxy with Solar system.





YOUR COMMENT (IEET's comment policy)

Login or Register to post a comment.

Next entry: Big Think Interview with Aubrey de Grey

Previous entry: #6 Piracetam - is it the smartest of the smart drugs?

HOME | ABOUT | FELLOWS | STAFF | EVENTS | SUPPORT  | CONTACT US
SECURING THE FUTURE | LONGER HEALTHIER LIFE | RIGHTS OF THE PERSON | ENVISIONING THE FUTURE
CYBORG BUDDHA PROJECT | AFRICAN FUTURES PROJECT | JOURNAL OF EVOLUTION AND TECHNOLOGY

RSSIEET Blog | email list | newsletter |
The IEET is a 501(c)3 non-profit, tax-exempt organization registered in the State of Connecticut in the United States.

East Coast Contact: Executive Director, Dr. James J. Hughes,
56 Daleville School Rd., Willington CT 06279 USA 
Email: director @ ieet.org     phone: 860-428-1837

West Coast Contact: Managing Director, Hank Pellissier
425 Moraga Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611
Email: hank @ ieet.org